UNS threads - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 36 of 36

Thread: UNS threads

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Aberdeen, UK
    Posts
    3,509
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1217
    Likes (Received)
    1318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    You are truly full of shit! The MHB is one of the best machining references in existence. You are correct, it is also historical, but that is not a bad thing. It is updated regularly to include modern day subjects, processes and techniques as well as historical data. It is worth every penny of its cost. Further, it also comes in both paper and .PDF. The .PDF version is indexed, which is a great help in locating stuff. I use both. Please also keep in mind that it includes all the antiquated and current British standards as well. If you were truly "up to speed", you would realize that much of the Chinese products that have displaced American, European and British stuff and virtually all threaded items appear to use the British standards. The MHB is global reference. Spend some time and discover its contents. You won't regret it.
    My comments came from a position of familiarity with the subject, and I stand by them.

    I had the MHB shoved in my face when I embarked on this career and I did use it for many years as the defacto reference. The pdf version too. I don't need to spend any more time with it and am already aware of it's contents.

  2. Likes Gordon B. Clarke, Oldwrench liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hatch, NM Chile capital of the WORLD
    Posts
    9,018
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13662
    Likes (Received)
    10663

    Default

    Count me in as another that thinks the Machinery Handbook is essentially useless and outdated...

    The last one I bought was 27 I think, Mid 2000's or so... And it still only had one tiny
    little blurb about CAT tapers.. Yet there are 40 pages of detailed diagrams
    detailing B&S tapers.. IN THE 2000's!!!!!!

    Unless something drastic has changed, all they do is move around a few charts and paragraphs,
    and then slap a different color cover on the thing...

    Pretty much any handbook after the 40's is going to be just as relevant as a newer one,
    Head on down to the used book store, the one here (Its MASSIVE) usually has quite a few
    on the shelf for $10-$15. E-bay usually has them cheap also.. I've never checked amazon.

    Whatever you do, make sure you get one with the thumb tabs.. Absolute pain in the ass if
    your book doesn't have the thumb tabs...

    Its something that you should have in your arsenal, but I certainly would never buy a new
    one again.

  4. Likes Oldwrench, gregormarwick, Limy Sami liked this post
  5. #23
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,157
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4007
    Likes (Received)
    12668

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Unfortunately, these days in the UK, there are a lot of people, (including highly skilled machinists etc etc) to whom an unexpected / unplanned for $105 (£80) '' bill'' would make a GREAT deal of difference.
    I can't imagine the "unexpected / unplanned" need cropping up suddenly. If it did then surely the machinist would expect the company to have one or buy one?

    Something to put on the list for Santa? Larry Dickman has it right. What some people can afford or are willing to spend money on, never ceases to surprise me. I can't remember the last time I saw a kid here (preteen) that didn't have a mobile phone. That they're also faster than me at using it is bloody embarrassing

  6. #24
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,157
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4007
    Likes (Received)
    12668

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    My comments came from a position of familiarity with the subject, and I stand by them.

    I had the MHB shoved in my face when I embarked on this career and I did use it for many years as the defacto reference. The pdf version too. I don't need to spend any more time with it and am already aware of it's contents.
    Same here. I had one years ago and lost it. Never found the need for a new one. OK I do have what most would regard as a library mainly on screw threads and the internet also helps now and then.

    There's also PM and many seem to find it easier to ask than doing anything themselves first.

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    473
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    362
    Likes (Received)
    391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    but the same guy would think nothing of blowing $800 for a new phone. LOL
    Sad, but so true. I know people that haven't got a pot to piss in but they do have an Iphone.

  8. #26
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,157
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4007
    Likes (Received)
    12668

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobw View Post
    Count me in as another that thinks the Machinery Handbook is essentially useless and outdated...

    Its something that you should have in your arsenal, but I certainly would never buy a new
    one again.
    There's also the question of which country the MH is intended for. I can't imagine most countries and machinists are interested in one that isn't metric.

    Nope I haven't written metric is better, but it is more widespread. The USA and the UK still can't even agree on how much a gallon or a pound is.
    Last edited by Gordon B. Clarke; 09-13-2019 at 03:27 PM. Reason: have to haven't

  9. Likes Bobw liked this post
  10. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    79

    Default Lantern-post dimensions sought

    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    I'll see your 19th Edition, and raise you my 9th (1937)
    Limy, does that 1937 issue contain anything on the dimensions of lantern-style tool posts? I'm interested in the radii of the various dished washers and rockers that rest on those washers.

    I usually use an Aloris BXA toolpost, but sometimes the lantern with rocker is just the thing. The rocker system benefits from accurate machining - rigidity greatly increases.

  11. #28
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wyoming
    Posts
    3,216
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7739
    Likes (Received)
    5175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobw View Post
    Count me in as another that thinks the Machinery Handbook is essentially useless and outdated...
    And it still only had one tiny little blurb about CAT tapers. Yet there are 40 pages of detailed diagrams detailing B&S tapers..
    You nailed it. I haven't opened the handbook drawer in my box for a very long time. If I need something like the dimensions of a 5C collet, or AN/JIC O-ring bosses I have Google. Back in the day the Handbook had the frame dimensions of electric motors, how to calculate interest, and other cool arcana like how to lace belts and color metals. It also had the Angle of Repose for Shit. Don't laugh—the angle of repose is the natural angle from center of a conical pile of material like sand, so you could easily calculate the area needed for said pile. Manure being a commonly piled material, its angle of repose was listed...so with an early enough edition you could win bets in the shop.

    But I agree that as a ready reference its day has passed.

  12. Likes Bobw, Limy Sami liked this post
  13. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    18,620
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14160
    Likes (Received)
    14162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    I can't imagine the "unexpected / unplanned" need cropping up suddenly. If it did then surely the machinist would expect the company to have one or buy one?
    Sorry I'm not playing any more

  14. Likes converterking, camscan, NAST555 liked this post
  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    18,620
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14160
    Likes (Received)
    14162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post


    Limy, does that 1937 issue contain anything on the dimensions of lantern-style tool posts? I'm interested in the radii of the various dished washers and rockers that rest on those washers.

    I usually use an Aloris BXA toolpost, but sometimes the lantern with rocker is just the thing. The rocker system benefits from accurate machining - rigidity greatly increases.
    I'll have a butchas Joe, and get back to you

    Joe, I had a good look in my MHB#9, elderly Newnes & Kemps Engineers Handbooks (sorta Brit MHB's) but with no luck, ………….nor can I remember seeing those specs anywhere.
    Last edited by Limy Sami; 09-13-2019 at 01:52 PM. Reason: Getting back to Joe

  16. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    79

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    I'll have a butchas Joe, and get back to you

    Joe, I had a good look in my MHB#9, elderly Newnes & Kemps Engineers Handbooks (sorta Brit MHB's) but with no luck, ………….nor can I remember seeing those specs anywhere.
    Thanks. I have been having that problem to. I have found some partial European standards, and I have to believe that there are US ones as well. But don't have a document name or number.

    Hmm. Maybe Armstrong Tool has something on their web site. Although their lantern toolposts are forged - very rugged, but not precise. I greatly improved an Armstrong dished washer by facing its flat side off. Before, most of the tightening torque went into flatting the washer against the top of the compound, and clamping rigidity increased gradually as one tightened the clamp bolt. Now, it clamps far more abruptly, and is far more rigid.


  17. #32
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,157
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4007
    Likes (Received)
    12668

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Sorry I'm not playing any more
    I didn't know you were. I wasn't.

  18. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    6,276
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9377
    Likes (Received)
    2939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post


    Thanks. I have been having that problem to. I have found some partial European standards, and I have to believe that there are US ones as well. But don't have a document name or number.

    Hmm. Maybe Armstrong Tool has something on their web site. Although their lantern toolposts are forged - very rugged, but not precise. I greatly improved an Armstrong dished washer by facing its flat side off. Before, most of the tightening torque went into flatting the washer against the top of the compound, and clamping rigidity increased gradually as one tightened the clamp bolt. Now, it clamps far more abruptly, and is far more rigid.

    My apprenticeship instructor was a stickler for terminology and I thank him for it. If he gave us a test with 100 questions and one was the proper name for that piece of shit, and someone said "lantern", they failed. 99 correct and that dumb answer, you failed. Set you back 30 days. I have certainly never seen a lantern that looked like that. It's a "ring and rocker". The only requirement was that the radii of the ring and rocker roughly matched so that any adjustment wiped out the angles on your HSS tool. A masterpiece of anacronism.
    M

  19. Likes Oldwrench liked this post
  20. #34
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Country
    SOUTH AFRICA
    Posts
    1,613
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1188
    Likes (Received)
    666

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crazygoat View Post
    Serious question. Why?
    Nor do we here. I'ts a Zeus book that we use and it ends at UNF. Doesn't even have BSPT in it, We don't really need much else, the rest I get from an old German book on threads.

  21. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    79

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    My apprenticeship instructor was a stickler for terminology and I thank him for it. If he gave us a test with 100 questions and one was the proper name for that piece of shit, and someone said "lantern", they failed. 99 correct and that dumb answer, you failed. Set you back 30 days. I have certainly never seen a lantern that looked like that. It's a "ring and rocker". The only requirement was that the radii of the ring and rocker roughly matched so that any adjustment wiped out the angles on your HSS tool. A masterpiece of anachronism.
    M
    Yeah. But they were called lantern toolposts back in the day, because they resembled a kind of kerosene lantern widely used in the day, on horse-drawn carriages I think. This is before the rocker approach was invented - they used stacks of shims back then. And people continued to use shims, even with a rocker, because the rocker allowed for quick fine adjustment in cutting tool height to the spindle axis height.

    Armstrong Tool has been absorbed into the Snap-On group, and Williams no longer makes rocker toolposts. But plenty of people still do.
    Last edited by Joe Gwinn; 09-15-2019 at 08:42 AM. Reason: typo and expansion

  22. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    473
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    362
    Likes (Received)
    391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    That they're also faster than me at using it is bloody embarrassing
    That's why I have a dumb flip phone. It gives me a good excuse!


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •