What kind of tree 2uvrc is this !?
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    Default What kind of tree 2uvrc is this !?

    Hello everyone , I’m new here . I have a small hobby “machine” shop in my garage, large Stanley lathe , Chinese vertical mill and some tools . I just purchased a tree 2uvrc for a few hundred dollars , but not like and 2uvr I’ve ever seen or been able to find a picture of on the internet. The milling head is attached on a large horizontal track , also has some other tool attached to the track on the right ( Gettys transducer? ) , there is no hand wheels or dials , I’m not sure if this mill can be manually operated it’s current state . It was a “right time , right place , right now” type of deal and the guy getting rid of it didn’t know anything about it except I was told that the owner of the machine “lost the programmer” , no idea what that means . So my question is basically , do I put this machine in my garage or leave it on my trailer and figure out something else to do with it . Any information on it would is appreciated .
    Thanks , dan












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    Looks like a tracer mill. The right head is a probe that would follow a physical model and the left head did the cutting. Kinda like stone age CNC, but hard to keep accurate. I've heard of some guys retrofitting similar mills to be a regular CNC and others modified to be manual mills. Neither are really worth time/money unless you already have the machine and want a challenge.

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    Thanks , I was also thinking that setup was for making copies or something along those lines . Like I said It was right place right time , this shop was being emptied out right across the street where I had unloaded something . and it was either going on my trailer or to the scrap yard ! I was thinking it could be converter to manual ( or button operated with a DRO installed ) but wasn’t sure how much of a project that would be


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    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    Looks like a tracer mill. The right head is a probe that would follow a physical model and the left head did the cutting. Kinda like stone age CNC, but hard to keep accurate. I've heard of some guys retrofitting similar mills to be a regular CNC and others modified to be manual mills. Neither are really worth time/money unless you already have the machine and want a challenge.

    So I do have it on my trailer , but I can just as easily take it to the scrap yard

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    Power it up and see what it can do. Could be a good machine, price was certainly right.
    Maybe it is a parts machine to fix a manual machine if parts interchange. Worst case.

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    not a bad haul, basically the deal is;

    1)what do you have, in terms of the bones of the mill, wear on ways, missing bits, bearings, taper condition, runout.

    2)what do you need/want?

    3)how much time do you have, how much money do you have to make that happen?

    4) if you used that time and money to get what you wanted by other means, would it be less, or more than messing with this one?

    It actually takes significant experience and skills to make good calls on all of these items, but some here will be happy to help if you flesh out the details. if you don't know much about evaluating a mill's condition, for instance, look that up on the internet, but the two most important things to look for are scoring and wear on the visible portion of the knee ways, and play in the middle of travel. with the table in the middle of travel, grab the table and try to move it back and forth with all your weight. if its moving more than 1/16", and the ways look like a glacier scoured them in the last ice age, take it straight to the yard

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    If you want to part it out I might be interested is some of the spindle/head parts (or event the whole head if shipping isn't ridiculous).

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    not a bad haul, basically the deal is;

    1)what do you have, in terms of the bones of the mill, wear on ways, missing bits, bearings, taper condition, runout.

    2)what do you need/want?

    3)how much time do you have, how much money do you have to make that happen?

    4) if you used that time and money to get what you wanted by other means, would it be less, or more than messing with this one?

    It actually takes significant experience and skills to make good calls on all of these items, but some here will be happy to help if you flesh out the details. if you don't know much about evaluating a mill's condition, for instance, look that up on the internet, but the two most important things to look for are scoring and wear on the visible portion of the knee ways, and play in the middle of travel. with the table in the middle of travel, grab the table and try to move it back and forth with all your weight. if its moving more than 1/16", and the ways look like a glacier scoured them in the last ice age, take it straight to the yard
    Thanks ,so the plan is to check the run outs and wear and overall condition after the holidays , it can sit on this trailer for a while . the mill was more covered “garage grime and black dust” from having been litterally covered in parts in the back of this shop for years . But overall the mechanically the machine doesn’t look to bad , ways look ok etc .. but like I said I planned on going over the machine after the holidays , to see if it was good machine or not .

    So as far as “3 & 4” , my actual question was not about the condition but more or less will using the same amount of time and money just buy a Bridgeport or something comparable like you said , I was trying to figure out (if after I confirm the mill does happen to be in great shape) does anyone have any experience converting this style or using it as is ? And any other knowledge about the machine itself not so much the condition


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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Power it up and see what it can do. Could be a good machine, price was certainly right.
    Maybe it is a parts machine to fix a manual machine if parts interchange. Worst case.
    My plan to go over the overall condition after holidays , I was wondering (let’s say that it is in perfect condition) if this was a usable machine of the hassle of converting it to anything would be worth the time.


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    The tracer could be a challenge looking at is overall care that is has had especially being electric.
    Most tracers ive operated were hydraulic. Looks like you should be able to remove the tracer/motors and find some handles if the rest of the mill is good.
    Or... if your up for a challenge and have more time and money than brains. ( no offense I’m in this category except the money part) a centroid acorn and new steppers or servos could be fun.


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    Quote Originally Posted by jkopel View Post
    If you want to part it out I might be interested is some of the spindle/head parts (or event the whole head if shipping isn't ridiculous).
    If I decide it’s going to the scrap (sometime after the holiday) , the head is or whatever parts are yours if your interested What kind of tree 2uvrc is this !?


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    well, as to 4), it will take a lot of time, and some money to make this thing what its not.

    if you just want a decent manual BP type device, I'd say scrap it NOW, and move on.

    if you have lots of time, and want a real project, and you want a cobbled up quasi-cnc, go for it!

    if you happen to want a Tree analog tracer mill, well, for shits sake, are you in luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbowerks View Post
    The tracer could be a challenge looking at is overall care that is has had especially being electric.
    Most tracers ive operated were hydraulic. Looks like you should be able to remove the tracer/motors and find some handles if the rest of the mill is good.
    Or... if your up for a challenge and have more time and money than brains. ( no offense I’m in this category except the money part) a centroid acorn and new steppers or servos could be fun.


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    I definitely don’t want to use this mill as a tracer , I’d love to convert to cnc using a centroid acorn , BUT realistically I’m was leaning towards being able to find and install hand wheels and a DRO , and MAINLY be able to somehow use the power feeds ( which apear to be for every axis )


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    Dont go for a bridgeport, Look for a tree that is compatable with this one.
    Maybe with a bad head motor or worn out head. Transfer this one over and you might get a decent machine for little money, IF you can find the right tree.
    Good thing about the tree is no drawbar. You can use it under a low ceiling.
    I still kick myself for not jumping on one fast enough that was right near me, some years ago....
    edit:
    Handcranks on existing machine sounds great if you can do it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    well, as to 4), it will take a lot of time, and some money to make this thing what its not.

    if you just want a decent manual BP type device, I'd say scrap it NOW, and move on.

    if you have lots of time, and want a real project, and you want a cobbled up quasi-cnc, go for it!

    if you happen to want a Tree analog tracer mill, well, for shits sake, are you in luck!
    Hahahahaha thanks ! Now we’re getting closer to answers I hoping for ! . So yeah, I was most interested in how much time and effort it would be to get some hand wheels in thing and be able to use all the power feeds !

    Secretly I was hoping we were living in a perfect world ! And someone who chime in with “ I had the same mill , just throw some hand wheels on it (inserts link) and your good to go “ hahahahahah


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    I would look at what would it take to make a manual mill out of it. After assessing wear, look at if the drives can be removed and handles installed. It looks like handles may be installable with out removing the drives for the purposes of evaluation. A dro may be needed to measure travel if dials can not be found. It will most likely have ball screws so axis locks will be needed. It looked like it had at least one lock in the pictures. Could not tell for sure in pictures but it appears the head does not nod as a Bridgeport would.

    I have a Gorton 2-30 that was CNC in a prior life that is now manual. I like the ball screws as you climb mill without worry but you have to lock the axis that is not to be moving. The head on this one does not nod either. I suppose the plus of that is not ever having to tram the head.

    All this is based on machining being your hobby and not your bread and butter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    well, as to 4), it will take a lot of time, and some money to make this thing what its not.

    if you just want a decent manual BP type device, I'd say scrap it NOW, and move on.

    if you have lots of time, and want a real project, and you want a cobbled up quasi-cnc, go for it!

    if you happen to want a Tree analog tracer mill, well, for shits sake, are you in luck!
    And I actually already have “½ decent” Chinese ? No brand (painted to much no plates ) manual BP type device .

    ...When I saw this thing it’s sheer size and mass was so impressive , a real sturdy machine , making BP type mill look like a drill press



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    Read this older thread comparing tree to bridgeport:
    Which mill, Bport or Tree?

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    Here is another:
    Any Tree mill experts on the board?
    Do a search, probably many more helpful threads, this one is pretty good, has dos and donts with machine and parts sources.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Dont go for a bridgeport, Look for a tree that is compatable with this one.
    Maybe with a bad head motor or worn out head. Transfer this one over and you might get a decent machine for little money, IF you can find the right tree.
    Good thing about the tree is no drawbar. You can use it under a low ceiling.
    I still kick myself for not jumping on one fast enough that was right near me, some years ago....
    edit:
    Handcranks on existing machine sounds great if you can do it!
    I did actually read that exact post while I was trying to find info on this tracer mill .

    I actually already have an “Bridgeport style“ vertical mill ( chinese ? No name , too much paint and no name plates)

    ... I only got this thing because it was about to go to the scrap yard . Today ! .... but man like you and the other post said this things girth and size is just plain impressive . But if this mill doesn’t work out I wasn’t “really” looking for another mill . Even though having power feed everything would be amazing .


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