Vascomax350 Maraging steel as a tail stock quill
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    Default Vascomax350 Maraging steel as a tail stock quill

    I have a piece of this and was wondering if it would work as a tail stock quill material? What would be the pros and cons? Thanks in advance.

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    Maraging 350 should make a great TS quill, provided you have the tools to machine it and facility to age-harden it. You may be able to machine it close to final size, if not final size, and then age and not have it warp. You'll have to look up whether a size change is expected on the diameter after aging. If you have access to a cylindrical grinder, great. If not, you can lap the OD, but finishing the taper socket in the hardened state will be a problem without an internal grinder. The material is very expensive, but has really nice mechanical properties, and it takes on a nice oxide finish that is resistant to atmospheric corrosion. You are lucky to have it.

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    My plan is to machine it to +.010 inside and out the harden then send for grind. Not familiar with the age-hardening will have to do some home work on that.
    Thanks for the info.

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    That's one hellaciously expensive material to use for a lathe quill, $750 for a 2" x 12" rod.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    That's one hellaciously expensive material to use for a lathe quill, $750 for a 2" x 12" rod.
    Yup, what machine is this for ?

    A 7 x 12 HF ?....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    That's one hellaciously expensive material to use for a lathe quill, $750 for a 2" x 12" rod.
    Is it the cobalt that makes it so costly, or just cause "they can"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Yup, what machine is this for ?

    A 7 x 12 HF ?....
    Hey if you got it use it...right

    Sounds like it's good stuff but may be a bit overkill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Hey if you got it use it...right

    Sounds like it's good stuff but may be a bit overkill.
    Did someone say "Overkill" ?
    Men At Work - Overkill (Video Version) - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Is it the cobalt that makes it so costly, or just cause "they can"?
    Probably a lot of both.

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    It would be a waste of expensive material. Vascomax's niche is where very high strength is needed, or high strength to weight. A tailstock needs neither.

    In a tailstock surface hardness is important to keep from scarring the taper. Rigidity is important, but the only practical means to increase rigidity is a larger diameter. Case hardened 1018 would do just as well as Vascomax, but I would probably use a pre hard and skip the heat treatment given the low value of the lathe.

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    So I will probably shelve the material and find a different piece of material. We have about 5 feet of 2.5 dia that has been sitting a shelf since the mid 60's so it will probably sit for another few decades... Not sure where the idea of the cheap lathe came from but it isn't a china machine. I found a piece of Ultimo 200 that will probably work. Thanks again for all the input.

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    I have cleaned a few tail stock quills and most of them machine like 1144

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    I have inspected quite a few tail stock quills from around the world, Hardinge, Smart and Brown, Standard Modern, Sheldon and a few from Europe and they all seem quite soft. Why wouldn't they harden them like a spindle?

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    Its nice to be able to machine the end of the quill after reaming or if tooling needs clearance for some other reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by legoboy View Post
    I have inspected quite a few tail stock quills from around the world, Hardinge, Smart and Brown, Standard Modern, Sheldon and a few from Europe and they all seem quite soft. Why wouldn't they harden them like a spindle?
    If the tool slips in the taper, it still makes a mess, fully hardened or not. My pillar drill has a fully hard surfaced spindle socket and it's still got a gouge in it from something. It's just more of a bitch trying to clean it up when it is that hard. Be better to have something that a reamer will scrape effectively.


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