What kind of cast iron is a vise made of typically?
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  1. #1
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    Default What kind of cast iron is a vise made of typically?

    The title says it all,
    I'm looking to machine the back edge of the vise, such that i have a parallel surface to be able to clamp on a vise stop.

    I wanting to anally calculate the exact proper SFM, just for fun, because my machine has a continuously variable spindle speed 0-5000RPM, with a (i assume) fairly accurate optical tach.w/ RPM Readout.
    I know any relatively normal rpm will do, this is mostly a question about what kind of cast iron vises are usually made of. Are all cast iron machinery and machinery related things the same type of cast iron?







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    why would that matter for this 1min 1 off job? you can machine it at 5ft/min or 10rpm or whatever if the spindle motor has enough torque at such low rpm, it will still be quicker than wondering yourself about it and even more so when you spend time making pictures and starting a thread about it

    in any case, you see there is overlap with all 3 of you choices, take 100ft/min and you'll be totally fine, it's CI...

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    I would expect a vise such as that to be gray iron.

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    A good vise made in the last 70 years (since ductile iron came into general use) should be made of ductile iron. Grey iron has relatively poor tensile strength and fracture resistance. Ductile iron behaves a lot like steel. Malleable iron would also be a better choice for a quality vise than grey for the same reasons.

    For your purposes, the question is irrelevant.

    Denis

    Added: "The Kurt 4″ Double Station Vise is a High Density vise in an English configuration. The HDL Anglock vises are high density long vises with 2 clamping stations. They provide repeatable clamping to 0.0002″ and combine high density with heavy duty features. Designed on a rugged 80,000 PSI ductile iron body with steel components, they provide strength, rigidity and long term accuracy while absorbing machining vibration. Jaws for the Kurt Double Station Vise are available in the following options: Hard Jaws, Machinable Aluminum Jaws, or Machinable Ductile Iron Jaws."

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    My bench vise is cast steel. Spark test confirmed that. 1943 Prentiss Bulldog, if anyone is wondering. Has US Navy markings.

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    There are even a few current makers like Yost who cast steel vises. The great majority are iron with crappy ones being grey and any decent iron vise being ductile.

    Denis

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    Quote Originally Posted by pavt View Post
    My bench vise is cast steel. Spark test confirmed that. 1943 Prentiss Bulldog, if anyone is wondering. Has US Navy markings.

    I can report my 18" shaper vise is cast steel - made by the serious folks at OHIO

    The double screw job and about 600 Lbs

    ohio-vise.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    There are even a few current makers like Yost who cast steel vises. The great majority are iron with crappy ones being grey and any decent iron vise being grey.

    Denis
    Wow I didn't know they were still around -- thanks for the tip!

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    the title does not say it all.....like what kind of vise?

    then again, I was able to speculate you probably weren't filing or hacksawing in FPM

    I don't think anyone can say what your vise is made of, not all brands are going to be same. If you know the make, look it up and see if they make any claims. Besides, for a one of job, does it matter?

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    such a cutting speed table is pretty much useles. cutting speed mainly depend on hardness. cast irons have a hardness between 100 and 500 hbn. you adjust the speed proportionally (roughly). no idea why grey iron should have the lowest speed, the carbon flakes add lubricity and break chips.

    (btw, the different kinds of ci frequently listed are somewhat missleading, as there are many sub classes and many castings fall inbetween. i suspect many (bench) vices are cast out of what they happened to put in the melting pot.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post

    Denis

    Added: "The Kurt 4″ Double Station Vise is a High Density vise in an English configuration. The HDL Anglock vises are high density long vises with 2 clamping stations. They provide repeatable clamping to 0.0002″ and combine high density with heavy duty features. Designed on a rugged 80,000 PSI ductile iron body with steel components, they provide strength, rigidity and long term accuracy while absorbing machining vibration. Jaws for the Kurt Double Station Vise are available in the following options: Hard Jaws, Machinable Aluminum Jaws, or Machinable Ductile Iron Jaws."

    What is English configuration compared to US configuration?

    Is this just Imperial measurements not metric?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lionelt View Post
    What is English configuration compared to US configuration?

    Is this just Imperial measurements not metric?
    Yes, it appears that they used “English” when most folks would have used “Imperial.”

    Kurt Workholding's 4" and 6" HDL manual vises are high density vises with English threads and are compact to allow for maximum workholding across a range of machining centers.”

    Denis

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