what clamps work well to hold work to fixture plates without holes? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    John, good idea. The angle plate I am a bit loath to fill with holes. It is hand scraped, 10x12x8, reinforced, heavy, and a good match for the work envelope of the machine's vertical axis. And quite accurate: the four corners test to .0001" measured from the spindle. The plate has ¼-20 holes along the outside edges (i.e. not in the face). So I could do as grinders do, and add a stop along three sides and block the work. For a pusher I could use some Starrett adjustable wedge parallels, or the ¼-20 screws. Only problem I can see is that gravity and vibration are both working against the setup being stable since the ¼-20 srews are not very strong.

    I added two mounting holes for the work, as seen in the photos, but I still need to do some work that involves removing the screws holding the work to the plate, so I need to solve the problem.

    img_1084.jpg


    img_1087.jpg

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by rimcanyon View Post
    John, good idea. The angle plate I am a bit loath to fill with holes. It is hand scraped, 10x12x8, reinforced, heavy, and a good match for the work envelope of the machine's vertical axis. And quite accurate: the four corners test to .0001" measured from the spindle. The plate has ¼-20 holes along the outside edges (i.e. not in the face). So I could do as grinders do, and add a stop along three sides and block the work. For a pusher I could use some Starrett adjustable wedge parallels, or the ¼-20 screws. Only problem I can see is that gravity and vibration are both working against the setup being stable since the ¼-20 srews are not very strong.

    I added two mounting holes for the work, as seen in the photos, but I still need to do some work that involves removing the screws holding the work to the plate, so I need to solve the problem.

    img_1084.jpg


    img_1087.jpg
    It ain't broke. It is borderline "legendary" accurate? Why mess with success?

    Bite that bullet. Leave it TF alone as your critical-tasking or even layout & inspection bedrock.

    Get you one or more OTHER "workaday" angle plates!

    They don't actually "eat" much ... given how long they can last.. and and be "retuned" if/as when need-be.

    Even a local weldment or a Chinee-marginal can can be improved without shedding any tears over its "mutilation".

    Inja made and Taiwanese cast goods decent enough to bother exporting to the North American or EU market may not even NEED much, either? Cheap ain't always the same as stoopid. Better than "just wishing" anyway.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Another solution is to fit ''stop blocks'' so the part can't slide about.
    I have been known to use either crazy glue, or loctite on occasion. In addition to the clamps. Yep, loctite the part right onto the machine, do the job. A bit of heat from the heat gun frees it.

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    1 piece? 100 pieces?

    If it's low quantity, just slow down feeds/speeds/DOC....

    Second having threaded holes to use strap clamps. Also, prefer Kant-Twist over C-clamps.... If you tap a pattern of holes for future.



    Heavy Duty™ T-Slot Clamps | Mitee-Bite Products LLC.

    check them, lots of stuff to ponder

  6. #25
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    C-clamps twist and can cause the work pcs. to twist. Use parallel clamps if your using clamps.

  7. #26
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    Are you positive the workpiece was moving on the angle plate? None of the three holddown nuts on the angle plate visible in your photo are on studs that are long enough, their top ends are somewhere down in the nut threads.

    Yes, the angle plate is probably more securely attached to the machine table than the workpiece is to the angle plate, but it's worth checking. In any case, hard stops in the table slots -- or fixture keys in the angle plate -- would be more useful lily gilding.

    Longer studs for the T-nuts, ideally just long enough so that, when fully threaded into the T-nuts, a half-stud-diameter length of the stud protrudes from the T-nut isn't lily-gilding . . . just good basic fixturing practice.

  8. #27
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    You can use those holes in the outside edges of the angle plate for pusher bolts. Make up a couple ½" ×1" × 3" or so blocks of steel and drill a through hole for a bolt to fasten to the side of the angle plate via one of the existing holes. Drill and tap a hole in the other end for a pusher bolt. Set your part height up such that the centerline falls close to the existing holes in the side of the angle plate so the pusher is hitting on centerline. Do the same on top to push down or if necessary add a long strap clamp over the top with a stud down to the table.

    In addition to John's comments about ensuring the angle plates are secure, I used to install pushers on the angle plates themselves also. Your machine probably isn't capable of pushing anywhere near as hard as the machines I used to run, so that may be unnecessary - but if you want to be sure nothing moves, all of those together will do it.

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  10. #28
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    I added a couple of additional holes for a pair of mitee bite clamps. The lightweight c-clamps are the only clamps I have that would fit below the cutter head. But this is just for engraving, the t-slot is done. I still need to recut the bolt hole counter-bore that got screwed up initially, but just for cosmetic sake.

    John, I agree about the nuts not being fully engaged. No excuses there.

    Eric, good suggestion, I will give it a try

    Attachment 316397

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    i want to go back to apprenticeship, but this time under ekretz lol. always with the solid advice. he's like the optimistic positive reinforcement version of John Welden lol


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Well shucks, thanks! Glad to be helpful where I can. There are a good core of other guys here who really know their stuff and that give excellent advice too. A lot of times I read a question and find that what I was about to say has already been said - sometimes more than once!

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    Is there a reason you can't just buy a Kurt milling vise and be done with it?

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    I agree! Parallel clamps are the most useful type of clamps in this situation, and, I'm saying this from experience as I've met with this problem before. If I was you, I would also use a vibratory bowl feeder as it helps with the small parts and components in the process. I have been a fan of the products sold on the platform Vibratory Bowl Feeders - Linear Conveyors - Escapements - Sandfield Engineering - Bowl Feeder Solutions - Linear Feeders - Belt Conveyors - Bulk Loaders, as they have good quality and great pricing. If you don't know where to find reliable clamps as well, you should try theirs, I promise you won't regret it.

  18. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    I have done the "paper trick," but with soft sheet copper between a rough cast surface and the vise jaws or an angle plate. I like Kant-Twist clamps or the old Enco brand copies, but my first choice is always the step blocks and strap clamp set wherever possible.

    Larry
    In Ox's book ("Sink or Swim in Metalwork", IIRC) he suggest using soft copper for non-marking vice jaws. If some of the knowledge he shared in the book holds for this application, it's pretty important to use copper, but not brass, for this application.

    I'm kind of surprised that no one has come up with sheets of "super stick". Perhaps typing paper works about as well as anything. But a Kevlar(R) sheet with tetrahedral diamond crystals or something...???


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