Taking down for scrap, a 600 ton four post mechanical press
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 95
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    522
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    97
    Likes (Received)
    108

    Default Taking down for scrap, a 600 ton four post mechanical press

    Attached is a picture.

    This is a 600 ton capacity mechanical press with bed dimensions of 144" by 48". Weight 478,000 lbs. It sits about 6 feet deep in a pit. I need to cut it up for scrap.

    I am a rigger and a scrapper, however I have never done anything this size!

    I do have some equipment, such as 60-80k rigger lift and 60-80k versa lift, as well as scrap torches. But still not sure what is the best way to take this down. It is about 18-20 feet tall. It is held together by tie rods.

    I am thinking, first, to "undress" the press and drop everything down, remove all motors, shafts, tanks, and flywheels. Then remove all covers.

    Then drop the hammer down, so that it would lay on timbers laid on top of the bolster plate.

    Then cut the tie rods on top. (I forgot to check the pit but they might fall down into the pit through the press, or they might not.

    After that the crown should be more manageable. Put some timbers on top of forks and lift up the crown (about 100k or maybe less if everything is dropped from it) with two big forklifts. If tie rods still remain, just lift up a couple inches, brace, then torch cut tie rods. Take the crown out and lower down. After that everything else can be done relatively easily.

    Any other ideas?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cci-press.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,747
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2264
    Likes (Received)
    1156

    Default

    How do you eat an elephant?

    One bite at a time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    19,163
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11697

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ichudov View Post
    Attached is a picture.

    This is a 600 ton capacity mechanical press with bed dimensions of 144" by 48". Weight 478,000 lbs. It sits about 6 feet deep in a pit. I need to cut it up for scrap.

    I am a rigger and a scrapper, however I have never done anything this size!

    I do have some equipment, such as 60-80k rigger lift and 60-80k versa lift, as well as scrap torches. But still not sure what is the best way to take this down. It is about 18-20 feet tall. It is held together by tie rods.

    I am thinking, first, to "undress" the press and drop everything down, remove all motors, shafts, tanks, and flywheels. Then remove all covers.

    Then drop the hammer down, so that it would lay on timbers laid on top of the bolster plate.

    Then cut the tie rods on top. (I forgot to check the pit but they might fall down into the pit through the press, or they might not.

    After that the crown should be more manageable. Put some timbers on top of forks and lift up the crown (about 100k or maybe less if everything is dropped from it) with two big forklifts. If tie rods still remain, just lift up a couple inches, brace, then torch cut tie rods. Take the crown out and lower down. After that everything else can be done relatively easily.

    Any other ideas?
    Common as Hell need in the aftermath of warfare or major civil building highway or railway bridge failures, lock & dam doors, and Tainter gates damaged by storm-driven navigable-river barges.

    Tainter gate - Wikipedia

    The "tool" you need for the hairest part is "thermate" // Thermite cutting charges, remote initiated.

    Modern Uses of Thermite for Demolition and their applicability to the WTC | Metabunk

    Stock in trade for Combat Engineers or their civilian counterpart commercial structure demolition experts, pretty much since Iron was first used in a bridge.

    If you are neither? Call one in when it gets down to that last and most dangerous part. No NEED of a human inside the zone with a torch atall.

    ELSE arrange enough heavy lift to take it out, vertically.

    If you need remotely-removable temp bracing, as the lock at Charleroi, PA needed?

    Two steel plates. Bond with amorphous Sulfur. Remote initiated incendiary burns it out. Bracing drops free. Or almost free. Chains are OK. But again - key factor is no human inside the zone to BE at-risk.

    Really weird load? Bear the temp load against a structure of dry-ice slabs. Place a steam lance. Remote valve. The rest should be obvious?



    Specialty or not, Thermate could be cheaper, faster, and far less hairy, crew-risk-wise.

    BTDTGTTS, even taught the course at Belvoir, two generations in a row.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,310
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17638
    Likes (Received)
    1016

    Default

    To get the scrap yard to take the big pieces, probably have to cut them to pieces with an oxygen lance.

    A friend of mine got a call like yours... a scrap dealer in Tulsa got ahold of him and said they had a machine, setting in a pit like yours, that they were given because the buildings new owner had no way of getting it out.

    Scrap dealer paid him to come down and cut up the huge pieces with an oxygen lance.

    They brought machines and help and got the big pieces of the base and ram outside and sat them up on cribbed railroad ties... he stood down below and gouged and sliced and cut~ from the sides and bottoms... with great puddles of molten steel/slag piling up on the ground below the cut.. til he got them cut into the sizes they desired. I think he said 10,000 pound chunks~ he's dead and I can't call him and refresh my memory!

  5. Likes digger doug, ichudov liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Missoula Mt
    Posts
    1,273
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    55
    Likes (Received)
    567

    Default

    Do all the hazmat first... drain everything... remove all lines, valves ect, Could ruin your day if it catches on fire...Phil

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    333
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    37

    Default

    If you have to ask how, maybe you should give the job to someone who knows how.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    new plymouth id
    Posts
    518
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    41
    Likes (Received)
    135

    Default

    I dont know how much damage to the site you are aloud to do if damdage to the ground around is okay. i would start from the top with a man basket and start cutting. a couple of bottles of liquid oxygen and some large tips Should get you several semi loads of steel There is all kind of cool stuff for scrapping but as a 17 year old working at a scrap yard they would start me cutting On old d9s Oxy and propane just start at the top turn it into #1 as its cut apart that way its only handled once
    I second though makIng sure all fluids and flammables are dealt with first

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    19,163
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11697

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rollerman View Post
    If you have to ask how, maybe you should give the job to someone who knows how.
    Ermm.. Igor probably knows several "how".

    My bet, he's just being more prudent than the average polar bear.

    How did you THINK he made it to age 95 , over a dozen years of it "Right here, on PM" ?


  10. Likes kustomizer, Newman109, ichudov liked this post
  11. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    St, Paul MN
    Posts
    613
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    91
    Likes (Received)
    104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rollerman View Post
    If you have to ask how, maybe you should give the job to someone who knows how.
    That’s helpful.

    Or ask and learn .

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21,204
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have a scrapper friend do one very similar.

    he had the 60k lb forklift, stuffed forks in just under the top, said he lifted to top "up" and lanced off the 4 columns.
    I was at his yard, and that whole top (motor ,flywheels & clutch) was all sitting
    on a lowboy.

    I think the biggest problem, is setting the pit on fire, as your pretty sure it's
    filled with grease and oil.

  13. Likes Garwood, Steven-Canada liked this post
  14. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    wales.uk
    Posts
    1,618
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    325
    Likes (Received)
    352

    Default

    The plattens and tie rods a way thicker than oxy propane, plus probably cast iron on the plattens, so your into oxy Lance or packed Lance as you like, the oil in it a real hazard, the alternate is deconstruction, crane, either way strip till there’s nothing left to strip, cut till there’s nothing left a torch can do then Lance what’s left, if you do think worst case, what the hell is going up in flames, soak the area, keep fire hoses handy,
    Mark

  15. Likes ichudov liked this post
  16. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Connecticut
    Posts
    72
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default

    Okay. Usually they drop the tie rods down from the top, heat them to stretch and then torque the nuts while stretched so that there is a preload between the bed, uprights, and crown. You should be able to reverse the process either with tierod heaters or if you have access to the tie rods around the uprights you can usually stretch them with an torch. Prior to that though, you'll want to take the slide out. Loosen the connection rods on the crankshaft and drop it down on blocks. Take the front or rear gibs off and remove the ram with forklift. You may have to take the connection rods out or at the very least you want to run the shutheight adjustment all the way up so that the connections clear the crown. I think you can count on the ram on that machine running in the 20 to 30,000 lbs range. Once the slide is out you can start stripping the crown down ideally to just the weldment. If you can pull the tie rods you don't have to lift as high. However there is some advantage in leaving them engaged with the uprights so the uprights can't tip over when you lift the crown off.

  17. Likes ichudov, Matt_Maguire liked this post
  18. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,195
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    119

    Default

    Be sure to post the video of the operation.

  19. Likes ichudov, TFPace, rotarySMP, jerholz, pavt and 1 others liked this post
  20. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Beaverdam, Virginia
    Posts
    10,119
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1491
    Likes (Received)
    5377

    Default

    Since the biggest thing I ever scrapped weighed 4,000# I have nothing to contribute, other than be safe and the timing appears good because at least in my neck of the woods scrap prices have rebounded close to the highs of a couple years ago.

  21. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Missoula Mt
    Posts
    1,273
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    55
    Likes (Received)
    567

    Default

    "If you have to ask how, maybe you should give the job to someone who knows how. " thats BS, the owner of the press would not let just anyone in there, you need bonding, fire ins, and a track record. Its a tuff buss to get into, the op just want a few pointers, if he didnt meat the grade he would have no job, most likely he was the low bidder...Phil

  22. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    12,517
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2857
    Likes (Received)
    8697

    Default

    Some good advice so far, let me add this:

    If you have helpers or bystanders, be CERTAIN that their safety is uppermost on your mind. This means that they have the right PPE (eye protection, thermal gear if oxy cutting, etc.), but also have a clear plan for order of operation for each part of the work.

    Accurate communication is key, especially if doing multi-point lifts. Dropping a 25 ton block because of a misunderstood command is not fun...

  23. Likes ichudov liked this post
  24. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Central Florida USA
    Posts
    87
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    53

    Default

    Something I always try to remember is it was assembled. So it probably comes apart the same way.

    I would suggest that it's an expensive job and it's likely to cost more to break it apart than it's worth as scrap.

  25. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,919
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6418
    Likes (Received)
    3281

    Default

    That would be a fun project.

    Surprised no market for a 600 ton press like that? I guess I'm assuming it's in working order. Pics make it look pretty nice.

  26. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Beaverdam, Virginia
    Posts
    10,119
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1491
    Likes (Received)
    5377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csspecs View Post
    Something I always try to remember is it was assembled. So it probably comes apart the same way.

    I would suggest that it's an expensive job and it's likely to cost more to break it apart than it's worth as scrap.
    It is worth $38k delivered to a scrap yard where I am at.

  27. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    522
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    97
    Likes (Received)
    108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeE. View Post
    To get the scrap yard to take the big pieces, probably have to cut them to pieces with an oxygen lance.

    A friend of mine got a call like yours... a scrap dealer in Tulsa got ahold of him and said they had a machine, setting in a pit like yours, that they were given because the buildings new owner had no way of getting it out.

    Scrap dealer paid him to come down and cut up the huge pieces with an oxygen lance.

    They brought machines and help and got the big pieces of the base and ram outside and sat them up on cribbed railroad ties... he stood down below and gouged and sliced and cut~ from the sides and bottoms... with great puddles of molten steel/slag piling up on the ground below the cut.. til he got them cut into the sizes they desired. I think he said 10,000 pound chunks~ he's dead and I can't call him and refresh my memory!
    My scrap yard can take any size piece that I am able to bring to them. I can haul up to 64,000 lbs or so legally under my blanket oversize permit.

  28. Likes TFPace, cyanidekid liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •