Are these actually reamers?
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  1. #1
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    Default Are these actually reamers?

    Hi all, I recently bought a stack of machinist tools, some mics, spring calipers, and the like.

    I got these Allen key looking things with it, and when I was buying the lot, the guy referred to them as "German Reams" and he put great emphasis on them as good tools. I have looked online at different types of hand reamers, but cannot find anything that resembles these here.

    They look like allen wrenches as you can see, but they certainly do have a cross section that looks a bit like a reamer.

    They don't really have a significant taper, so i dont know how well they are going to ream by hand. Also some of them are pretty damaged due to rusting.

    What do you guys think of these things?

    Thanks.

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    Do they have cutting edge flutes at the OD?
    Do they measue ti some standard izs?

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    I think they look like the letter L.

    Come to think of it, I had a guy ask me awhile back if I had an 'L' reamer he could borrow. If I'd had one of these I could have helped him out.

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    I have never heard of a reamer like that . That’s not to say they were never made or don’t exist it’s just that They look a lot like Bristol type Allen wrenches . We use them with our s16 collet pads

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    I have a few taps that look similar, but never saw a reamer like that .
    ...lewie...

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    looking like some kind of allen key variant to suit something particular, need to find out what this is.

    otherwise of not much use to anyone, never seen it before.

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    The gent may have been having a larf with you, but they look like spline or Bristol wrenches to me. I'd not obsess to much about them, throw them in a drawer and if you ever come across a socket cap screw with such internal splines rather a hex or Torx give them a go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    The gent may have been having a larf with you, but they look like spline or Bristol wrenches to me. I'd not obsess to much about them, throw them in a drawer and if you ever come across a socket cap screw with such internal splines rather a hex or Torx give them a go.
    Pretty sure Milland has it - Bristol's spline keys. Once used a lot in old electronics and instrumentation (knobs, spacers, etc.). Might someday help you get some bit of kit apart.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    Pretty sure Milland has it - Bristol's spline keys. Once used a lot in old electronics and instrumentation (knobs, spacers, etc.). Might someday help you get some bit of kit apart.
    Yup, sure looks like a set of Bristol spline drives to me as well...….

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    WW2 Bristols used on a lot of radio and navy gear then, hard to find now if you need them...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by dana gear View Post
    Yup, sure looks like a set of Bristol spline drives to me as well...….

    Yup Bristol Spline Keys, and still available Sets Archives - Bristol Wrench Co.

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    There were a number of spline drive fasteners that MB, Porsche and BMW used that I still have the L shaped keys that look like those pictured. We c called them Ribe sockets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    spline or Bristol wrenches to me. I'd not obsess to much about them, throw them in a drawer and if you ever come across a socket cap screw with such internal splines rather a hex or Torx give them a go.
    +1. Not a very commonly needed tool. If you don't need 'em, put 'em on eBay.

    From wiki:


    The Bristol (or Bristol spline) screw drive is a fastener with four or six splines, but is not necessarily tamper resistant.[59] The grooves in the wrench are cut by a square-cornered broach, giving a slight undercut to the outer corners of the driver. The main advantage to this drive system is that almost all of the turning force is applied at right angles to the fastener spline face, which reduces the possibility of stripping the fastener. For this reason Bristol screw drives are often used in softer, non-ferrous metals. Compared to an Allen drive, Bristol drives are less likely to strip for the same amount of torque; however, the Bristol drive is not much more strip-resistant than a Torx drive.[citation needed] It was patented in the United States in 1913 by Dwight S. Goldwin and put into production by the Bristol Wrench Company.[60][61]

    This type of drive is commonly used in avionics, higher-end communications equipment, cameras, air brakes, construction and farm equipment, astronomy equipment, and military equipment. Variants with a pin in the center are often found in game systems, to discourage improvised attempts to use a slotted screwdriver to drive the fastener.

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