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  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Why do so many long time machinists turn out to be grumpy and intolerant?
    Is this a trade disease or a personality type that make's for good machinists?
    Bob
    Long term exposure to aluminum.

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  3. #182
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    "Why do so many long time machinists turn out to be grumpy and intolerant?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Long term exposure to aluminum.
    Long term exposure to newbies.

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  5. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by ezduzit View Post
    "Why do so many long time machinists turn out to be grumpy and intolerant?"



    Long term exposure to newbies.
    long term, period

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    Still it is difficult directing the building of a turbo encabulator with the hobby machinist only having a budget China lathe and never reading the book How to Run a Lathe .
    Perhaps running the critical parts between centers or out of a steady might be good with the compound at 29.5 degrees and the bed level angle set at .0000t43" in metric.

    ge turbo encabulator original pdf - Video Search Results

    Plans
    ge turbo encabulator - Yahoo Image Search Results

    Working model photo:
    ge turbo encabulator - Yahoo Image Search Results

    Perhaps the only solution.
    ge turbo encabulator - Yahoo Image Search Results

  8. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    LOL! I DO the "da terd" degree TO "Inglush" at my leisure for the fun of it!

    As to the Juris Doctor? First one I ever knew well, I was hiring out of COMSAT. "Honour thy Father" he'd done the obligatory JD, Georgetown Law.

    Then he said "OK, Dad, I did what you wanted me to do. Now I'm going to do what I want to do!" And off he went to sit an Engineering Degree at Dartmouth, command a radar picket ship, US Navy!

    THEN COMSAT, then I, hired him for skills that PAID better!

    Swings and roundabouts. About 15 years went by and I came to work for HIS company. After departure? Put my former Finance Manager - already a dual-track CPA/Chartered Accountant, into ... would you believe?

    Georgetown Law!

    But he was by then already a CFO and developer of new companies - also younger by far than I - works, yet today, at Corporate Director level!

    Useful lore and useful folks are whatever they are and found wherever yah find them.


    Well, I wasn't graced with the funds for a place like Georgetown so I did the night school routine. Once I started practicing, it paid for a mill, lathe tooling and some welders. That made it worthwhile. LOL.

    Once I got some machines and started making motorcycle parts that I sold on eBay I began to understand why machinists are so grumpy.

    Everyone knows the term, "Gnarled old machinist". The get "gnarled" answering foolish questions.


  9. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman109 View Post
    Well, I wasn't graced with the funds for a place like Georgetown so I did the night school routine. Once I started practicing, it paid for a mill, lathe tooling and some welders. That made it worthwhile. LOL.

    Once I got some machines and started making motorcycle parts that I sold on eBay I began to understand why machinists are so grumpy.

    Everyone knows the term, "Gnarled old machinist". The get "gnarled" answering foolish questions.

    Did it the other way 'round.

    Work - as a machinist, but not-only, 2d or 3d shift - paid for whatever University courses "days", as I felt might be helpful as to being able to make wiser hiring decisions.

    After 'nam, work, "days", GI bill "nights" filled in more-useful tools, yet. Thereafter, if I needed a course, I made the time and took it. Or hired a conference center, brought in the experts, and/or did it myself, training a whole team.

    Enlisting better folks than others did, finding better mentors and "bosses" than others did, then developing the best out of what I HAD, not WISHED I had, ADAPTING faster than others did, led to teams better able to deliver and prevail than whomever was in second place, any of many industries.

    More fun, that "dynamic". Stay "hull down" so fewer annoying folks know you are even in the game, yah have more free-time to make your next HIGHERS wealthy heroes. Bet yah can replicate that off stock options as much as wages? Yah get to SELECT your next mentor, prove it again, each go, never go bored nor hungry, either one.

    Pragmatic "real education" came from genuine master practitioners, not so much "Professors".

    Even paid rather well.

    But fun, finding more and better "mentors", learning new things from them, better and faster each go were always more important than money.

    They still are. They will never NOT be.

    "Adequate" wealth just sorta "happens" as a byproduct of the fun when you love finding NEW challenges, learning and growing from more, new, better skilled folk, inspiring and sharing the fun of it all with the next round of thirsty seekers.

    Work hard. Learn fast. Play at the sharing of it hardest of all!

    Last edited by thermite; 01-23-2020 at 12:48 PM.

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  11. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Please, do not try to interject sense into this thread...it'll only complicate things.
    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    OBSERVATION:

    You hard working guys who do not have the time to waste on talking about hobby grade machines have spent time on 163 posts talking about how to handle them.

    You DO know that you can just ignore them. Don't you?
    Only a few years ago this thread would have been locked before getting to page 4 for "idle chit chat". I miss those days.

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  13. #188
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    Well before it gets locked Ill ask this.Does the USA still make good old iron.?Not a sarcastic question,just curious.If not wont there be a day when maybe all machines are grizzly types.
    Where Im from you dont exactly get anything except asian stuff.

    But I think its a dying art anyway. I wonder how many manual machinists under forty exist.? I bet most machinists of today cant operate any machine if it doesnt have buttons.

    I learnt a long time ago that you can learn something from someone you would never expect would teach you something new.I also bet you that some old school hobbiests /part time machinests are far more skilled especially in problem solving than machinists of today.Guys in darkest Africa or some unpronounceable town in Russia may teach hot shot machinists a thing or two on some kak asian machine.

    LOL it brings back memories of one of my first posts here that got locked. I asked how to go about making a hob for machining a bandsaw worm and wheel.The thread got locked because of the asian bandsaw.It made no difference that it was made on a lowly emco v 13 and a holke mill using a metachecnica dividing head. I thought it was quite a useful thread and could help someone out in a jam.John Stevenson helped me out. He was a good guy and didnt turn his nose up at me cause Im a hobbiest.

    I realize this is a huge site and becomes overloaded and bombarded with what can be time wasting threads from noobies.Maybe a Nooby,hobby and asian machine thread combined will keep it from clogging the general questions up is a good idea.

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  15. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Well before it gets locked Ill ask this.Does the USA still make good old iron.?Not a sarcastic question,just curious.If not wont there be a day when maybe all machines are grizzly types.
    Where Im from you dont exactly get anything except asian stuff.

    But I think its a dying art anyway. I wonder how many manual machinists under forty exist.? I bet most machinists of today cant operate any machine if it doesnt have buttons.

    I learnt a long time ago that you can learn something from someone you would never expect would teach you something new.I also bet you that some old school hobbiests /part time machinests are far more skilled especially in problem solving than machinists of today.Guys in darkest Africa or some unpronounceable town in Russia may teach hot shot machinists a thing or two on some kak asian machine.

    LOL it brings back memories of one of my first posts here that got locked. I asked how to go about making a hob for machining a bandsaw worm and wheel.The thread got locked because of the asian bandsaw.It made no difference that it was made on a lowly emco v 13 and a holke mill using a metachecnica dividing head. I thought it was quite a useful thread and could help someone out in a jam.John Stevenson helped me out. He was a good guy and didnt turn his nose up at me cause Im a hobbiest.

    I realize this is a huge site and becomes overloaded and bombarded with what can be time wasting threads from noobies.Maybe a Nooby,hobby and asian machine thread combined will keep it from clogging the general questions up is a good idea.
    38...use a Bridgeport nearly every day. I've been using them and lathes for 16 years now.

  16. #190
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    Wait, wait wait...






    Do nothing.
    Just let it be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I realize this is a huge site and becomes overloaded and bombarded with what can be time wasting threads from noobies.Maybe a Nooby,hobby and asian machine thread combined will keep it from clogging the general questions up is a good idea.
    How can you get them to use it? They don't read the rules now.

    Bill

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  19. #192
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    Don't say Sherline?

    I am a professional machinist and have made lots of money in my shop using Sherline machines. The machine is sized perfectly for the parts I make. Yes, these parts I finish on the Sherline lathe could be made on a Monarch 10ee. But the Sherline does fine. The Sherline CNC milling machines can cut PEEK all day long for years on end. No problem. Every year or so I tear one down and repair it for $100 or so.

    It's not the machine, it's the machinist.

    P.S. I have another account and can't login as it's been a few years since I posted last and I forgot the details. So I made a new account. I've lurked here and/or posted here since around 2005 or so.

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Just make the rules clear:

    1) don't say atlas
    2) don't say unimat (sherline)
    3) don't say shaper
    4) don't be an askhole.

  20. #193
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    I've never looked at the sherline machines until just now... If it works for you so be it...I'd probably get a mini mill instead though lol

  21. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    I've never looked at the sherline machines until just now... If it works for you so be it...I'd probably get a mini mill instead though lol


    Next you'll be buying a "router"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post


    Next you'll be buying a "router"
    Nah mini mill or bust

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    Quote Originally Posted by reifsnyderb View Post
    Don't say Sherline?

    I am a professional machinist and have made lots of money in my shop using Sherline machines. The machine is sized perfectly for the parts I make. Yes, these parts I finish on the Sherline lathe could be made on a Monarch 10ee. But the Sherline does fine. The Sherline CNC milling machines can cut PEEK all day long for years on end. No problem. Every year or so I tear one down and repair it for $100 or so.

    It's not the machine, it's the machinist.

    P.S. I have another account and can't login as it's been a few years since I posted last and I forgot the details. So I made a new account. I've lurked here and/or posted here since around 2005 or so.
    the living proof that it is the machinist and not the machine
    YouTube

  24. #197
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    Probably could just rename the southbend section, seems like it's all hobby guys with hobby machines in there these days.

  25. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Probably could just rename the southbend section, seems like it's all hobby guys with hobby machines in there these days.
    Wow, that a thought.
    My Southbend 14 and a half and I have a 52 year old relationship, do you have any relationships machine tool or otherwise that old with love and respect.
    Any retired machinist is by definition a hobby guy and more than a few of them here.
    It's the new hobby guys who raise ire but I'm not sure why.
    In the 1960's I was making parts for my mini-bike. I did not know shit but luckily others would laugh, spank when needed and help me learn.
    Certainly there were some who did the whole "You should not be touching these machines, this is over your head, we are trained professionals"

    I will never forget being the hobby kid of wonder in this world, the help given and the shit on times by a machinist who believed he was cast at the right hand of God.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Wow, that a thought.
    My Southbend 14 and a half and I have a 52 year old relationship, do you have any relationships machine tool or otherwise that old with love and respect.
    Any retired machinist is by definition a hobby guy and more than a few of them here.
    It's the new hobby guys who raise ire but I'm not sure why.
    In the 1960's I was making parts for my mini-bike. I did not know shit but luckily others would laugh, spank when needed and help me learn.
    Certainly there were some who did the whole "You should not be touching these machines, this is over your head, we are trained professionals"

    I will never forget being the hobby kid, the help given and the shit on.
    Bob
    Learned on a 9"...it's definitely a hobby tool.


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