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    Default UNS threads

    Hi. Can anyone point me to a spec for the marine style UNS threads 1" 14TPI and 1-1/4" 11TPI please? Can existing 60 degree tooling make these - if so which (UNC etc.)? I'd ideally like to mill the threads. Thank you.

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    You don't own a Machinery's Handbook?

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    Unless your customer's prints say otherwise, I would use tooling for the UN thread profile sized for 11TPI or 14TPI. The only thing special is that the size/pitch combination isn't standard. Thread form will be standard. Don't use UNJ thread profile unless the prints call for it.

    Short version: yes, standard 60 degree tooling works.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinoyance View Post
    You don't own a Machinery's Handbook?
    Oddly enough many many Brits don't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Oddly enough many many Brits don't.
    Serious question. Why?

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazygoat View Post
    Serious question. Why?
    Over here it's always been a very expensive book, …..<> 15 (maybe more) years ago my issue 27 was on special offer and still cost over £60 (say $80+) and since we went metric in the early 70's, shall we say MHB took a good while to catch up.

    Prior to my buying #27, the only MHB I had dated from the late 30's early 40's,(it's not to hand) ………...and IIRC, I gave a retiring guy £3 or £4 for it in 1972 - ish, and considered I'd got a bargain! (that's £40 - £50 at todays money )

    FYI Todays price in the UK on Amazon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Machinerys-...G8J0EJJR57C54M

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Over here it's always been a very expensive book, …..<> 15 (maybe more) years ago my issue 27 was on special offer and still cost over £60 (say $80+) and since we went metric in the early 70's, shall we say MHB took a good while to catch up.

    Prior to my buying #27, the only MHB I had dated from the late 30's early 40's,(it's not to hand) ………...and IIRC, I gave a retiring guy £3 or £4 for it in 1972 - ish, and considered I'd got a bargain! (that's £40 - £50 at todays money )

    FYI Todays price in the UK on Amazon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Machinerys-...G8J0EJJR57C54M
    I just checked my version and it's 19! I got it with a buy out of a guy that was quitting in the mid to late 70's. Latest edition is 30 and it is around $105. They are expensive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    Unless your customer's prints say otherwise, I would use tooling for the UN thread profile sized for 11TPI or 14TPI. The only thing special is that the size/pitch combination isn't standard. Thread form will be standard. Don't use UNJ thread profile unless the prints call for it.

    Short version: yes, standard 60 degree tooling works.
    Thank you for your reply. I did wonder if that would be the case but had no means to check. None of the references over here list it. Plenty about the plain vanilla UN but UNS is never mentioned and as it says it is special......maybe it was really 'special' ;-)

    Despite a lot of searching on the internet nothing that appeared trustworthy came up. That's the thing about the good old interweb...you can search until you're blue in the face and yet oddly miss the very something that another person finds in a moment.

    Maybe now having heard of 'the book' I'll have a non-Amazon moment through my local book store.

    thanks guys

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    Quote Originally Posted by ftaylor View Post
    Hi. Can anyone point me to a spec for the marine style UNS threads 1" 14TPI and 1-1/4" 11TPI please? Can existing 60 degree tooling make these - if so which (UNC etc.)? I'd ideally like to mill the threads. Thank you.
    Buy ASME B1.1 (Unified Inch Screw Threads) or even better

    ThreadPal - dimensions and tolerances for inch and metric screw threads

    and you will be more than covered.

    uns14.jpg uns11.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazygoat View Post
    I just checked my version and it's 19! I got it with a buy out of a guy that was quitting in the mid to late 70's. Latest edition is 30 and it is around $105. They are expensive.
    I'll see your 19th Edition, and raise you my 9th (1937)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    I'll see your 19th Edition, and raise you my 9th (1937)
    Makes a person feel kinda ancient, doesn't it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazygoat View Post
    I just checked my version and it's 19! I got it with a buy out of a guy that was quitting in the mid to late 70's. Latest edition is 30 and it is around $105. They are expensive.
    Is $105 expensive? Compared to what?

    Books like Machinist Handbooks are good - for the purpose they are written. They aren't standards and their purpose is to try to give information on as much as possible within the machining industry.

    Anyone wanting to know as much as possible about a specific area or subject within machining isn't going to find it in a handbook. There will though probably be enough to get you pointed in the right direction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Is $105 expensive? Compared to what?
    It's a lot of money if A, you haven't got it to spare, and B, ''need'' it to earn a living.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazygoat View Post
    Serious question. Why?
    Well;

    It's as antiquated as can possibly be. 90% of it's contents are completely useless unless you're working with 100 year old equipment and building things to 100 year old standards and specifications.

    It's practically useless if you work mainly to metric standards.

    The parts of it that are actually useful (like op's query) are readily available elsewhere.

    And like Sami said, it's bloody expensive.

    Complete waste of money IMHO. My copy has not left the shelf for literally years.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Is $105 expensive? Compared to what?
    Compared to for example the Engineers Black Book, which contains all the actually useful information contained in MH, including a lot of useful modern information that is not in MH, and was about £25 last time I bought one. I get a copy for everyone who comes to work here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    It's a lot of money if A, you haven't got it to spare, and B, ''need'' it to earn a living.
    I'd hate to be in the situation where $105 makes a difference as to how I live or earn a living

    Have things become that bad in the UK for machinists and machine shops? Things must go great for gregormarwick as he gives machinist handbooks away free.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    I'd hate to be in the situation where $105 makes a difference as to how I live or earn a living .
    Unfortunately, these days in the UK, there are a lot of people, (including highly skilled machinists etc etc) to whom an unexpected / unplanned for $105 (£80) '' bill'' would make a GREAT deal of difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Unfortunately, these days in the UK, there are a lot of people, (including highly skilled machinists etc etc) to whom an unexpected / unplanned for $105 (£80) '' bill'' would make a GREAT deal of difference.
    You are feeding him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    Well;

    It's as antiquated as can possibly be. 90% of it's contents are completely useless unless you're working with 100 year old equipment and building things to 100 year old standards and specifications.

    It's practically useless if you work mainly to metric standards.

    The parts of it that are actually useful (like op's query) are readily available elsewhere.

    And like Sami said, it's bloody expensive.

    Complete waste of money IMHO. My copy has not left the shelf for literally years.



    Compared to for example the Engineers Black Book, which contains all the actually useful information contained in MH, including a lot of useful modern information that is not in MH, and was about £25 last time I bought one. I get a copy for everyone who comes to work here.
    You are truly full of shit! The MHB is one of the best machining references in existence. You are correct, it is also historical, but that is not a bad thing. It is updated regularly to include modern day subjects, processes and techniques as well as historical data. It is worth every penny of its cost. Further, it also comes in both paper and .PDF. The .PDF version is indexed, which is a great help in locating stuff. I use both. Please also keep in mind that it includes all the antiquated and current British standards as well. If you were truly "up to speed", you would realize that much of the Chinese products that have displaced American, European and British stuff and virtually all threaded items appear to use the British standards. The MHB is global reference. Spend some time and discover its contents. You won't regret it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Is $105 expensive? Compared to what?


    To a young machinist just starting out that is a lot of money. They would have think hard about buying something not used every day. As I gained experience I found it more useful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazygoat View Post
    To a young machinist just starting out that is a lot of money. They would have think hard about buying something not used every day. As I gained experience I found it more useful.
    but the same guy would think nothing of blowing $800 for a new phone. LOL


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