Is there a name for pulleys with the grub screw recessed into the groove?
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Is there a name for pulleys with the grub screw recessed into the groove?

    Hello, I have bought a pulley which has the grub screw offset which makes it too wide for my needs - is there a name or term for pulleys which have the grub screw recessed in the belt groove so its only as wide as the groove?

    Alternatively, could I drill and tap the one I have and cut the wide part - or is there a structural reason for the extra material?

    Aluminium V Pulley B Section Single Groove Standard Keyway Australian Made - Australian Pulley Co

    This is what I have ^

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    14,555
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2798
    Likes (Received)
    4288

    Default

    Hubless pulley. Honest.

  3. Likes Gordon Heaton, woodchuckNJ, catmanjan liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Thanks for the quick answer!

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. George, Utah
    Posts
    1,262
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    817
    Likes (Received)
    851

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by catmanjan View Post
    . . .is there a structural reason for the extra material?. . .
    Naturally, if it is a stamped pulley or one with an especially thin web then a hub is a structural requirement if it is to be mounted to a cylindrical shaft. If it is made from a solid slug with straight sides and the load requirements do not mandate a long key, you can remove the hub and relocate the grub screw. The one you link to has a reduced center section so you would want to leave at least enough hub to be flush with the sides of the pulley rim. Depending on what the other side looks like you might also need to use a smaller grub screw.

  6. Likes catmanjan liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,644
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2477
    Likes (Received)
    657

    Default

    catmanjan,

    Another option is to use a pulley with a taper lock bush (if you have access to one end face of the pulley).

    Taper lock pulleys have a bush which pulls up flush with the pulley face.

    If you don't mind something a bit wider than the pulley, then the Bi-Loc (Biloc, Bi-Fit, Mi-Fit) pulleys are another option. On this system, there is a flange and bolt heads which are wider than the pulley.


    taper-lock-pulleys.jpg bi-fit-range.jpg

  8. Likes catmanjan liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Thanks, I have used taper lock pulleys before - I am trying to find one that suits my needs, unfortunately I can't get a taper lock 2" V Belt A section with 1 inch bore, I think the taper lock is too big for a pulley this size

    I will try and remanufacture mine into a hubless pulley

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    292

    Default

    In the Dodge or Martin brand, the 1008 series taper lock bushing is the smallest one that goes up to 1” bore. Unfortunately, Martin does not appear to offer the size sheave you want that will accept it. You will likely just have to drill and tap a stock bore pulley to put the set screw in the bottom of the groove like you want it.

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eureka, CA
    Posts
    4,296
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    989
    Likes (Received)
    1699

    Default

    I haven't seen every sheave ever made but I have seen a whole bunch, and not one ever had a setscrew situated in a groove...I think it's poor engineering and something that a reputable manufacturer would never do. I've done it occasionally, but I'm just a hack.

    Stuart

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    5,377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3302
    Likes (Received)
    2760

    Default

    Why would it be poor engineering? The belt does not touch the bottom of the groove.

  13. Likes Mcgyver, JohnEvans, g-coder05, digger doug liked this post
  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Americus, Georgia
    Posts
    462
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    562
    Likes (Received)
    138

    Default

    A common practice in low torque load, small machine applications.

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    5,377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3302
    Likes (Received)
    2760

    Default

    The grub screw often retains the parallel key that drives the pulley/shaft.

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    21,176
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16556
    Likes (Received)
    17216

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    Why would it be poor engineering? The belt does not touch the bottom of the groove.
    Because that radius is too tight for the relevent belt section.

  17. Likes Mark Rand liked this post
  18. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    minnesota
    Posts
    209
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    45
    Likes (Received)
    190

    Default

    Browning lists them as "steel sheaves" type 1F.

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Geilenkirchen, Germany
    Posts
    2,788
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1593
    Likes (Received)
    1453

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter S View Post
    catmanjan,

    Another option is to use a pulley with a taper lock bush (if you have access to one end face of the pulley).

    Taper lock pulleys have a bush which pulls up flush with the pulley face.

    If you don't mind something a bit wider than the pulley, then the Bi-Loc (Biloc, Bi-Fit, Mi-Fit) pulleys are another option. On this system, there is a flange and bolt heads which are wider than the pulley.


    taper-lock-pulleys.jpg bi-fit-range.jpg
    Peter, these are called taper locks and they are brilliant, but they are only available in larger sizes. However, check out Tsubaki's line of "Power Locks". They have several styles, many of which are very suitable to small shafts and pulleys, but be prepared for their very high cost. It makes your eyes water!

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    5,377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3302
    Likes (Received)
    2760

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Because that radius is too tight for the relevent belt section.

    Because, if the belt is in contact with the bottom of the groove, then it is not gripping the sheaves and will be slipping!

  21. Likes digger doug liked this post
  22. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eureka, CA
    Posts
    4,296
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    989
    Likes (Received)
    1699

    Default

    The need for a set screw in the crotch of V would indicate to me there is little or no hub to put an appropriate set screw or screws into. This would also indicate to me a single belt sheave which mean there is little axial support for the sheave. This is why I felt it was a bum deal and you would not see a sheave make for any real service with that construction. I could be all wrong on this though and would be happy to admit it.

    Stuart

  23. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    2,539
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1380
    Likes (Received)
    1246

    Default

    Alternatively, could I drill and tap the one I have and cut the wide part - or is there a structural reason for the extra material?
    When you cut off extra hub leave as much on as will cover the shaft to give lateral support.

    Would it be possible to run the hub toward the bearing or motor and adjust the system side to side to make the belt run true?

    Paul

  24. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    21,176
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16556
    Likes (Received)
    17216

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    Because, if the belt is in contact with the bottom of the groove, then it is not gripping the sheaves and will be slipping!
    I think we may be at cross purposes my statement was because an A section Vee belt is unsuited to a 2'' dia pulley as per the OPs quest. ***

    Ref Page 26 here http://www.tecnicaindustriale.net/ch...elts_gates.pdf

    *** yes I know it's done - especially on ''low end'' machinery, but it ain't right nor is it efficient.

  25. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    5,377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3302
    Likes (Received)
    2760

    Default

    Yes, AX might do the job far better.

    Myford were culprits for having vastly undersized motor pulleys.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •