tubing "bead" tool
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  1. #1
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    Default tubing "bead" tool

    not sure of the nomenclature as this is not exactly a bead. 3/8" steel tubing. "bead" is 5" from end of tubing. what tool is used for this? and is there a way to do this economically in relatively small numbers? (25-50)
    it is a stop so the tubing is inserted to a calibrated position (dipstick tube)

    tubing-bead.jpg

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    Have a looky in here:
    Mastercool Inc., Manufacturer of Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, Service Tools and Equipment

    and maybe you can just make your own dies, adapt to a small hydraulic press.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Have a looky in here:
    Mastercool Inc., Manufacturer of Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, Service Tools and Equipment

    and maybe you can just make your own dies, adapt to a small hydraulic press.
    thanks, however i already own that tool and it does a different style "bead" at the end of the tubing only - won't work further in. this looks like the tubing is pulled together to form a "ridge" for lack of a better term

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    If you had 2 of those tools you might be able to do it. clamp both to tubes with the required gap and one end of both tools in a vise and the other gets a big c clamp, tighten both to crimp.
    Or in a press with a larger pipe over your tube to push the top tool if not to far from ends.

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    Or slip on a ring of steel wire and solder it into place.

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    They likely hydroform them, this might help though.

    bead forming tubing

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    Quote Originally Posted by cg285 View Post
    thanks, however i already own that tool and it does a different style "bead" at the end of the tubing only - won't work further in. this looks like the tubing is pulled together to form a "ridge" for lack of a better term
    Gee...why didn't you post this little pearl of info in your OP ?....

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    There used to be a tool used in plumbing. It put a bead in 3/8 od copper supply lines for lavs and toilets. The rod was drilled and a cam end inserted. When you twisted the L shaped handle the cam pushed a steel ball outward making the ridge. I still have it somewhere (I think). That held a brass washer in place under a rubber washer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Gee...why didn't you post this little pearl of info in your OP ?....
    i have no idea what you would come up with. i have other tools that don't work either

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Or slip on a ring of steel wire and solder it into place.
    not the way this was made but that just might work, thanks

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    If you have the capability to "roll your own" tooling you could really easily make something like this with slight changes to put the bead wherever you like:

    YouTube

    Probably would need something like Ray's description for the inside of the tube.

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    You maybe could make or modify something like the Earls beading tool to make it work at that depth.


    edit- tried to add a link, but it didn't work- just google Earls beading tool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keyepitts View Post
    You maybe could make or modify something like the Earls beading tool to make it work at that depth.


    edit- tried to add a link, but it didn't work- just google Earls beading tool.
    hmm, says only with alum tubing

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    Quote Originally Posted by cg285 View Post
    not the way this was made but that just might work, thanks
    You could cut rings of the next size tube or buy brass compression rings. By the time you calibrate the ring forming machine you would be time and money ahead for only making 25. Fire sprinkler plumbing does similar but they roll a groove into the steel pipe from the outside. So it is the reverse of what you want. Hydroforming comes to mind as well. Some car headers are hydroformed from tube.
    Bill D

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    Circular heating via induction coil followed by compression from the ends.
    If you just have a few to make you can do it in an old lathe. Spin it while heating with a torch and then compress with the tailstock.

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    Perhaps a bulging tool. Ie a urethane plug that expands while two external bores restrain the rest of the tube.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    Circular heating via induction coil followed by compression from the ends.
    If you just have a few to make you can do it in an old lathe. Spin it while heating with a torch and then compress with the tailstock.
    i'll give that a shot and see how it works. if not then solder...

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    lathe trick worked. not as prominent as the sample but doable. a little time consuming.
    i guess the way the original was made is a well guarded secret - like rubber molding

    beaded-tube.jpg

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    Is there a bead on the inside of the tube as well? If so it might be a hint that it was 2 pieces of tubing friction welded together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cg285 View Post
    lathe trick worked. not as prominent as the sample but doable. a little time consuming.
    Thanks for the followup. Interesting that the lathe trick worked, and it looks pretty good.

    When I look at both photos of the original bead, I can't help but think I see a seam and wonder if it is two pieces, pressed and soldered, or friction welded.


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