Switch material from aluminum to magnesium alloy - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Make it from Beryllium

    Density similar to magnesium, tensile strength good as CrMo steel, 5x stiffness of aluminum...

    Toxicity could be a slight downside
    Or more Properly AlBeMet. You could also go for thoriated magnesium like the old BOMARC airframes, all the flammability and radioactive to boot.

  2. #42
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    Well, if it's going to explode, it might as well spew radioactivity all over the place.

    Seriously, this may not be a dead end yet. I think I have a way to isolate any possible ignition sources and still use the magnesium alloy where it can do me the most good.

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  4. #43
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    Seriously, we used to make a lot of sounding rocket parts from AZ31B, the biggest drawback these days is the lack of people used to working with it. We have since switched a lot of structure over to carbon.

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    Have you considered using some sort of plastic?

    Sounds like it could solve all of your problems if the application can tolerate it.

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnl View Post
    Seriously, we used to make a lot of sounding rocket parts from AZ31B, the biggest drawback these days is the lack of people used to working with it. We have since switched a lot of structure over to carbon.
    Yup, we did sounding rockets and balloon packages. Ah, the good old days...

    I still have some AZ31B left over from some satellite parts, still remember how to cut it safely. Not all the old skills are lost.

  7. #46
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    Or anodized magnesium.

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    High-strength magnesium-lithium alloy weighs half as much as aluminum
    January 01, 2016
    Source: ASM International
    The University of New South Wales and Monash University, Australia, announce that a team of researchers has developed a high-strength magnesium-lithium alloy with density of 1.4 g/cm3, 50% less than aluminum and 30% less than magnesium. The researchers have shown that the alloy forms a protective layer of carbonate-rich film upon exposure to air, making it immune to corrosion. The finding is published online in the 19 October edition of Nature Materials.


    High-strength magnesium-lithium alloy weighs half as much as aluminum - ASM International

    I wonder what the fire hazards would be?

  9. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by David_M View Post
    High-strength magnesium-lithium alloy weighs half as much as aluminum
    January 01, 2016
    Source: ASM International
    The University of New South Wales and Monash University, Australia, announce that a team of researchers has developed a high-strength magnesium-lithium alloy with density of 1.4 g/cm3, 50% less than aluminum and 30% less than magnesium. The researchers have shown that the alloy forms a protective layer of carbonate-rich film upon exposure to air, making it immune to corrosion. The finding is published online in the 19 October edition of Nature Materials.


    High-strength magnesium-lithium alloy weighs half as much as aluminum - ASM International

    I wonder what the fire hazards would be?
    If you were feeling bipolar you could lick the lithium carbonate layer.

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  11. #49
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    I bet using it would be a wallet hazard!

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  13. #50
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    Some of the motorcycles that were around when I started riding way back when had high percentages of magnesium in their engine parts. Harley-Davidson used an alloy called Dow Metal (from Dow Chemical I guess) in their racing bike crankcases and pistons. Dow metal is usually 85% magnesium with the remainder aluminum and manganese. They wanted the lightness of course, at the expense of high flammability.

    Matchless, in their 350cc "Boy Racer" road racing bike used 100% magnesium in the crankcases for lightness.

    I once saw a Matchless racer catch fire in the pits and burn completely out. The crankcases were completely burned up to the point where the flywheels fell out onto the ground. No one had a fire extinguisher as I recall.

    Unless you really need magnesium in your design, you might want to reconsider.

  14. #51
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    How about 60% carbon fiber PEEK?
    PEEK composite medical grade - TECATEC MT | Ensinger

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  16. #52
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    It will depend on the environment as to whether it's a hazard or not. Isolate it correctly and it will be fine. Most older chainsaws were made with a large amount of magnesium. Basically the entire case of the saw.


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