What kind of steel is used in heavy duty mower blades for excavators? - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    what makes it convert?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    what makes it convert?
    I'll bet "Work Hardening".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Heavey Metal View Post
    Any steel such as ar 400, hard ox etc is strictly for wear and very dangerous to use as a structural part.

    Ar steel is made from a 514 melt that has gone bad and boron is added to make a specific hardness only no properties are given to the steel.

    Toughness is far more important than hardness in a cutter blade.

    Kind of stupid to take on the liability of producing your own blades for a commercial operator when oem blades are available.
    Boron when added to steel is a grain refiner, very efficient even in tiny amounts, also combines with carbon and nitrogen to form boron carbonitride, tough stuff helps with crack resistance,
    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Reminds me of the teeth of a beaver- they wear in a specific fashion that makes them self sharpening.
    Ward, you were a little hard on the beaver last night ....

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I'll bet "Work Hardening".
    not at all. work harening involves strain, plastic deformation and dislocation within the grain structure. in this case high manganese steels are used (hadfield steel) that miraculously harden upon impact or friction without loosing toughness. a prerequisite is that the austenitic structure is retained. no martensite there. maybe somebody more knowledgeble can explain better.

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  7. #66
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    Retained austenite, if I recall put to levels of 25%, converts to untempered martensite by physical scuffing, or work hardening if you prefer. Work hardening is somewhat of a misnomer as it is truly a different process.

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    Dian, I should have read your post before my last reply. The high level of austenite is retained throughout the structure, sub surface. The way I understand it is that the scuffed surface is fully converted to martensite as if it were quenched. An austenitic structure is relatively soft and remains in the core til exposed at the surface during the wear process.


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