Slicing vulcanized hockey pucks (duro 90) into coasters - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    1200 degrees Fahrenheit? That's one heck of a simulator!

    Stuart

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    1200 degrees Fahrenheit? That's one heck of a simulator!

    Stuart
    Yeah it's basically to simulate worst case scenario. I remember one time we were in for so long, about 5 minutes, maybe a little less, the the air in my Scott cylinder got so hot it was burning my throat breathing and my gear got super tight lol. It's not uncommon for things to melt.

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    Anytime we cut rubber on the lathe, we'll first freeze it in the break-room kitchen freezer, or in some dry-ice for fine feature/troublesome parts. Baby powder for lube.

    Now, in terms to slicing rubber: We build/service machines for thinning down heavy textiles called band-knife splitters. Works just like a horizontal band saw, but with a knife edge and precision feed guides and rolls to guide the material across the blade horizontally and split it to a desired thickness (down to .6 mm and occasionally thinner).
    c420_c520.jpg
    While designed primarily for dry goods like leather, they are also often used to split rubber goods. To do so they are fitted with an attachment that drips oil on the tip of the blade (in addition to the lubricant normally coating the body of the blade).

    Now I doubt the OP wants to buy heavy equipment for a quick job, but I'd start with the principals these splitters use:
    -ridiculously sharp and moving knife that the work is moved across
    -oil for lubricant

    You can buy knife blades for band saws. Not sure about the sharpening bit. I think they are changed out when dull, while on a band-knife splitter the machine has a built in sharpener that will often be in use while you are splitting material (gets dull faster than you'd think). But for a quick job on the band-saw, a new knife might be all you need.

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    Naegle's production-oriented solution is quite interesting. A cheaper one-off method might involve an electric upholstery knife. Basically a reciprocating very sharp knife blade on a base that can be run over a flat table. Don't think you'd get more than a dozen cuts before dulling the blade. But similar concept.

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    (gets dull faster than you'd think). But for a quick job on the band-saw, a new knife might be all you need.
    Can confirm. I recently needed to cut some square rings (.275 cross-section) on the lathe, "part-off" style. The x-acto knife looked a little silly sitting in a CA toolholder, but it did the job, losing about 0.005 - 0.010 off its tip each time it went through a ring. If I had any more than 6 to do, I'd have used the spare blade I brought with me to do the job.

    Edit to add: Diameter ~7" and speed was 300 RPM or so (250 sfm). Feed worked nicely at the lathe minimum of 0.0026" per rev diametrically, so I didn't go any faster. 70 durometer NBR. With a band saw blade, you have a lot more blade in the cut so friction is going to be a bigger factor for you.

  8. #26
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    Sounds like an impossible job, commercially.

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    Why can't you use sheet if you're looking for thin round disks? Sounds a lot more practical than slicing hockey pucks, assuming that is what you're actually proposing to do.

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  11. #28
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    Gotta be the real deal Dude!

    Hockey in the cards – Red Deer Advocate

    Stuart

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    I can't believe there is no 'hold my beer' youtube video of some smashed guy slicing a hockey puck on a commercial meat slicer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nmbmxer View Post
    Why can't you use sheet if you're looking for thin round disks? Sounds a lot more practical than slicing hockey pucks, assuming that is what you're actually proposing to do.
    That's what 99% of rubber products makers will do. Use a sheet made to the thickness you want and die-cut the outer peripherals. The other 1% is often cutting finished pieces down for testing, or odd-job work.

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    Hunt down the mfg's of these:

    https://www.ebay.com/p/Washington-Ca...d=292533707394

    Or Google up 'sliced hockey puck coasters' for a large number of offers. Tracking down their manufacturers will yield some info or possibly suppliers.

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    I wonder if on a lathe one might use a fixtured brand new fine tooth hack saw blade and slow turned the part(puck)perhaps 300 rpm running wet might work. Yes the saw mounted in the hack saw frame would not move but just swing down into the part.
    Perhaps the saw frame weighted one pound or so,, what pressure to cut but not stick.
    Perhaps the part in a 3 or 4 jaw chuck.
    Perhaps hand finish with flat lapping on auto wet paper.


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