Tapping Straight Holes With a Hand Drill - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Practice, practice, practice. I've tapped many holes up to 3/8" with a dewalt 18 volt drill and it takes practice and attention to detail to make them straight but it can be done. The keyless chuck on the dewalt usually won't to through in steel without having to reverse it and take a couple of more whacks at it. Depending on what the jot is I sometimes use a slightly larger tap drill.

  2. #22
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    "Would a Pem nut be a good option?"


    Usually with those you need access to both sides.

    Something else to think about is 2 flt drills like to make triangle holes in metal thinner than their dia., worse when used in a hand drill

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Econdron View Post
    What was somewhat interesting is I started digging into this a little more, some of the products have all the holes perfectly straight, while most of the other products have all crooked holes. It seems to be there are a handful of employees here who can tap a straight hole, while the rest are tapping crooked. I'm actually now leaning more towards the view that people are just running the tap in crooked. Maybe a simple guide block is the way to go.



    We actually use rivet nuts quite a bit on bolt-together assemblies, I would personally love to use this option for all of the leveling inserts, however many of our customers for whatever reason often choose to NOT use the leveling feet, they like the look of the metal directly contacting the floor. The rivet nuts add about 0.08" or so, so it's not much, but it's enough that we would get complaints about the "awkward" protrusion on the bottom when not being used with levelers.



    Yup, with an end cap, recess it in .125 or so.
    Along a length of tube ? simply make up some felt or rubber washers with the rivnut hole in it.

  4. #24
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    D:
    The stock 3-taps in one box have a loose tap as the first option.
    Then finish with an industrial plug machine tap in the cordless drill.

    Iīve run through 2 Hitachi drills (bought more (2nd hand)) and swapped chucks on them once (new real jacobs chucks).
    Taps cost around 15€ in Spain from industrial suppliers in range sub 10 mm.

    Celesa Bluemaster, Tivoly, JMC, Izar, others..
    Izar is the best known and perhaps the one I prefer.

    The machine taps are necked down and tend to break at the neck and not inside the workpiece.
    So they can be gotten out in about 2/3 of cases.
    My steel workpieces tend to be upto 2.2 m long, over 7 feet, and sometimes heavy, 80-140 kg or so.

    For *most* stuff always buying the "best" tool aka mercedes-class is a bad idea- unless Your business is making huge profits.
    If it is, putting some of the profits in distributed infrastructure is a good idea.
    Save on taxes, often 40% of ticket price, and being prepared to do all sorts of new work in the future if the conditions change makes a lot of sense.
    And best-quality tools keep their value, and have a very long useful life around 20 years, mostly.

    For *some* stuff it is the best idea ever to buy the best.
    Where You make (good) real money in producing stuff sometimes the best tools even at outrageous prices are exactly the best choice.

    Like an NSK aka Nakanishi spindle if you need to do hand-held deburring or small-spindle work.
    It is just absolutely superb, and vastly better than anything else I know of.
    6000$ for a handheld 400W (1200W) 40 mm D milling spindle with 6 mm capacity.
    But 1 micron runout, silent, near-silent at 40.000 rpm (even 60.000 rpm but I have not tried one at 60k).

    If You need to do work like that, You really, really want to get an NSK spindle.
    Just No Comparison.
    Look up NSK locally and go see one at their rep.
    I suggest You will be Very Impressed and amazed with NSK and-or Hitachi lion industrial-level tools.
    The cheap Hitachi stuff -- not relevant.

    Edit:
    Hitachi seems to have sold out to another brand - Metabo in 2018.
    Not sure how that will work out in the future.
    Or if the good Hitachi stuff will ever be made again.

    A lot of brands used to make great stuff that was expensive, and when the brand was bought the quality dropped by 90%.
    In the US craftsman comes to mind (by reports).
    Globally, Stanley used to make good stuff long ago.

    Here is a link to Hitachi with 2 6 amp-hr batteries for 370Ģ.
    Hitachi DV18DBXL/JX 18 V Cordless Brushless Combi Drill with 2 x 6 A Battery - Green (2-Piece): Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools
    130 Nm of torque - and You want torque for tapping.
    And real proper jacobs made steel chuks with 0.02/3 mm runout.


    Quote Originally Posted by DanielG View Post
    Are these available off the shelf, or did you have them made?

  5. #25
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    Tap guides are a pain in the ass.
    And I think unnecessary.
    And slow.
    And unless bolted in, may not work.

    As You saw, some employees routinely tap straight, already.

    Suggest 1-2 classes on tapping, of 10 mins each.
    Suggest one practice / training at 12 o clock and the next at closing, on work time (very important).
    Have someone good and pleasant explain why and how to tap straight - and get people to practice, with simple gages.
    Pleasant is very important.
    Short class is very important.

    An oversize threaded long bolt that is slightly tight will indicate if the hole is straight, for example.
    You could laquer or paint a few dozen bolts grade 12.9 (US grade 8) so they are tight.

    Give prizes.
    Money.
    300$ to the best, 200$ to the most-improved.
    50$ to everyone who completes a final test. Everyone in other words.
    The test needs to be done so everyone practices until they pass a good-quality tap test.

    Offer say hot dogs.
    *EVERYONE* will be happy if they get hot dogs and an extra 50$ cash in hand.
    For less than a grand in outlay the tapping quality will vastly improve, and work output and morale will greatly improve.

    And if some struggle with the tapping, they will thereafter feel free to ask their co-workers for help, and quickly reach better standards.
    And if they donīt, their co-workers will informally lean on them to produce stuff that is up to the standards.

    It "seems" wrong but workers actually love this kind of thing and donīt get a sense of entitlement - where a clear identified mechanical object exists.
    Aka "tapping better products" or similar.

    Itīs non-confrontational and not discriminatory.
    If finger foods and bonus petty cash are involved, itīs great fun for the workers.

    And they all tend to feel involved and responsible in the future to tap better holes.
    And if some donīt, their co-workers put them to right by insisting "they gave us everything .. even hot dogs .. what else do you want .. ... now shut up and work".

    Just an idea, an opinion.
    But itīs cheap and these types of things have had good results for me in many fields and many countries and many enterprises.


    Quote Originally Posted by Econdron View Post
    What was somewhat interesting is I started digging into this a little more, some of the products have all the holes perfectly straight, while most of the other products have all crooked holes.
    It seems to be there are a handful of employees here who can tap a straight hole, while the rest are tapping crooked.
    I'm actually now leaning more towards the view that people are just running the tap in crooked. Maybe a simple guide block is the way to go.

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  7. #26
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    try this metabo battery powered tapper, and yes a guide to get it perpendicular would be good.

    GB 18 LTX BL Q I (603828890) Cordless Tappers | Metabo Power Tools

  8. #27
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    My tap chart says to use a "F" drill not a fraction.
    Bill D

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    What about a drill-tap in a tapping arm? You would have to set up the foot to be parallel to the floor, but the tapping arm would then ensure that the drill-tap was perpendicular to the foot. It would also take the torque off the operator.

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    How about one of those combined drill and tap bits. The nose is a drill then followed by the threading portion. Do it in one operation.
    How are you center punching to keep the hole centered.
    Bill D

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    I totally understand the cosmetic reasons, most of my work is on handrail parts so I feel your pain...in that case I would agree that as may others have said, some sort of drilling and tapping guides would be the best approach.

    If you could identify the guys that have issues getting the hole straight, maybe some additional training would help...maybe they don't know they're doing it wrong. That being said if they just don't care, maybe they aren't a good fit for the shop.

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  13. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    "Would a Pem nut be a good option?"


    Usually with those you need access to both sides.
    Yes, but you can do that before welding

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    Quote Originally Posted by Econdron View Post
    We actually use rivet nuts quite a bit on bolt-together assemblies, I would personally love to use this option for all of the leveling inserts, however many of our customers for whatever reason often choose to NOT use the leveling feet, they like the look of the metal directly contacting the floor. The rivet nuts add about 0.08" or so, so it's not much, but it's enough that we would get complaints about the "awkward" protrusion on the bottom when not being used with levelers.
    Counterbore for the heads ? I know, yet another operation, but if it standardized everything, and removed the crooked tappers from the equation .... ?

    And counterbores usually have pilots, so they'd most likely go straight.

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    How about a pulley tap? Long enough to give leverage and easy to eyeball square.

    Ed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheels17 View Post
    What about a drill-tap in a tapping arm? You would have to set up the foot to be parallel to the floor, but the tapping arm would then ensure that the drill-tap was perpendicular to the foot. It would also take the torque off the operator.
    I'm thinking that using TWO tapping arms - - - - one for drilling and one for tapping.
    You set them up right and Bob's your uncle and you're off to the races.
    Fast reliable and will take the pressure of the guys to have things right.

    With experience its not hard to do but that experience - - - - well it cost time AND money!

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    I use 5/16" riv nuts every day that I install in 1/8" aluminum. The brand is PWS. The flange is only 20 thousands thick and I use a simple 5/8" diameter counter bore with a 5/16" pilot shaft to enable the flange to seat flush. The diameter of the nut is 17/32" and I use a reamer for the finish cut of the hole.


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