What temp. does wood ignite?
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Sterling,VA
    Posts
    257
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    57

    Default What temp. does wood ignite?

    I am trying to heat some drift wood to kill any bugs. HOW LONG and at WHAT TEMP do I need to let the wood sit to kill off any bugs? I am thinking of using a salamander heater, blowing into a container. I am trying to clean about a pick up truck load. What will work????
    Thanks for the help!
    Cory

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    5,620
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    262
    Likes (Received)
    1846

    Default

    Hmmm ...

    Wood is a pretty good insulator, plus driftwood is likely pretty moist. You can get the outside hot enough to kill the beasties, but if you've got thick sections, you're unlikely to get the inside hot enough. That much heat will also wreak havoc on the wood, causing it to crack unpredictably.

    You might look into a fuming treatment instead. Find out what the pros use for whole-house fuming, and pump your container full of that. Try not to kill yourself BTW .

    Regards.

    Finegrain

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Leinster, Ireland
    Posts
    1,205
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    44
    Likes (Received)
    53

    Default

    Just over 400F for it to catch fire. a little over boiling point shouldn't hurt it so long as their is plenty steam in the atmosphere to stopit shrinking and cracking

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Sagle Idaho
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    clear plastic bag sealed well, in direct sunlight for 30 days, or ..... Raid it. or cook it in micro wave. freezing only slows em down.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Bermuda
    Posts
    271
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default

    Why not use steam?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    45
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Wood reaches it's "Auto Ignition" point at around 300 C.(570 F). That is the minimum temp at which the gas/vapors given off from the heated wood will self ignite without a spark or flame present.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    217
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    farenheit 451. its the name of a book too.


    I believe that 140 degrees is the mininum temperature for killing bugs. international packages that are made from wood are required to have the bug killing treatment, so try google.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    San Antonio, Tex.
    Posts
    426
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    This brings back memories of a dinner party my wife and I had at our home for some of her friends from Mexico. I put two very large logs on the well-established fire in the living room fireplace - it was cold outside. After eating for about 1-1/2 hours, we adjourned to the living room. After another hour there, about 7 or 8 large black bumblebees flew lazily out of the front log! The log had been in the blazing fire for almost three hours! They cleared the room quickly! A couple of swats with a tennis racquet restored order.

    The answer to your question depends on the diameter of the log. Our logs were about 15" diameter. I would say that five hours at elevated temperature (150*F) should do the trick for a log that fat.

    A.T.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    4,028
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13
    Likes (Received)
    50

    Default

    I was taught that wood ignites at different temps according to type, moisture content, etc. The ignition temp. of wood decreases the longer its near heat, like in a prefab fireplace structure.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    31,816
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    large black bumblebees
    Maybe. Carpenter bees are great "deep hole drillers". Around here they like any kind of soft wood.

    John

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    10,718
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    41
    Likes (Received)
    4424

    Default

    There's many ways to fet rid of bugs. In lumber it's simple but laborious.

    Place a couple of 4 x 4's on a good surface and level them to get them in a plane. Place a large sheet of poly on the skids. Restack the lumber separated by stickers on on the poly sheet. Arrange a couple of baffles so air blowing through the stack is directed through a zig zag. Wrap up the poly so it's tightly sealed.

    If you use the fumigation method place the stack so when you uncover it, it can air out for several days. An out of the way place in a carport will do fine. Any nasty solvent will work as a fumigant for bugs. I prefer lacquer thinner but it will stain some lumber a little. Just before you close the tarp, sprinkle on about a quart of lacquer thinner before you seal up the stack. Leave it for a couple of weeks or a month. This can't be hurried. The lacquer thinner has to diffuse through the stack over time. The bugs have to breathe and lacquer thinner is tocxic. Refresh the thinner a couple of times just to be sure there are fumes to kill the bugs. Listen for their tiny screams and sounds of choking and rejoice. My advice is to leave the material sealed up until you wish to draw from it.

    If you use the heat method, black plastic in the full summer sun will work fine. Just to be sure, locate the stack where the sun can get at one side and the top the full day. Insulate the stack where the sun can't get at it. Add or demove insulation on the exposed sides according to sun availability to maximize heat gain during exposure and loss at night. Have a tarp handy if it rains.

    Alternatively use heat from a modified milk house heater and a temperature controller like this: http://cgi.ebay.com/PID-Temperature-...QQcmdZViewItem It comes with a thermocouple and has ramp to hear and cool, set temperature. It's a real smart little gadger perfect for controlling a lumber kiln.

    Insulation is the key to this method. Use 4" or 6" batt insulation and leave no gaps. Cover with plastic to minimize air exchange. You'll have to work out baffling and sticker arrangement for good air flow. I suggest ramp to 150 degrees over 12 hours and hold for a week. Then just turn it off. This methnd works well and doesn't affect the moisture content of the lumber since its sealed and insulated.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Golden Valley, NC
    Posts
    430
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Why not use Methyl Bromide? It comes in small 12oz. cans about like freon. To use, you make a pucturing device, by taking a can the M-B can will fit in, about the size peas come in, cut a piece of 1" wood board to fit in the bottom, and drive a 1-1/2" roofing nail through the board, and place the board in nail pointing up.
    You wrap the pile of wood in a large sheet of plastic, folding over the edges, and weighting them down, and before sealing the final edge, you place the can of M-B upside down in the peas can, place it inside, and seal the final opening. Pressing down on the M-B can through the plastic, will puncture it. Give it several hours to work, waiting 'till the next day is better. Make sure you're UPWIND when you open the plastic. Methyl Bromide is available for about $2-$3 a can at farm supply stores. It's used to fumigate soil, tractors, grain, and lumber. If they want you to be certified, a visit to your county extension agent will get you certified.
    Paul

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    8,346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1578

    Default

    Ray Bradberry farient 451 is for paper so that should be close to wood. I have read that wood used to build solar collectors dries out over years in the sun and can ignite at 200 F?
    Bill D.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    187
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    14

    Talking Ignition of wood

    Cool, a PM topic I have some actual expertise in :-)

    I did my thesis in part on this very subject, and it involved cooking up lots of wood samples, and the answer is - it depends :-). If you have problems sleeping, it is http://digital-library.canterbury.ac...smd=1&awdid=1#
    It is a function of time to ignition (how long you want to cook it for), density, moisture content and piloted or unpiloted ignition (pilot flame or sparks, how big and what type) and test method. Particle board and MDF makes a difference as well, due to the glue content, although it is a lot more
    Vyventis Babarauskas published a nice summary of research on the subject (IGNITION OF WOOD, A REVIEW OF THE STATE OF THE ART, Interflam 2001 - I can email it if you wantum). The range was between 210-497 degrees C, mostly around 350 deg. It is possible (although unlikely) to get ignition at lower temperatures - there have been cases where wood in contact with steam pipes for a long, long time (like years) has ignited. If you need more info, let me know and I will dig out my copy of the the Ignition Handbook and other articles.
    Most tests involve the heating of the sample for around 20 mins maximum, and ignition at very long heating times is a very chancy thing with huge variation in times, or if it ignites at all. The charring of the surface has a huge effect as well as it both insulates the wood underneath and has different properties as it has few volatile substances left in it.

    Probably more than you wanted to know...

    Geoff
    Last edited by Geoffm; 05-10-2008 at 12:48 AM. Reason: Can't spell...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    99
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    18
    Likes (Received)
    10

    Default

    I used to work for Lockheed. The nose fairing on the Polaris sub launched ICBM was made from 9 layers of laminated sitka spruce. Like Geoffm says, The charred outer layers insulated the inner layers very effectively.

    Ken


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •