Unknown milling machine
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    71
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default Unknown milling machine

    Hi all came across this milling machine that is for sale, would anyone know if it is a chinese or taiwanese make

    Cheers,
    Mark.

    milling-machine_18698263.h.jpg

    milling-machine_18698265.h.jpg

    milling-machine_18698266.h.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine Builder View Post
    Hi all came across this milling machine that is for sale, would anyone know if it is a chinese or taiwanese make

    Cheers,
    Mark.

    milling-machine_18698263.h.jpg

    milling-machine_18698265.h.jpg

    milling-machine_18698266.h.jpg
    I would hazard a guess that it is one of those we sometimes call "generic Taiwanese", yes. "Mainland" China uses a character set with a lot of simplified radicals. The data plate seems to be in the "traditional" Chinese characters still used in Taiwan, Hong Kong, etc.

    Note the "50 Hz" - no sweat.

    Also "380 Volt" - above my pay grade to know if that wants a transformer or VFD or both when operated in Australia.

  3. Likes Turbine Builder liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    71
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    OK thanks for that, i was thinking it was a chinese make. I will go and have a look at he asking $2,500 AUD for it. Also found this Rambaudi Mill which i will have a look at as well, he wans $2,750 AUD for it. My budget is $3,000 AUD don't know if i will get a decent milling machine for $3,000 especially here in Australia

    vertical-milling-machine_19230301.h.jpg

    vertical-milling-machine_19230302.h.jpg

    vertical-milling-machine_19230303.h.jpg

    vertical-milling-machine_19230304.h.jpg

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    1,585
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1916
    Likes (Received)
    618

    Default

    Hi Mark,

    Hands down, the Rambaudi mill is the better mill of the two, if it all works and hasn't been abused. It would have built in power feeds and rapids on all axis, a much bigger table, and likely a wider range of speeds in the head. It doesn't have the "nodding" feature that the bridgeport styles do, but to most guys, that is a plus. Much more rigid. The Rambaudi mill would be taller and much heavier that the BP style mill.

    I own a Rambaudi MS2 mill, which also has the horizontal spindle. Other than that, they look identical. I looked at quite a few Bridgeports before I found the Rambaudi mill. At first, I was intimidated by it's size, but once I bought it, I just love it.

    Brian

  6. Likes Mr WALTER, Limy Sami, Monarchist liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    Hi Mark,

    Hands down, the Rambaudi mill is the better mill of the two, if it all works and hasn't been abused. It would have built in power feeds and rapids on all axis, a much bigger table, and likely a wider range of speeds in the head. It doesn't have the "nodding" feature that the bridgeport styles do, but to most guys, that is a plus. Much more rigid. The Rambaudi mill would be taller and much heavier that the BP style mill.

    I own a Rambaudi MS2 mill, which also has the horizontal spindle. Other than that, they look identical. I looked at quite a few Bridgeports before I found the Rambaudi mill. At first, I was intimidated by it's size, but once I bought it, I just love it.

    Brian
    Thank you for this post. I was not deep knowledge about this but I got a basic knowledge from you.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Connecticut
    Posts
    770
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    236

    Default

    Hard to tell from the pics, but is that dirt and leaves all over the Rambaudi base and floor. If so bring lots of rags and way oil before you even move any of the axis


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  9. Likes Ray Behner, Turbine Builder liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    18,598
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14138
    Likes (Received)
    14105

    Default

    Another vote for the Rambaudi, AS LONG AS it's not worn or damaged etc etc, AFAIK parts are unobtanium.

    If you're not sure of what you're looking at, take someone with you who does.

    Oh yeah, compared to the Asian mill the Rambaudi is likely to be very heavy - anything up to 2000kg

    FYI Rambaudi Millers

  11. Likes Monarchist, Turbine Builder liked this post
  12. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine Builder View Post
    OK thanks for that, i was thinking it was a chinese make. I will go and have a look at he asking $2,500 AUD for it. Also found this Rambaudi Mill which i will have a look at as well, he wans $2,750 AUD for it. My budget is $3,000 AUD don't know if i will get a decent milling machine for $3,000 especially here in Australia

    vertical-milling-machine_19230301.h.jpg

    vertical-milling-machine_19230302.h.jpg

    vertical-milling-machine_19230303.h.jpg

    vertical-milling-machine_19230304.h.jpg
    Grab the Rambaudi - QUICKLY!

    Then run fast and hide - before someone realizes you have gotten away with a genuine treasure!


  13. Likes Turbine Builder liked this post
  14. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    71
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    Hi Brian,
    Yes i really like the Rambaudi mill i did miss out on one last year, lets see how i go with this one. I did some research on them one thing to look out for is the half nut that can be worn out and very hard to find one.

    Cheers,
    Mark.

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    71
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    Yeah leaves and dirt around the base and floor. He lives off the main road and i got to drive on a dirt road for a couple of kilometers, you could say semi bush area. But as you can see there is not much rust on the mill.

  16. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    71
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    Yeah i got idea what to look for, like checking the half nut and see how much ply on the feeds. Also will run threw all the speeds.

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cottage Grove, MN 55016
    Posts
    7,590
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4093
    Likes (Received)
    4537

    Default

    Looks like a "Wong Hong Low" Knee Mill to me
    Last edited by Richard King; 01-30-2018 at 05:25 AM.

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Angier, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,574
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1048
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    Half-nut on a mill - ?? That's a new one on me. What does the half-nut do?

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    1,585
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1916
    Likes (Received)
    618

    Default

    On a Rambaudi mill, the bottom of the table has a half nut fastened to the underside of the table and running the length of it.

    Here's a quick pic...

    img_0923-768x1024-.jpg

    Brian

  20. Likes Monarchist, awake liked this post
  21. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by awake View Post
    Half-nut on a mill - ?? That's a new one on me. What does the half-nut do?
    Traverses the table, long-axis. Vertical space-saving? Clears debris? Has greater total bearing area to spread wear? All of the above?

    Ever been to Italy? Dated an Italian gal? Tried to get any two Italians to agree, even within a family?

    Hard to call that "thinking out of the box" for folk who never entered a "box" to begin with!


  22. Likes Sachmanram, rcoope liked this post
  23. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    1,585
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1916
    Likes (Received)
    618

    Default

    Here's a link that might explain it better...

    Rambaudi M3 Milling Machines

    Brian

  24. Likes awake liked this post
  25. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Angier, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,574
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1048
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    On a Rambaudi mill, the bottom of the table has a half nut fastened to the underside of the table and running the length of it.

    Here's a quick pic...

    img_0923-768x1024-.jpg

    Brian
    Huh - had no idea. So the lead screw stays stationary rather than moving with the table?

    Sent from my Lenovo TB-8504F using Tapatalk

  26. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Angier, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,574
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1048
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    Here's a link that might explain it better...

    Rambaudi M3 Milling Machines

    Brian
    Yes, very helpful indeed. An interesting design - much more expensive to manufacture, no doubt, but I can see how convenient the front-mounted hand wheel would be compared to the end-mounted wheels I'm used to.

    Sent from my Lenovo TB-8504F using Tapatalk

  27. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by awake View Post
    I can see how convenient the front-mounted hand wheel would be compared to the end-mounted wheels I'm used to.
    So obvious, once seen, surface-grinder style, even, that one actually wonders why more builders didn't do the same. The "half nut" is not the only way to implement the more ergonometric handwheel. Not by a long-shot.

    Downsides? Wide/deep work that overhangs the table and shrouds it. But the same thing has been an issue on overly LONG work even on "conventional" handwheel or balanced-lever placement.

  28. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    71
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    Hi Guys,
    Just got back from inspecting the Rambaudi Mill, there is 19 thou play on the X and Y axis and the knee about the same. The owner did not know how to operate most of the controls, went threw all the spindle speeds he said the highest speed there is a c clip on top that pops off the spindle shaft after about 30 mins run. All power feeds work no bad nose. Some pics to look at the half nut looks good. So I'm going to go for it, i got the price down to $2,200 AUD.
    Cheers,
    Mark.

    resize-img_6363.jpg

    resize-resize-img_6363.jpg

    resize-img_6369.jpg

    resize-img_6366.jpgresize-img_6365.jpg


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •