Too much engine oil. What's the risk? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmcphearson View Post
    I've been told that an engine oil level that's too high can be catastrophic. I don't doubt it. But why? What exactly would happen? I even have a theory based on experience (which I will recount in a later post). But I'd like to hear from you guys first.

    Thanks
    -Roland
    Never overfill if you have a Toyota Prius. 1/2 quart too much and the engine stops running giving you lots of sensor errors. Lots of fun to fix.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by crrmeyer View Post
    Never overfill if you have a Toyota Prius. 1/2 quart too much and the engine stops running giving you lots of sensor errors. Lots of fun to fix.
    They also have the worlds most expensive catalytic converter (not actually but damn close...)

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    A one cylinder car...A few, Isetta comes to mind
    Heh. That used a BMW R27 motor. The motorbike could barely get out of its own way. In a car?
    Must have been an experience. Some of those were three wheel, some had two wide track wheels
    in front and two side-by-side wheels in the back. Supposedly had to do with taxation details of where
    they were sold.

  4. #44
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    Depends. And on how much extra.
    Some engines will splash and evacuate the extra.

    These days, crankcases tend to be sealed or closed.
    A modern closed auto crankcase would probably have a catastrophic learning experience of high $$$.
    Like a new engine.

    A:
    Like an eejit, I once filled our Nissan Qashqai+R with gas instead of diesel.
    I realised my error, and called a towtruck+mechanic.
    Before starting.

    Glad I did.
    The mechanic explained the procedure, that was quite involved.
    Our insurance covered it, but I still felt like an eejit.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Bulshit. Anytime a piston is going down another is going up.
    Not so fast. Each cylinder or pair of cylinders is in it's own "bay" in the crankcase. Contents of the crankcase must pump from one bay to the next as the pistons travel. If the crankcase is overfilled the pistons will be trying to pump oil from bay to bay instead of air.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    A one cylinder car...A few, Isetta comes to mind
    I know some geo metros had 3 cylinder engines and the chevy colorados had a 5 cylinder I believe.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    How does the oil get past the flywheel?
    The flywheel is what ensures that the oil is sprayed all around inside the bell housing instead of simply draining to the bottom.

  8. #48
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    Depends on how high.
    Race cars run dry sumps and/or oil scrapers on the crank to get every last bit of power.
    Get up to strokersix's bottom of a cylinder and you have a much bigger problem.

    Cross a too deep river on a two-stoke and you will lock the motor with water under the piston.
    The fix is to turn the bike upside down, remove the spark plug, and rotate the back wheel with it in gear to pump the water out.
    Sometimes there is serious damage done by the lock up. Sometimes you get lucky. (hasn't everyone done this a few times?)

    Foaming or stirring the oil is not a problem, the counterweights are always doing this to the sump or return oil.
    A quart high in a big block Chevy is not the same as a quart high in your lawnmower.
    Bob

  9. #49
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    2 strokes will pull water into the engine through the exhuast too... fun times pumping them out. There is a great video of Johnny Walker doing it in the middle of Erzberg.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizingkid View Post
    2 strokes will pull water into the engine through the exhuast too... fun times pumping them out. There is a great video of Johnny Walker doing it in the middle of Erzberg.
    So will 4 strokes if you run too little lobe separation or too much lift on a wet exhaust boat engine.


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