Small tool room lathe recommendation - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Well, obviously it's a toolroom lathe, but it seems a very limited one in terms of getting much more done than fuzz cuts and fine threading. If that is all O.P. has in mind or if he doesn't mind the slow pace if there's much stock to be removed then he'd be good to go. Don't need a Pacemaker to get 5 HP - compared to ¾ HP that's 7 times the amount of work done in the same time if you're pushing both machines...I never realized that's all the HLV had. IMO anyway a 10EE would be better for a person with only one lathe.

  2. #62
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    "Tool Room" is a type of lathe not the size. I have seen several 20+ " tool room lathes. My 2 cents, I have a Monarch 10EE I/M and it has been a fantastic machine. I have used an HLV not an HLV-H and they are very different machines, a HLV or H is like a Miata or Lotus small and agile but lacking power. The 10EE is not much bigger in envelope but, far more power and heft. Collet work is the HLV-H sweet spot, yes you can do larger work on occasion but it is not the ideal choice. I do a lot of small parts for fuel systems on the 10EE and, larger stuff as well with odd throttle bodies etc.

    I have a 13EE and a 2013 lathe as well, the 10EE is the machine for work from under an inch to 5~6" in diameter. All machines have limitations and compromises, for a small lathe the 10EE checks "most" of the best features. Yea they have a wide ass, they also have that wonderful art-deco style.

    Steve

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  4. #63
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    Nobody has mentioned a Colchester Chipmaster aka Harrison 10AA. I have one of those and a Monarch 10EE. The Chippie is definitely more compact than a 10EE. The Chippie has a little less swing than the Monarch, and takes the same D1-3 tooling. It's got a 3-hp motor as opposed to the 10EE's 5 hp, but I doubt I've ever pulled max power out of either machine. The Chippie will definitely move some metal. I view the Chippie as being more nimble to operate than the 10EE, because the cross-feed screw is coarser and the carriage movement is geared higher. The feed clutch is snappier, too. The tradeoff is that I can't sweet-talk tenths out of the Chippie like I can out of the Monarch. I could do better if I had a better DRO on the Chippie. The Fagor on the 10EE reads in 0.0001 increments, whereas the Sony on the Chippie reads in 0.0004 increments. The Chippie is noisier than the 10EE, due to the former's use of timing belts in the drive.

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  6. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by rklopp View Post
    Nobody has mentioned a Colchester Chipmaster aka Harrison 10AA. I have one of those and a Monarch 10EE. The Chippie is definitely more compact than a 10EE. The Chippie has a little less swing than the Monarch, and takes the same D1-3 tooling. It's got a 3-hp motor as opposed to the 10EE's 5 hp, but I doubt I've ever pulled max power out of either machine. The Chippie will definitely move some metal. I view the Chippie as being more nimble to operate than the 10EE, because the cross-feed screw is coarser and the carriage movement is geared higher. The feed clutch is snappier, too. The tradeoff is that I can't sweet-talk tenths out of the Chippie like I can out of the Monarch. I could do better if I had a better DRO on the Chippie. The Fagor on the 10EE reads in 0.0001 increments, whereas the Sony on the Chippie reads in 0.0004 increments. The Chippie is noisier than the 10EE, due to the former's use of timing belts in the drive.
    The Chipmaster is pretty nice - I use mine a lot. Never had my hands on a 10EE to cut metal so can't compare.

    I can hold 10ths if I have to. Depending on the distance but I got it turning within 0.0003" parallel over 8" which was good enough for me.

    For some reason the control layout just works for me so I find it a real pleasure to use.

    I also have a mint condition Emco Maximat 11 which is a different class of beast. Also very well made and superbly accurate, at least as much as the Chipmaster, but a lot more lightly built and can't do the same cuts. But the accuracy & finish you can get are everything I could want. I don't use it much because I just prefer the ergonomics of the Chipmaster with its clutch and variable speed drive. Plus it takes 16mm shank tooling versus the Emco's 12mm as standard. I know Stefan Gottswinter has done various mods to his Emco to address various issues - I've taken note of them tht's for sure.

    Either, if in excellent condition, are wonderful machines to use.

    PDW

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    It's been a while since I have been up close to a Rivett lathe. A watchmaker I knew liked them better than the hlv-h. He had both. He didn't like the heavy tail stock
    on the hlv-h because it does not move easily on the bed.

    rivett lathe - Google Search

    I didn't buy a Monarch because they are a little too small for me.

    images.jpg

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  9. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by PDW View Post
    I don't use it much because I just prefer the ergonomics of the Chipmaster ...
    I think that has as much influence on "what's great" as the brand name. Any lathe worth its salt can make your parts. You tend to like the ones that fit your body best.

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    When I had my garage workshop, as much as I loved my Chippy, I hated the fact that it had to be positioned against a wall.
    Every-time i dropped something, the slope bed would ensure it was nearly irretrievable!

    For the same overall footprint/floor space, I preferred my Harrison M300. Just that little bit bigger all round and with a gap bed.
    But i did miss the Chippys variator.

    And for the small stuff, I had a Schaublin 102. Full set of collets (0.5>20mm @ 0.5mm increments + Imp). Great too and for speed, it's really lovely to have the two spindles, one with a 3 jaw and one with a collet head.

    If i had to choose for toolroom work with just the one machine - I'd have picked a Hardinge toolroom lathe (HLV).


    When i had my factory, I had an XYZ Prototrak 1630 machine.
    54mm spout, beefier than a Harrison M400 and a peach to use with the control.
    And I also had the Schaublin 102 sat alongside it - best of both worlds for me.

  11. #68
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    You guys are amazing. I have been offline pretty much since I asked this question, and was hoping I got an answer or two. I had no idea there were these many options! Now I have to sift through all this, and see if there is anything in my area that I might be able to get.

    Or, I need to pull 120,000 out of the bank! :-)

    Thank you all very very much. This is my first thread, and now I know where to go to task questions. Awesome.

  12. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Grainger View Post
    I've got a narrow bed HLV (presently in storage), and have had some time running a CVA toolroom lathe which was sort of an English made 10EE copy.

    Ignoring condition and reliability, they're 2 different animals. The Hardinge is great for small jobs and bits of threading. The CVA (so I'd guess this applies to the Monarch) was definitely more of a general-purpose good lathe.. There's a difference in feel/location and operation of the controls, as well as some physical differences which aren't so obvious on paper - until you've seen them.
    Glad you mentioned the CVA - a U.K. long bed Monarch 10ee copy with a normal gearbox (and less wiring to create smoke). As a hobbyist I was persuaded to buy one by the joint forces of Mark McGrath and John Stevenson (both RIP) with their considered recommendation that if you only have one lathe, this is the one. The past 15 or so years have proved them right.
    Everything said about the 10ee applies. Small enough to do fine work and solid enough at 3500lbs to do heavier work. And here in the U.K. with smaller workshops, smaller pickups and so on there's a very limited demand for a small heavy lathe, so you can get a decent one for less than 1,500 USD.
    If I was on the west coast I'd look for a decent 10ee or if you want a smaller machine the Chipmaster is a good alternative, if you could find one.

    Charles

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    Schäublin are first class. If you treat them right, they deliver perfectly. My practical experience includes the 102, 110, 135, and 180 CCN. Speak Schäublin like shoybleen.

    In return I’d like to state that America made the best movie cameras. Have brought a stuck pre-1927 Bell & Howell Filmo-70 A back to life with oil alone. Just plenty of light oil and two days patience. This morning it began to run again and after a few winds it runs like back then. Very good springs, very good steels, a stunning mechanism. Love them. 216 degrees shutter opening angle.

  14. #71
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    you better tell op what the prices are on those shoybleens.


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