What causing this "galling"? - Page 7
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  1. #121
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    Default Thread cutting SAE 1018

    Quote Originally Posted by FlyinChip View Post
    and... I thought this course thread on mild steel would be easy !

    good point I bought 1018, who knows if was accidentally mixed up though? more likely it's my technique and lack of experience. will keep trying but will have to switch back to HSS and learn to make my own bits.

    Confused though about coming in at 29.5 degrees or whatever. The tool is 60 degrees and going into a straight surface. It's gonna cut both sides of the point anyway, no?
    Set your compound at 29 1/2 degrees. Use your thread gage and set set-up your 60 degree ground threading tool-bit for a 60 degree thread in the work piece. Always use oil when cutting threads. Use the compound set at 29 1/2 degrees and feed in .003 at a time; only cutting with one side of the too-bit. When your close to finish use the cross slide to go straight-in to obtain the correct 60 degree thread-form. Make several passes without adding the depth of cut to smooth and straighten up the thread. Inspect for size. Go to the store and purchase some lard. Mix with let say 20 weight oil or whatever you have in the shop. Lard is Animal fat (Tallow). This is "Old School" and cheap. Liquid friction is always less than solid friction. As mentioned SAE1018 can be difficult to thread. A different alloy 12l17 or any other free machining steel could provide considerably better results. Check the Machinery Handbook.

    All The Best,
    Roger

  2. #122
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    Default

    glad you had success. Some steels just thread nasty, that's why it's worth troubleshooting/ learning on something forgiving like plastic


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