US made engine lathes that cut metric threads? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    I don't get the reluctance to change gears.

    My Mazak Ace changes in less than 5 minutes, and the Weiler LZ330 the same. A spanner is the only tool needed, and I keep those on the headstock.

    Call me lazy, I can't see the reason to need a lever to do the same change over.
    I'm reluctant to change gears on the headstock, I mean, really, I have to flip this lever over there to get a different speed? So yeah, I definitely need metric on a lever (although even that is too much work )

  2. #22
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    Haas TL-1 (one with hand wheels) -I thought Riverside tool and die had one much longer than 30" but I don't see any like that now.

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    Monarch made a Inch/Metric EE, maybe still do, but hold onto your wallet.

  4. #24
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    Funny you should mention the TL-1. I recently got pricing on a new 14x40 manual lathe ("new LeBlond"/Turnmaster/etc) with variable speed and DRO -- came in north of $20k . I'm most of the way to a TL-1 by then.

    Regards.

    Mike

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    I've never had to do the 127T gear swap to get metric threading. Once you install that, how do you set the rest of the geartrain to get the thread pitch you need on a lathe that doesn't have legend plates to match?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    I've never had to do the 127T gear swap to get metric threading. Once you install that, how do you set the rest of the geartrain to get the thread pitch you need on a lathe that doesn't have legend plates to match?
    Well the usual answer is to open the manual to the correct page, and make things look like the picture there.

    In all seriousness, if the lack of a placard is the key holdup point, buy one of the placards too.

    In my (admittedly not 'all encompassing!') experience, even the likes of Colchester came with sets of gears to be swapped in for various thread pitch sets that were not available by simply sliding a lever into position. As I recall, the Schaublin 150 I used to use, too. They were actually shown on the plate on the machine, and were the first place to check, when things were not coming out as planned, as far as thread pitches go.

    Short of going full CNC, it would seem to me that eventually you will have to change over a gear set every once in a while, or turn away the jobs that don't match what you have installed.

    Cheers
    Trev

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  8. #27
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    As far as Monarch lathes that do both inch/metric the already mentioned 10EE and the late 613-614 series lathes were available with that option. I was looking at a 2013 613 Monarch that I would have liked but for the asking price. It was over my budget but not out of the realm of possibilities for a nice late Monarch.

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by sable View Post
    I would be interested in why a Harrison is nicer than a Colchester? I too am not a Colchester fan ,they're OK when near to new but I can only afford old ,by which time they are overpriced and worn out IMO.
    If you've never used an M series Harrison before, they have about the nicest apron controls of any lathe I've ever used.

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  11. #29
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    Hardinge made a lathe with inch/metric threading, the HVLH model. Martin

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    Quote Originally Posted by sable View Post
    I would be interested in why a Harrison is nicer than a Colchester? I too am not a Colchester fan ,they're OK when near to new but I can only afford old ,by which time they are overpriced and worn out IMO.
    Ive always thought of them as similar to the point of preferring the Colchester.
    I suppose colchesters hold their money(if your a dealer that is!) because they are useful with full screwcutting big spindle bore for size. Speed range and big capacity for area taken up.
    Must say my mastif feels like a pos if ive spent time on the dsg or holbrook!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    I need a better engine lathe in the 16x40 inch range. I'd like to have something US made, like a Monarch, American, Lodge and Shipley, etc. However, I need to be able to cut metric threads.

    I understand that any lathe can cut any threads with the right change gears. But, did any US lathes cut metric threads without the need to change gears? I've done a bit of searching, and it seems like maybe some of the later South Bend lathes can cut metric.

    Are there any models I should look out for? My current Taiwan special can cut US threads from 1.5 TPI up to I think 100, plus metric and DP threads, and it can cut 13 TPI, all with no unbolting of gears.
    Could be you are chasing a Unicorn, and a long-dead - or at least badly worn-out - one at that.

    Best inch/metric all-manual lathe in value-for-money for a revenoo - not 'hobby' shop is probably a newer and better-grade Taiwanese or South-Korean lathe not terribly different in design from the one you already have.

    "Western Europe" still has a few entrants, but DAMNED few are still in current production as their best makers have gone over to all-CNC anyway.

    Survivors are far more costly, not easy to support, sometimes more 'fragile' to boot.

    Also - realistically for what you NEED - Euro-goods are not necessarily any better Day Job performers than the best of Taiwanese or Korean machines in any case.

    10EE + HBX-360-BC (coming), but I am NOW nought but a hobbyist/retiree.

    I'd not recommend EITHER of those to a "revenue" shop, even if free, brand-new, and with plentiful spare parts included.

    Too DAMNED SHORT, the both of them, (20" & 28") for the sort of tasking YOU ordinarily have to deal with, more than any other parameter.

    Your space and its overhead are not 'free', are they?

    Everything under-roof has to EARN its crust.

    You like "Made in USA"? Hardly alone on that.

    But pragmatically, best to let that be what YOU make in the USA, and worry little about where the machines you make it ON were themselves made. Too few options, and there is nobody making manuals NOW that needs your spend.

    Skilled craftsmen who made manual lathes in the USA are retired, if not buried, already.

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    my dean smith grace cuts metric threads. It is a 13x36 (or something close to 36-can check if needed) weighing around #4000. Also has lead screw and motor reverse to get back to start of the thread, on the same lever as the clutch engagement

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    Metric threading with an inch lead screw is a major PITA, buy a good set of tap and die
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    Metric threading with an inch lead screw is a major PITA, buy a good set of tap and die
    Bob
    Yah, that's going to work well when I need say 300mm of 6mm pitch LH thread on 40mm 316 stainless steel shafting....

    My 'solution' to this problem is to have 2 lathes, one with a metric leadscrew. I think the better answer in the 21st C is to get a CNC lathe and move on to problems money can't solve.

    PDW

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  19. #35
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    My South Bend is 16x60 and cuts metric threads with a simple lever flip.

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    Here is a Monarch 2013 not the one I was looking at for sale, make an offer.
    2/13" X 54" MONARCH ENGINE LATHE, 12-15 RPM, DRO, STEADY, INCH/METRIC


    The big Monarchs are really fine lathes, mine came from Exxon/Mobil and, for a nearly 60 year old machine, it is remarkably tight with little wear.

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    If you've never used an M series Harrison before, they have about the nicest apron controls of any lathe I've ever used.
    There was a pretty clean looking M400 for sale locally and it looks like a fantastic machine. Seller started out around $8k and was around $6k the last I saw it. The M400 looks way more capable than the M300, but I have never used either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by traditional-tools View Post
    There was a pretty clean looking M400 for sale locally and it looks like a fantastic machine. Seller started out around $8k and was around $6k the last I saw it. The M400 looks way more capable than the M300, but I have never used either.
    Yes the M400 is much bigger and stronger.

  23. #39
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    Standard Modern makes a 16" lathe that does exactly what you want. They are made in Canada. The ones I've had and have are very good quality. Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    Metric threading with an inch lead screw is a major PITA, buy a good set of tap and die
    Bob
    Bob,
    Normally, I would agree with you, but I came across the Multi-fix internal and external threading tool holders a few years ago. They have a very repeatable tool retraction lever and work brilliantly. This is especially true if you have a lead screw reverser on your lathe. The only down side is they are scarce and expensive when you find them. In use, single point threading is faster with these than using a threading indicator.


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