snap ring grove question.
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    galt California
    Posts
    146
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    37
    Likes (Received)
    68

    Default snap ring grove question.

    I have been a maintenance machinist for almost 30 years , I make a lot of simple parts and shafts ect . I also repair a lot of parts by welding up and turning ect .
    I had a block yesterday about 6 inch x 4 inch with 2 bored bearings in it held in with snap rings , and was thinking how I would re cut them if needed .
    it would be a pain to have to dial them in on a 4 jaw or possibly set them up on a rotary table with a thin type woodruff type cutter .

    So my question is their a special tool or way to cut these on a mill with a boring head?

    also I only have manual Bridgeport mill and a lathe.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Temecula, Ca
    Posts
    2,737
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1242
    Likes (Received)
    3556

    Default

    never used one myself, but I believe that's what these are for,
    Grooving Head - Products

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,426
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1474
    Likes (Received)
    1617

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    never used one myself, but I believe that's what these are for,
    Grooving Head - Products
    That's pretty cool, but probably also serious coin. I doubt it is a reasonable solution for 'maintenance' type things. I would just say the OP is going to have to do it how he originally thought, 4 jaw or rotary table.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Brunswick Oh USA
    Posts
    4,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4964
    Likes (Received)
    2676

    Default

    You could use a boring and facing head.
    https://www.ebay.com/b/boring-facing-head/bn_7024876531

  5. Likes digger doug liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,495
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    252

    Default

    Odd shaped parts like castings for power transfer cases can be done in a mill with a Wohlhaupter type head often much easier then using a lathe. Cutting snapring,oring grooves, and facing, one can make almost invisible repairs to damaged welded up castings.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Beaver County Alb. Canada
    Posts
    1,842
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    532
    Likes (Received)
    906

    Default

    Fairly easy to dial in on a lathe, use a COAX dial.
    Good practice.

  8. Likes CalG, CHPZ_HAPPEN liked this post
  9. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    jacksonville,fl.
    Posts
    1,069
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    909
    Likes (Received)
    352

    Default

    I have several Narex B & Facing heads I could cut them with.However a lot of hard to hold parts I can always find a drop to make a light press mandrel and do them in one of the lathes.Really quick and not necessary to have a lot of speed.

    I also have a lot of internal & external grooving tools for the various widths.The cheap $7-20 Chinese internal/external bars(that use dog bone inserts) work really well.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,410
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    424
    Likes (Received)
    3393

    Default

    You can cut snap ring grooves with a standard boring head. Set up the proper cutter and feed the boring head out until the cutter touches the bore. Feed the boring head out a thou or two, and rotate the boring head by hand. Rinse and repeat until the proper depth is reached. Use spindle power for the final depth. Most snap ring grooves are so shallow this method may be faster than changing tools to a facing head.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    74
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    You can cut snap ring grooves with a standard boring head. Set up the proper cutter and feed the boring head out until the cutter touches the bore. Feed the boring head out a thou or two, and rotate the boring head by hand. Rinse and repeat until the proper depth is reached. Use spindle power for the final depth. Most snap ring grooves are so shallow this method may be faster than changing tools to a facing head.
    I've done it the same way many times.
    No need for a fancy Boring/facing Head

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    10,189
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1382
    Likes (Received)
    3659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    You can cut snap ring grooves with a standard boring head. Set up the proper cutter and feed the boring head out until the cutter touches the bore. Feed the boring head out a thou or two, and rotate the boring head by hand. Rinse and repeat until the proper depth is reached. Use spindle power for the final depth. Most snap ring grooves are so shallow this method may be faster than changing tools to a facing head.
    And whatever you do, don't touch off the bore and then move equal amounts in all 4 quadrant directions, and then do the same at the 45 degree offset positions. Never do that for rough counterbores for screw heads, either.

  13. Likes Hbjj liked this post
  14. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    Posts
    1,637
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    325
    Likes (Received)
    960

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    You can cut snap ring grooves with a standard boring head. Set up the proper cutter and feed the boring head out until the cutter touches the bore. Feed the boring head out a thou or two, and rotate the boring head by hand. Rinse and repeat until the proper depth is reached. Use spindle power for the final depth. Most snap ring grooves are so shallow this method may be faster than changing tools to a facing head.
    Another trick I learned when doing it this way is to use a boring bar with some extra length, This gives it a
    little "spring" so you can make your cuts in steps of .005" or so. If you've got a bunch to do it gets a bit tedious
    but for "onesie-twosies" it works fine. I've never tried turning the head by hand, always just powered up the
    spindle for each pass,

    Quote Originally Posted by HuFlungDung View Post
    And whatever you do, don't touch off the bore and then move equal amounts in all 4 quadrant directions, and then do the same at the 45 degree offset positions. Never do that for rough counterbores for screw heads, either.
    I'm trying to wrap my head around what you're saying and I'm coming up blank. I know you're a competent
    machinist so it must be my comprehension skills this morning. Care to clarify?

  15. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    galt California
    Posts
    146
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    37
    Likes (Received)
    68

    Default

    Thanks to everyone for their input , my plan was to check the thread a few times yesterday but every machine in the factory decided to turn to shit .
    the idea of slowly feeding the boring head out a few thou at a time will work, I rarely need to cut a grove on a odd part but was just thinking man theirs got to bean easier way. thanks guys.

  16. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,918
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    173
    Likes (Received)
    1042

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jumpinjimmy447 View Post
    Thanks to everyone for their input , my plan was to check the thread a few times yesterday but every machine in the factory decided to turn to shit .
    the idea of slowly feeding the boring head out a few thou at a time will work, I rarely need to cut a grove on a odd part but was just thinking man theirs got to bean easier way. thanks guys.
    There is a MUCH easier way...let someone else do it

  17. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    10,189
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1382
    Likes (Received)
    3659

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    Another trick I learned when doing it this way is to use a boring bar with some extra length, This gives it a
    little "spring" so you can make your cuts in steps of .005" or so. If you've got a bunch to do it gets a bit tedious
    but for "onesie-twosies" it works fine. I've never tried turning the head by hand, always just powered up the
    spindle for each pass,



    I'm trying to wrap my head around what you're saying and I'm coming up blank. I know you're a competent
    machinist so it must be my comprehension skills this morning. Care to clarify?
    It is basically 8 points of interpolation. With a cutter radius close to the bore size, the lobes at the bottom of the groove are minimal. You could do 16 points if you wanted to, but you'd discover that there's nothing much to cut.

    Using a 2 axis DRO, it's easy to calculate the 45 degree positions by .7071 * offset along the quadrant lines.

  18. Likes Garwood liked this post
  19. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    near Cleveland
    Posts
    813
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    55
    Likes (Received)
    104

    Default

    I'm for using the lathe: use strap clamps on a faceplate and a conventional groove tool. It's quicker than a rotary table on the mill, 'specially if you have a small faceplate you can grab in the three jaw chuck (Even if you have to change out the chuck for the faceplate, it's still faster).

  20. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    6,734
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    736
    Likes (Received)
    2316

    Default

    I can't imagine not using the lathe.

    Unless the lathe you have is too small.

  21. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Temecula, Ca
    Posts
    2,737
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1242
    Likes (Received)
    3556

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    I can't imagine not using the lathe.

    Unless the lathe you have is too small.
    I have a customer who send me some arms to put the ring grooves in. They're a conventional shop with no CNC. Why don't they just chuck it up on a lathe? Maybe because it's 4 feet long.

  22. Likes HuFlungDung liked this post
  23. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Batavia, IL USA
    Posts
    1,991
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    57
    Likes (Received)
    64

    Default

    Waldes Truarc used to make an internal grooving tool that used custom HSS cutters. I have what looks like a salesman's sample with part of the body cut away to show the internals. Interesting gadget.

    waldes-truarc-grooving-tool-long-island-city-ad-1953-ny-displaypic.jpg


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •