Thinking Out Loud-Which Lathe to Sell? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I think there is some truth in what Norb is saying, but for the kind of work one would do on the Pacemaker, a speed limit of 1200 isn't really restrictive. Having a half dozen lathes of that size, is a collection, not a shop. Most people can't house a collection of the larger iron, but from a financial perspective, it is probably money flushed. Your money, your choice.

    You can do small work, on a big lathe, but it can be cumbersome. Also, you loose the "feel" of it, and the immediacy of a smaller lathe. I like the Colchesters. Don't know about the clones. But If I had a bigger lathe too, my choice would be an HLVH.

    Jon P.

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    Just to set the record straight, his father was helping him aquire and build the shop when he passed(my condolences Matt). So I think his dad approved.

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    Acquire the equipment that is

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    Back on topic, I would personally keep the smaller lathes. I've got a 13" Sheldon that is usually my go to lathe when putzing around the shop. It's setup with a static converter and I don't have to fire up the 20hp converter just to do a quick small job.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by norb View Post
    I have been following your adventures for some time now. I am going to offer you some advise. Buy yourself a calendar and take note of what year it is. STOP buying all that junk, and that is what it all is, junk! If you would have not wasted all that money buying and moving those useless antiques you could have bought something modern by now. I am not trying to be a jerk but I think it is time an adult stepped in and said something.
    Very wise advice. I have lots of machines now, but my limitation is space. I manage my lathe requirement with 3 lathes. I cannot do with less. I have 4 mills and cannot do with less than 3. I cannot afford to keep junk or any machine not fully tooled. Assess your requirements honestly and get rid of duplicity. I would get rid of both and buy a new 13/14" LeBlond. If that means saving your money until you can afford one, I'd do that.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    I think you have a harsh opinion. Not everything is suitable for cnc, certainly not where a 22" American is concerned. Are the cnc lathes out there that can do the job of the American, but at what cost? Most 20-22 year old's don't have the capital to build a new shop, go to college and buy new machinery all at the same time. I would venture to say that a man starting out with manual equipment will be a better machinist than starting out as a button pusher. No, rather than castigate our OP, you should be giving kudos for his accomplishments.

    Tom
    I have to agree with Tom. While the OP's situation is not the most common, he is in fact trying to get a business up and running without breaking the bank. All of those that say what he is buying is junk might be right if he was attempting to use them to make close tolerance aerospace parts. However they are still capable of making parts for a variety of industries that don't require tolerance's of .0001 or less.

    His scenario reminds me of a kid I worked with some 30 years ago. He had just finished his apprenticeship and wanted in the worst way to have his own machine shop. His dad embraced the idea and gave him a hand. He bought old and outdated equipment and managed to get a few contracts from local businesses. As time went on people realized his innovative ways and the fact that he could turn out quality products despite the age of his machinery. Over time he found he needed to upgrade and did so. Now 30+ years later he has one of the most successful shops in the area. He specializes in robotics and food processing and packaging equipment.

    I doubt he would be where he is today if everyone he asked for advice told him to stop buying junk, or that every machine in his shop was a toy.

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  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Why do you have a lathe? Is it to make parts, hold the shop floor down, or to own a collection? If its to ballast the shop floor or collect, keep both. If its actually to make parts, put them both up for sale. You can withdraw the second one from offer after you get paid from the first to sell. Or better yet, sell both.

    Sure, its nice to have extra equipment, but a little goes a long ways. Pretty soon you spend all your time polishing iron and no time making parts.

    To much equipment is chaos. Chaos is not conductive to productivity.
    What he said. Sell both. The Pacemaker will do yah.

    IF/AS/WHEN you have a genuine NEED for Metric AND a small lathe? South Korean Mori clones around 14", or even the better Taiwanese generics get you up out of the antiques and unobtanium class and into carbides-friendly RPM range.

    For a "revenue" shop, those just work.

    I'd not recommend MY choice - Cazeneuve HBX-360-BC. Parts are not so much unobtanium as simply unaffordium. Same sort of "show stopper" if I needed it to earn a crust.

    Time to focus more on each hunk of Old Iron's earning potential and less on its "legend".

  9. #28
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    "As you know, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time." Donald Rumsfeld

    Tom


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