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    Default Speeds and feeds

    I'm doing side milling and I'm trying to speed it up if possible. Looking for suggested on speeds(rpm) and feeds. I'm running a finish cut of .050 on .187 thick material with a .500 carbide end mill. Currently running a feed rate of 1.7 IPM and spindle speed of 300 rpm

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    What is the material that you have to run so slow?

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    How is the work being held ? What sort of machine are we talking here ?


    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qualitymachinein View Post
    Currently running a feed rate of 1.7 IPM and spindle speed of 300 rpm
    Huh? That's 40 SFM, with a carbide endmill? Steel would be OK with 10x that.

    Regards.

    Mike

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    Its 1018. Running on a Bridgeport with a 1 HP motor. I've only been machining several years with no formal training and I'm running a program setup previously by someone else. An old school guy that ran everything slow.

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    It's in a fixture held down with screws. It's an actuator switch that's about .825 wide and 3.0 long.

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    You might have a look at FSWizard in the AppStore. I've found it very helpful.
    gm.

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    I actually did that and its saying a feed rate of 21 in/min which seems really fast?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qualitymachinein View Post
    It's in a fixture held down with screws. It's an actuator switch that's about .825 wide and 3.0 long.
    10x both feeds and speeds would be a pretty good starting point, if your holding it rigid enough, and if you have the spindle speed.

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    I'll start there. Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qualitymachinein View Post
    Its 1018. Running on a Bridgeport with a 1 HP motor. I've only been machining several years with no formal training and I'm running a program setup previously by someone else. An old school guy that ran everything slow.
    Was the old guy paid by the piece or the hour ?

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    You could run high speed steel and still over double you feeds and speeds.

    That's almost 5 minutes to go around the part

    What is your max RPM? I can't see HP being even close to a limiting factor on such a small cut. Your bearings and belts are likely using more HP than your cutter currently is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    You could run high speed steel and still over double you feeds and speeds.

    That's almost 5 minutes to go around the part

    What is your max RPM? I can't see HP being even close to a limiting factor on such a small cut. Your bearings and belts are likely using more HP than your cutter currently is.
    He's boring the part to death.....

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    Although HSM Advisor is good,,great,,,I would check it out,but remember those are for optimum conditions.The big thing about almost all feeds and speeds charts or apps,,usually involves COOLANT...So,my advise is run it hard and see what you can get away with,,remember the sounds,because an experienced Machinist can adjust thing just by sound.

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    i like to use the FSW mostly for mill rpm and then feed what it likes since im guessing anyhow cause my old as dirt BP has a broke down geared power feed. one of these days i ll fix it or get a new unit. my BP is clapped out but its the high speed head that topps out at like 5600rpm. being a full time knife maker that makes smaller carbide cutters right in range for most of my work

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    He's boring the part to death.....
    I don't recall anything about holes and boring....

    Seriously though, I rarely look at much in the way of references other than maybe the manufacturers SFM recommendations. Depending on what the cutting conditions and tool are you should develop an idea of what your want you chip load to be. From there its pretty simple math that can be rounded and done in your head. That gets me plenty close enough for most job shop work. If its a run or parts and a lot of material has to come off I will keep pushing till either the tool breaks, I run out of HP or cutter life becomes to short to be cost effective. Then I'll back it off a notch and let her eat.

    For a 1/2" carbide endmill I would conservatively start around 3000 RPM something like 20 IPM and then very soon be reposting the program when 200% federate override wasn't enough. Not sure what kind of surface finish you are trying to achieve but more flutes equals more faster or better finish. But I would likely be running a 1/4" carbide tool for what you are doing as they are oodles cheaper and plenty big enough. Plus smaller dia means more rpm which means faster feed since your chip load will be dictated by surface finish rather than tool strength.

  20. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    I don't recall anything about holes and boring....

    .
    It's the machinist version of "Watching Paint Dry"....


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