Welding with plain steel filler? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1341

    Default

    I remember learning in class that the first welding rods were French? made wire wrapped with paper. Ala paper mache. latter on the paper would be soaked or rolled in special chemicals/dust/powder before wrapping.
    Bil lD

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    8,097
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1161
    Likes (Received)
    2786

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Newman109 View Post
    I've used metal coat hangers to gas weld in a pinch. Works OK.
    The filler material of choice when repairing two stroke motorbike expansion chambers!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    ch
    Posts
    2,583
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    220
    Likes (Received)
    341

    Default

    so coat hanger wire is mild steel?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    579
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14
    Likes (Received)
    38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I remember learning in class that the first welding rods were French? made wire wrapped with paper. Ala paper mache. latter on the paper would be soaked or rolled in special chemicals/dust/powder before wrapping.
    Bil lD
    Yes, and a few years ago on another similar thread one of the posters mentioned that he seen workers in africa (one of the poorer areas... guinea, benin, ?) make their rods themselves by rolling wire in magazine paper. Something about the cellulose makes it work.
    Science is one thing, a hack another, and sometimes they meet.
    Even Oskar Kjellberg (the O.K. in Esab OKxx rods) had to start somewhere.

    .

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    6,351
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    854
    Likes (Received)
    3183

    Default

    When I was about 10, my father took me to the local welding place with him while he bought some welding rod for his arc welder. This was so long ago, people at welding shops actually sold supplies and knew how to weld, too. Anyhow, a guy there was setting up to weld something, so I was watching him, and I asked 'Is that a TIG welder?'.

    He said, "No. This is MIG. It uses wire on a spool. When you use one of those long skinny rods, that's TIG. And when you run out of rods and use a coat hanger, that's NIG." He seemed bemused though I had no idea why.

  6. Likes Kiwi2wheels liked this post
  7. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1341

    Default

    I think the cellulose burns off and makes CO2 using up the oxygen in the air around the rod tip. You have to do something to keep regular air, with oxygen, away from the weld pool until it cools enough. That is how submerged arc works I guess. I have seen a picture of welders inside a Soviet submarine in hard hat diving suits. The interior was flooded with the inert gas not just the weld pool.
    Bil lD

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    25,516
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    5274

    Default

    Welder at work told me, "leave the coating on the hanger wire. It's sorta like a flux" when he suggest coat hanger as filler wire for oxy-acet welding.

    Worked great, bmw motorbike fenders trap water in certain places and rust out there. Hole saw to saw out the rusted areas, punched out pieces of 1018 sized to fit into the holes, and the famous coat hanger filler rod with the torch.

    I really did suggest removing the varnish, but he was adamant - leave it on.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Metro-Boston, MA, USA
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    12
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Another good material for 'economy' rods if you are dealing with Stainless is old bicycle wheel spokes... Here at Artisan's Asylum, our TIG welding instructor (who used to build titanium bike frames) also does a lot of recycled metal sculpture such as robots, 'ray-guns' and SF style rocket ships. He also runs SCUL our resident bike club which specializes in recycling and building strange bikes (tall-bikes, choppers and even more unusual). This gets a LOT of junked wheels, and even on relatively cheap bikes they use stainless spokes...

    He initially started using the spokes as rods for adding decorative features like 'buttons' or 'rivet heads' but has since experimented and found that they are using a really good grade of stainless (I forget the exact alloy but it is relatively common) and that it makes nice strong welds for (non-critical of course) structural assembly...
    (if you want to see some of his work, Duck-Duck for "Skunkadelia")

    ex-Gooserider


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •