Stainless SHCS Torque Specs
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  1. #1
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    Default Stainless SHCS Torque Specs

    I’m having trouble finding torque specs for M5 stainless SHCS. I can find info on other grades but can’t find anything on stainless. Anyone have any good resources?

    Take it easy on me with this possibly elementary question. Haha


    Thanks!

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    M5 usually denotes the size of the fastener, of course I am no expert on stainless steel specs. There are a grades A2-70 and A4-70 and A2-80 and A4-80. An M5 70's torque are 3.3 ft/lb while the 80's are 4.8 ft/lb. Not sure I have helped or hurt on this reply.

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    That info is readily available on the internet. All you need to do is search for it. You should have done that before posting here.

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    Google "holokrome" and see if that helps.

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    Can't go wrong with the German torque spec....guttntite

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    Torques values for cap screws are determined by the strength of the threaded hole the screw is engaging. Torques values for bolts are published in charts and available in most publicans furnished by the fastener manufacturer. If your application is critical, or if you want to apply maximum holding capacity, you need to stress test the joint to failure and determine the torque required.

    Bolts have nuts, screws do not.

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