US made engine lathes that cut metric threads?
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 60
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    11,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    8984

    Default US made engine lathes that cut metric threads?

    I need a better engine lathe in the 16x40 inch range. I'd like to have something US made, like a Monarch, American, Lodge and Shipley, etc. However, I need to be able to cut metric threads.

    I understand that any lathe can cut any threads with the right change gears. But, did any US lathes cut metric threads without the need to change gears? I've done a bit of searching, and it seems like maybe some of the later South Bend lathes can cut metric.

    Are there any models I should look out for? My current Taiwan special can cut US threads from 1.5 TPI up to I think 100, plus metric and DP threads, and it can cut 13 TPI, all with no unbolting of gears.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    13,619
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2280
    Likes (Received)
    3535

    Default

    Not USA, but how about British? Colchesters will cut metric and DP.

    I'm not sure enough to bet money on it, but when I was buying my Polamco new in 1980, it was unanimous opinion among the dealers that there were no USA made lathes that cut metric threads, which was one of my buying criteria. Canadian Standard Modern might also.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    11,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    8984

    Default

    I guess the US makers were pretty well out of the game by the time cutting metric threads was really a concern for US buyers.

    Did the US machine builders ever make metric versions for export like every company makes inch versions for us to import?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    30,083
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Did the US machine builders ever make metric versions for export like every company makes inch versions for us to import?
    Hendey for certain, Pratt & Whitney for certain like way back. P&W filled German armories with USA made machines prior to 1900

    Thumbnail is Hendey from about 1920
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 031.jpg  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    6,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    748
    Likes (Received)
    2356

    Default

    I don't get the reluctance to change gears.

    My Mazak Ace changes in less than 5 minutes, and the Weiler LZ330 the same. A spanner is the only tool needed, and I keep those on the headstock.

    Call me lazy, I can't see the reason to need a lever to do the same change over.

  6. Likes steve-l, Monarchist liked this post
  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    11,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    8984

    Default

    Once you change the gear, then what? Those machines probably have a nice chart and factory made gears.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    13,229
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6615
    Likes (Received)
    2561

    Default

    My 1918 L&S has a metric change gear chart. Have never used it, but it looks like you swap the spindle gear.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    6,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    748
    Likes (Received)
    2356

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    Once you change the gear, then what? Those machines probably have a nice chart and factory made gears.

    Change the gearing, do the task, then put the "familiar" gears back. It's easy.

    And yes, A good reference is a must. I tend to use the printed data in the service and operation handbooks. The placards are hard to read on both machines.
    It's a lot like making an op sheet for any part production. Setting up the machine is just one of the operations.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    294
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    I don't get the reluctance to change gears.

    My Mazak Ace changes in less than 5 minutes, and the Weiler LZ330 the same. A spanner is the only tool needed, and I keep those on the headstock.

    Call me lazy, I can't see the reason to need a lever to do the same change over.
    I do.. my Colchester changes from metric to imperial by flipping a lever in less than a second. I know the changing of gears isn't a big job but it's just another thing to do...

  11. Likes MerlinXPV liked this post
  12. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    6,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    748
    Likes (Received)
    2356

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by isaac338 View Post
    I do.. my Colchester changes from metric to imperial by flipping a lever in less than a second. I know the changing of gears isn't a big job but it's just another thing to do...
    Yep! Just another thing to do. Such is life. I try to appreciate every action. It gives me a warm fuzzy feeling when I do.

  13. Likes M.B. Naegle liked this post
  14. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    129
    Likes (Received)
    147

    Default

    New LeBlond

  15. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    11,736
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    8984

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lanso View Post
    New LeBlond
    Made in Taiwan.

  16. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Kentucky
    Posts
    220
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    34
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    In the process of getting prints to make my own transposing gears for my 12-30 hendey. Hendeyman has them and he said he can make the gears for you if need be.I'm opting to make them for the experience even though it would be more cost effective for me to just have them made. One set covers multiple sizes. 12,14 16, is one and I think 18,20,24 is the other.

  17. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    129
    Likes (Received)
    147

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    Made in Taiwan.
    I was afraid of that.

  18. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,578
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    438
    Likes (Received)
    3494

    Default

    LeBlond Regals have been offered with metric threading for decades. The later ones require sliding one gear to choose standard or metric.

  19. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    13,229
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6615
    Likes (Received)
    2561

    Default

    A guy I know has a Cincy Hydrashift with metric gears, too. Just have to flip the spindle and banjo gears over. Really nice machine.

  20. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    727
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    490
    Likes (Received)
    404

    Default

    The Graziano SAG's aren't US made but seem plentiful and very well made. Would fit the bill pretty well. Also seem less beat on used as I am guessing they were pricey new and didn't go to the 200lb gorillas to use.

  21. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Aberdeen, UK
    Posts
    3,620
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1251
    Likes (Received)
    1388

    Default

    A Colchester is not much (if at all) of an upgrade from a half decent Taiwan made lathe.

    I have a pretty low opinion of Colchester lathes - Colchester and Harrison were the two "commodity" British workhorse lathes, of similar (average) quality, but of the two the Harrison is by far the nicer machine to use.

    There are a number of European lathes that match the old American built ones you are looking for, that have the same kind of universal gearing as your modern Taiwanese lathe.

  22. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,090
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    371

    Default

    My Sheldon MW-56-p is capable of metric and imperial threading "when properly equipped". All the M series lathes could be purchased with a single gear to be changed out for metric threading. It's a quick change gear that takes all of about 30 seconds to change. I have no idea how popular the option was or how many change gears were sold after the fact. I doubt it was very popular option in this country until the 1980's. That's about the time the auto industry started slowly moving to the metric system

  23. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    midlands,UK
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1625
    Likes (Received)
    1541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    A Colchester is not much (if at all) of an upgrade from a half decent Taiwan made lathe.

    I have a pretty low opinion of Colchester lathes - Colchester and Harrison were the two "commodity" British workhorse lathes, of similar (average) quality, but of the two the Harrison is by far the nicer machine to use.

    There are a number of European lathes that match the old American built ones you are looking for, that have the same kind of universal gearing as your modern Taiwanese lathe.
    I would be interested in why a Harrison is nicer than a Colchester? I too am not a Colchester fan ,they're OK when near to new but I can only afford old ,by which time they are overpriced and worn out IMO.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •