Steel tubing type for tractor tie rod
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  1. #1
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    Default Steel tubing type for tractor tie rod

    Somehow my brother bent the tie rod on our John Deere tractor I think he hit a stump but who the hell knows
    Iíve straightened it to get me by for now but itís worn flat in spots where it was rubbing after it bent and he kept using it
    Deere does not sell just the tube only the assembly which is 350$
    Old rod is 1.250 od and .930 Id, just under 3Ē3 feet long . threaded on both ends
    Should I use 1018 or would moving up to cromoly provide any worthwhile benefit.

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    I have replaced a few just using of the shelf dom tubing.
    something has to give in a bind and tie rods are cheaper than spindles.

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    Chro-mo will be somewhat stronger, but if there's no signs of mechanical failure other than the bend you may not gain anything from using it. I'd go with whatever you can get cheapest, maybe make two while you're set up for it.

    Are the ends swaged, or are they direct tapped into the straight bore?

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    Direct tapped
    Threaded about 2Ē deep on each end
    May even just cut the ends off and weld them on a new tube
    Our old tractors tie rod was made that way
    Prob be quicker than single pointing both ends

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    Quote Originally Posted by akajun View Post
    May even just cut the ends off and weld them on a new tube
    Our old tractors tie rod was made that way
    Prob be quicker than single pointing both ends
    Go for it. This is a low-speed application, if the weld fails there shouldn't be any huge risk. Unless...

    Does this tractor ever go on public roads? In that case, maybe it would be better to stay with threading the new tube.

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    No itís a deer camp tractor gravel roads only but itís pretty hilly
    Guess Iíll thread it and be done

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    Sounds good. When you get it finished, post pics of the bent and new tie rods.

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    Don's Tractor Salvage, Beattie,Kansas. 785-353-2581 John Deere is all he does.

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    I have a couple of Ford tractors.
    On my 3000 with power steering to replace the rear tie rod end you have to buy the complete drag link. I just bought the rear tie rod end from a non PS model, cut the old one off and welded the new one on. Cost was about $15 instead of over $200. I ground it nice and used a bit of bondo. Then prime and paint. It's been at least 15 years since I did that and no problems.
    On my tractor you do need to note where the rod ends point. Mine are about 90 degrees apart, some are 180 so check that. Maybe my drawing will help show what I mean.20210619_143750.jpg.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultradog MN View Post
    I have a couple of Ford tractors.
    On my 3000 with power steering to replace the rear tie rod end you have to buy the complete drag link. I just bought the rear tie rod end from a non PS model, cut the old one off and welded the new one on. Cost was about $15 instead of over $200. I ground it nice and used a bit of bondo. Then prime and paint. It's been at least 15 years since I did that and no problems.
    On my tractor you do need to note where the rod ends point. Mine are about 90 degrees apart, some are 180 so check that. Maybe my drawing will help show what I mean.20210619_143750.jpg.
    Thatís not important on mine
    This is the bar that connects the two knuckles and adjusts toe in
    The tie rod end direction is not important

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    Just about any farm store can get parts like this. What model is it? I have a catalog.

    Ed.

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    The hardcore jeep guys use 4140 DOM in the exact size you said your tractor has. Search the ads on pirate 4x4 or go online metals.com, they have it pretty cheap.

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    If you can get some tube with an ID of 1.25 the you can cut off the old threaded ends, slide then inside the new tube and weld them in.

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    One end could be left hand threads. Might want to check that before you do any threading.

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    Don't forget to check the toe-in. I would guess about 1/8".

    JH

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    All steel tubing of the same dimensions will display similar stiffness in bending, High strength alloys etc will carry a greater loading before deformation, but they will be more difficult to straighten.

    As long as there are more than about 6 threads engaged in the working ends, no alloy offers superior characteristics in regard to "strength", in this application.

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    It may be cheaper to buy solid rod and drill and tap the ends. The extra weight should not be a big deal on a farm tractor. Or use smaller diameter solid rod of equal strength and weld threaded sleeves onto the ends.
    Bill D

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    Somehow my brother bent the tie rod on our John Deere tractor

    Ya, that's what keeps happening to me. It's my damn brother.

    I've always used 4130 for tie rods. Could be overkill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    Somehow my brother bent the tie rod on our John Deere tractor

    Ya, that's what keeps happening to me. It's my damn brother.

    I've always used 4130 for tie rods. Could be overkill.
    Overkill means something more expensive breaks next time. You need a fuse in the system. Make it a cheaper part.

    Ed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atex57 View Post
    Overkill means something more expensive breaks next time. You need a fuse in the system. Make it a cheaper part.

    Ed.
    OK, make it out of an old garage door spring then. Nothing breaks


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