What is the difference between a Sucker Rod Thread, and a normal thread? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    The sucker rod threads used to be cut using geometric die heads for many years with standard 10 pitch 60 deg vee dies. Single point cutting threads are very common using a insert for the A.P.I. 10 Round thread form for tubing threads to get the round root. Pitch diameters from what I recall follow any other standard ANSI 10 pitch threads. We never used any thing special for cutting these threads. As for Weatherfords "rolled" threads, it's more of a sales tactic than anything else. Yes, it add a little strength to the thread section and you might get 50,000 cycles of 10 million cycles of service more, but generall other things happen before a sucker rod pin gives up. Generally the sucker rod string will last up to 10 to 20 times longer than the rod pumps and slick joints will hold up to. Also, there are hundreds of wireline and service tools that uses sucker rod threads for it's connections that genreally wear out from make up/ break out and never see one pulled into. 3/4-10 is a very popular size used on wireline tools too.

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    The sucker rod threads used to be cut using geometric die heads for many years with standard 10 pitch 60 deg vee dies. Single point cutting threads are very common using a insert for the A.P.I. 10 Round thread form for tubing threads to get the round root. Pitch diameters from what I recall follow any other standard ANSI 10 pitch threads. We never used any thing special for cutting these threads. As for Weatherfords "rolled" threads, it's more of a sales tactic than anything else. Yes, it add a little strength to the thread section and you might get 50,000 cycles of 10 million cycles of service more, but generall other things happen before a sucker rod pin gives up. Generally the sucker rod string will last up to 10 to 20 times longer than the rod pumps and slick joints will hold up to. Also, there are hundreds of wireline and service tools that uses sucker rod threads for it's connections that genreally wear out from make up/ break out and never see one pulled into. 3/4-10 is a very popular size used on wireline tools too.

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    I do not cut API sucker rod threads every day, but have cut several over the years.

    It has always been my impression that the nominal size of sucker rods refers to the size of round stock between the two upset ends, not directly to the thread size where they screw together.

    Both ends of the sucker rods are upset, so that the root of both threads (M/F) can be machined larger than the NOMINAL sucker rod designation, such as 5/8 or 3/4, for strenght reasons.

    Consequently the 3/4-10 API sucker rod thread is considerably larger than a 3/4-10 bolt thread.

    As was said earlier, the dims are not posted in my brain, but IIRC the OD of a 5/8 sucker rod thread is in the vicinity of .910 to .925 inch. If this is not right, someone is sure to set me straight.

    Around here there are a lot of very old shallow oil and gas wells that have sucker rods that pre-date the API standards, and are known as NON-API threads.

    Grady Smith
    Marietta, Ohio

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    I do not cut API sucker rod threads every day, but have cut several over the years.

    It has always been my impression that the nominal size of sucker rods refers to the size of round stock between the two upset ends, not directly to the thread size where they screw together.

    Both ends of the sucker rods are upset, so that the root of both threads (M/F) can be machined larger than the NOMINAL sucker rod designation, such as 5/8 or 3/4, for strenght reasons.

    Consequently the 3/4-10 API sucker rod thread is considerably larger than a 3/4-10 bolt thread.

    As was said earlier, the dims are not posted in my brain, but IIRC the OD of a 5/8 sucker rod thread is in the vicinity of .910 to .925 inch. If this is not right, someone is sure to set me straight.

    Around here there are a lot of very old shallow oil and gas wells that have sucker rods that pre-date the API standards, and are known as NON-API threads.

    Grady Smith
    Marietta, Ohio

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    I do not cut API sucker rod threads every day, but have cut several over the years.

    It has always been my impression that the nominal size of sucker rods refers to the size of round stock between the two upset ends, not directly to the thread size where they screw together.

    Both ends of the sucker rods are upset, so that the root of both threads (M/F) can be machined larger than the NOMINAL sucker rod designation, such as 5/8 or 3/4, for strenght reasons.

    Consequently the 3/4-10 API sucker rod thread is considerably larger than a 3/4-10 bolt thread.

    As was said earlier, the dims are not posted in my brain, but IIRC the OD of a 5/8 sucker rod thread is in the vicinity of .910 to .925 inch. If this is not right, someone is sure to set me straight.

    Around here there are a lot of very old shallow oil and gas wells that have sucker rods that pre-date the API standards, and are known as NON-API threads.

    Grady Smith
    Marietta, Ohio

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    Thanks again guys!

    I think the pitch diameter is .895-.915 if I read the drawing correct??!!??

    Does this sound right?

    Doug.

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    Thanks again guys!

    I think the pitch diameter is .895-.915 if I read the drawing correct??!!??

    Does this sound right?

    Doug.

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    Thanks again guys!

    I think the pitch diameter is .895-.915 if I read the drawing correct??!!??

    Does this sound right?

    Doug.

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    Since your the one looking at the drawing...

    But a PD with a .020 range sure does not sound right to me...

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    Since your the one looking at the drawing...

    But a PD with a .020 range sure does not sound right to me...

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    Since your the one looking at the drawing...

    But a PD with a .020 range sure does not sound right to me...

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    The pitch dia. range of .020" maybe correct but the pitch diameter does not match up with any API standard sucker rod thread. The common ones are .750-10, .938-10, and 1.063-10. These threads have fairly sloppy thread fits and clearances.

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    The pitch dia. range of .020" maybe correct but the pitch diameter does not match up with any API standard sucker rod thread. The common ones are .750-10, .938-10, and 1.063-10. These threads have fairly sloppy thread fits and clearances.

  14. #54
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    The pitch dia. range of .020" maybe correct but the pitch diameter does not match up with any API standard sucker rod thread. The common ones are .750-10, .938-10, and 1.063-10. These threads have fairly sloppy thread fits and clearances.

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    hey doug where did u get this info?
    Quote Originally Posted by doug925 View Post
    Thanks again guys!

    I think the pitch diameter is .895-.915 if I read the drawing correct??!!??

    Does this sound right?

    Doug.

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    I worked at LMT Fette once upon a time, and they handled a lot of people that thread rolled them, a requirement for strength. The bigger difference is the speed it rolls the threads on, in usually a couple seconds? versus about 15-20 cutting it. Most aircraft hardware is rolled as is a lot of auto, there too for the same reasons above. They even roll the ID threads too, not faster, but it is stronger

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    Super old thread brought up from the dead twice......but my info shows 3/4 sucker rod thread pin major OD as 1.061". I have only cut them a few times in 25yrs. I dont know where they even get the 3/4" designation. They all have the same pitch and form and require and insert specifically ground for Sucker Rod thread specs.

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    Wow!!!!
    Talk about nostalgia!

    IIRC, I was able to just turn the threads.
    Sheesh! It was 2007...
    Now I feel OLD!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark McGrath View Post
    Wild west
    .
    And roll forming is definitely not a specialised process but I don`t think you know much about that either.A roll forming head is just another piece of tooling the same as a tapping head,diebox and all the other pieces of tooling in use in machine shops.
    Mr Mcgrath.
    OK ,lets have a pole How many of the guys reading this have actually rolled a thread with a thread rolling head?I have worked in 10 diferent tool and die job shops 50 pluss years. The only time That I ever saw a thread rolling head was a high production operation,making electrical ground rods.Some of the rods were threaded on one end so that they could be coupled together,if more length was needed.I never saw a thread rolling head used in a normal none production machine shop. Nowdays the OP would probably CUT the thread on a cnc lathe using an insert with a full root radius. These inserts are used for making threads used in lifting devices. Edwin Dirnbeck

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    Quote Originally Posted by edwin dirnbeck View Post
    OK ,lets have a pole How many of the guys reading this have actually rolled a thread with a thread rolling head?I have worked in 10 diferent tool and die job shops 50 pluss years. The only time That I ever saw a thread rolling head was a high production operation,making electrical ground rods.Some of the rods were threaded on one end so that they could be coupled together,if more length was needed.I never saw a thread rolling head used in a normal none production machine shop. Nowdays the OP would probably CUT the thread on a cnc lathe using an insert with a full root radius. These inserts are used for making threads used in lifting devices. Edwin Dirnbeck
    Nice....dredge up and argue the points of a posting by a DEAD MEMBER.
    Just because YOU never saw thread rolling, don't make it "Rare".

    Lot's-O-Class there Mister Dirnbeck.....
    Last edited by digger doug; 02-15-2019 at 07:50 PM.


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