Testing Spark Ignitor One Wire PSE-R36
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  1. #1
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    Default Testing Spark Ignitor One Wire PSE-R36

    This unit has continuity from the plug the the element that should spark.

    Is there any other test that is necessary to confirm it is in working order?

    Not exactly sure how to perform an ohms test, or if this is even necessary.

    Also, what kind of voltage is the input to this unit, this answer may be another way for me to confirm if the unit is bad.
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    If this is off a furnace it won't spark if something is bad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimybuddiesel View Post
    This unit has continuity from the plug the the element that should spark.

    Is there any other test that is necessary to confirm it is in working order?

    Not exactly sure how to perform an ohms test, or if this is even necessary.

    Also, what kind of voltage is the input to this unit, this answer may be another way for me to confirm if the unit is bad.
    W-O-W....Just WOW !

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    Is there a resistor in the wire that could be faulty?

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    The voltage will be in the thousands, but it will not appear with only one wire. There needs to be a ground. You clearly have no idea of what you are doing, so find someone who does and stop playing around before you hurt yourself.

    Bill

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    it may need only 24 volts to work so the power comes from a transformer, likely home hack testing will break it if it is/was still good. Yes, it needs two wires to work.

    Gas Furnace Spark Ignition Control Troubleshooting! - YouTube

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    I would guess 10-20k volts. Needs a ground to jump to. A local ground is good enough. Does not need to be bonded to the earth. I was surprised the ones on my BBQ actually had two fine wires in one jacket. They carried ground to the sparking unit direct from the coil not through the frame like I expected. Is the connector one or to terminals insdie the boot?
    Bill D

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    Thank you for the video reference. I figured out my problem.

    If anyone else can provide more detail of how this 24 volt input ignition control creates between 6,000 and 20,000 volts, I would appreciate the details. any details on how to test this unit with a multi meter would also be appreciated. I had difficulty finding a good online reference for this, that is why I asked the practical machinist group. Over the years I have got some great guidance from group members.

    I had already watched that video once, and went ahead and watched it again. It provide an excellent overview of the major functions of a furnace. Especially the coordination of the gas valve and the igniter, I am not sure video configuration includes the induction motor sequence, however.

    I believe that the input on the igniter is 24 volts, the model detailed is powered from a 24 volt alternating current transformer. '

    It mentions that the output at the spark point is between 6,000 and 20,000 volts, depending upon the spark gap.

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    Simple spark coil with 24 volts pulse dc in. Say 10 turns of wire on the input side with 10,000 on the output yields a theoretical 24,000 volts. Intermittent use so less worry about overheating then in a car.
    Bil lD

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    It is about amps and the watts law..

    Edison asked Tesla "Do you know what? Tesla said "Yes."

    That is an original Buck joke. I made it up. likely about 60 years ago. I can't understand why nobody gets it,

    Wait a moment I can't stop laughing, That is really funny.

    I have seen 3 lightning bolts hit within 300 feet of where I was two were within 200 feet..guess I lucky to be alive. One hit and ran down the tree just across the street as I was getting out of my car, that one about 50 feet away split the tree down the middle to make just a hairline crack, and the tree died. I am surprised it not catch on fire.

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    It is a bit clearer, now that you mentioned a coil, the photograph shows the spark igniter wire attached to a coil on the circuit board.

    I am almost embarrassed that I somehow thought the wire had a mysterious "resister" inside of it that created the 6,000 to 20,000 volt spark, from a 24 volt power source.

    getattachmentthumbnail.jpg

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    delete this

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimybuddiesel View Post
    delete this
    Yes please...all of it.

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    That looks like an igniter from an oil burner. There should be an igniter transformer that outputs 1000 volt plus to it. The second wire should attach to whatever that mounts to. It should read continuity from the wire to the electrode that comes out of the white insulator and the other electrode should have continuity to the metal shell.

    There is a control circuit that switches the input to the transformer when ignition is desired (lighting the burner).


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