UP6 Ingersoll Rand Compressor Motor Swap
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  1. #1
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    Default UP6 Ingersoll Rand Compressor Motor Swap

    Hi Everyone,
    Great forum,
    I searched and did not find a similar situation.

    I have a Ingersoll Rand UP6 7.5HP TAS Rotary Compressor 230/1/60

    The motor seized and I am seeing it may be cheaper to replace with a WEG similar spec'ed motor.

    My thought is if I can get away with not doing a original motor swap with the fan on motor shaft (opposite of belt side) , and instead purchase a regular motor and just install an electric fan on the cooler top plate. has anyone done a similar swap?

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    Positive the motor seized and not the compressor.

    I replaced a burned motor on a 10hp reciprocating compressor and it nearly blew another motor because the compressor head had issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strostkovy View Post
    Positive the motor seized and not the compressor.

    I replaced a burned motor on a 10hp reciprocating compressor and it nearly blew another motor because the compressor head had issues.
    Yup, did the motor bearings seize ? might be cheaper to simply replace those, even if the shaft needs welded & machined.

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    Motors almost never seize.

    As for your question, you are really asking 'can I replace a TEFC motor with a motor spec'd for less rigorous duty?'

    You don't mention what type of non-fan cooled motor you want to use but I assume it's a rolled steel type or perhaps an open air type. If the HP (and torque) rating is the same, it will work but will not be as impervious to contaminants, and it probably won't be as durable.

    You'd need to provide more detail on the alternate motor for anyone to tell you more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Yup, did the motor bearings seize ? might be cheaper to simply replace those, even if the shaft needs welded & machined.
    Thank you for responses everyone, here is some more info,

    The compressor was put out of service about 2.5-3yrs ago and stored indoors until Recently getting it ready doing coolant oil, filters, and then belt is when I noticed the Airend spun freely but the electric motor was stuck. Unit has 8200 hours total.

    When I dismounted the motor I noticed the motor is TEFC, the replacement is the same specs being a TEFC, the original has a extended shaft out the back end of motor with another blower/fan attached to the end to pull air in from the filter and up out the cooler on top.

    is this inefficiently pulling air through the filter and pushing air out the top cooler?
    Looks like may be better served if I did a blower/fan pull through at top cooler especially now that may need to replace the motor.

    I will check the bearings and see if simple fix, the motor will rotate just a 1/4" then stop.

    considering options and if replacement is needed I can add a fan on top to pull through dryer and cooler.

    thank you all again for the information.


    The replacement without the special shaft on rear is WEG 7.5 HP 2P 184TZ 1Ph 230 V 60 Hz IC411 - TEFC - Foot-mounted


    img_4475.jpgingersoll-motor.jpg

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    I'm not sure what I'm looking at but from what I can see, the extra fax is used to ventilate the enclosure. It's important to note (if I am seeing it correctly) that you do not have a cooler, just an enclosure. The enclosure does not do any cooling, it just acts as a 'house' to afford some degree of weather protection. If you run the new motor without the enclosure ventilation fan, I would guess you'll eventually have the new motor running in a high ambient. In other words, the heat will build up inside the enclosure rather than getting sent outside. The good news is it looks like the new motor has a double extended shaft so you could possibly add a fan to provide ventilation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I'm not sure what I'm looking at but from what I can see, the extra fax is used to ventilate the enclosure. It's important to note (if I am seeing it correctly) that you do not have a cooler, just an enclosure. The enclosure does not do any cooling, it just acts as a 'house' to afford some degree of weather protection. If you run the new motor without the enclosure ventilation fan, I would guess you'll eventually have the new motor running in a high ambient. In other words, the heat will build up inside the enclosure rather than getting sent outside. The good news is it looks like the new motor has a double extended shaft so you could possibly add a fan to provide ventilation.

    Hi Gregsy,

    The unit has the Ingersoll "TAS" system. Air would would be pulled on the right side enclosure from pic, it passes through The "TAS" heat exchanger dryer, then into the motor enclosure by way of the motor shaft driven blower fan in the middle of unit, air is then pushed up through the aftercooler on top. all this is being circulated from the center point off motor fan. Pulling and pushing air up.

    Im thinking if eliminated the shaft driven center point fan/blower and put a puller fan on top of after cooler to pull air up through it would make for a better air flow?

    this is steaming from a new motor needed and not having to go with the WEG original shaft fan and get a similar WEG with Similar specs with out the special shaft fan.






    a side note: The unit only has the motor shaft fan in center of unit. there is no other fans currently. Attempting to replace the special unique to this model motor shaft fan and replace with a similar without the extended shaft fan then add a fan on top. the NEW motor will still be TEFC

    appreciate your thoughts and recommendations

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    Compressor duty motors are designed for multiple starts. Regular motors will burn up if started more then 10-12 times per hour. This motor may run all the time so not an issue they just cycle the compressor valve load instead. Similar to a gas engine compressor.
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Compressor duty motors are designed for multiple starts. Regular motors will burn up if started more then 10-12 times per hour. This motor may run all the time so not an issue they just cycle the compressor valve load instead. Similar to a gas engine compressor.
    Bill D

    appreciate the comment, for my situation both motors are the exact same. only difference is the shaft is special on the original having a pully side, with the other end extending the shaft.

    the ingersoll Rand motor is built by WEG part number 22399182 and WEG Motors has the same motor without the Ingersoll extended rear shaft for the blower #10016381

    my thought is to save a few bucks and not get the OEM but I will have to add a fan on the top cooler. after cooler.

    appreciate your time

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    The starts per hour subject is a bit of a tricky one because it depends a lot on the specific motor and the inertia of the load. Proper blowoff makes a compressor a fairly easy load to start. The quick little pshhhh of a reciprocating compressor combined with the tendency to be single phase and built to a low cost with undersized, undercooled motors and a common lack of maintenance of the compressor head lubricant gives compressors a reputation for being motor killers despite how easy it is to prevent.

    Having no information on this particular compressor I would personally use a farm duty motor which are also meant for frequent starts and stops.


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