What do you do with nylatron chips? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    If in the right neighborhood put 2 aluminum cans in the bag with the cans touching and facing up so the outline can be seen from outside the bag. Place outside when going home. During the night someone will "recycle" the bags. (or cut hole in them to get can out.

  2. #22
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    If there is any contamination no one will recycle them, outside of the fence post type deal. As a processor dicking around with that type of recyclate is a total PIA. Just trying to dry it enough to melt it is not feasible. Nylon takes forever to dry once it has absorbed any moisture, like leaving a bag of pellets open for a week. If it were polyethylene and perfectly clean then you may be able to find someone to take it.

  3. #23
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    This stuff does not "melt" like water. The term melting simply refers to the rather abrupt change in physical properties that is exhibited by crystalline materials. In injection molding or extrusion, where this stuff is processed, the melt stream is very viscous, somewhat like peanut butter. Shear, as through a nozzle or gating system, will decrease the viscosity, allowing it to fill out the mold. It takes hydraulic pressure to force the melt into a mold or extrusion.

    What you think of as being a lot of waste, to a molder is nothing. In pellet form, nylon is sold by the gaylord or carload to big molders. Cost is around $1.80 a pound. Unless the scrap is kept segregated and clean, to the molder it is without value. Even when regrinds are used, seldom is more than 30% regrind mixed with virgin material. There are companies that recycle all manner of plastic waste. How they process them and into what products, I have no idea.

    Tom

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  5. #24
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    My chips = worthless. got it.

    Now if I could just find a shot glass mold for a couple bucks on e Bay that I could put in my Battenfield... Scrap plastic? False, Party favors!

    Merry Wednesday!

    -Parker

  6. #25
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    Targets might be a good low tolerance item to mold.....heck their going to shatter
    apart anyhoo.

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  8. #26
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    Get a nice 35 ton Arburg, make golf tees.

    Tom

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    Get a nice 35 ton Arburg, make golf tees.

    Tom
    Interesting story... Years ago, textile machine parts were a big business in the southeast. One company added a cavity to a family mold, to make golf tees, to give to customers. These part were made of glass-filled nylon. The golf courses were destroying their reel mowers, until they tracked down the source of the tees and got them to stop making them.

  10. #28
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    On "How it's made ", They show a company making rail road ties out of them.

  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark costello View Post
    On "How it's made ", They show a company making rail road ties out of them.
    Yabutt....that will be a product with a strict quality control, must pass AAR spec's.

  12. #30
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    Permanent garden mulch? Sort of depends on what chemicals might ooze out...
    Maybe have the customer buy the material, and at the end say "Hey, here's the rest of your material. I'll have to charge you to store it or get rid of it..."

    Chip

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  14. #31
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    Provided that they are clean, they make great packing material.

    Paul

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    I would contact my supplier to find out what they do with their scrap & drops. They may even take your chips to recycle them.
    I don't have very much to dispose of and so have yet to inquire, in my instance.

  16. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpringGunner View Post
    Provided that they are clean, they make great packing material.

    Paul
    I use nylon swarf from my lathe for packing material. Put it in old WalMart bags and get rid of two problems at once! Don't think small chips from a milling operation would work as well.


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