whats a good tap set?
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  1. #1
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    Default whats a good tap set?

    Im looking to buy a reasonably priced set of metric taps. I do have a lathe and milling machine so i will be doing some power taping. But there are so many brands I just don't know what ones are any good. Also not looking to spend a lot but don't what cheap ones i can't use either. Suggestions?

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    Skip a set, buy good taps in the sizes you need as you need them.

    However, I just remembered these- https://www.travers.com/18-piece-sup...listname=SITE>

    That may fit your needs.

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    The GearWrench tap and die sets are about as good as it gets for a cheap starter set. As Cole suggests, you'll want to substitute better taps (spiral etc.) and dies as needed, especially for repeat jobs.

    Best thing about the set are the adjustable ratcheting tap and die holders. These, alone, are worth the price of admission. The tap wrenches are easily spring-loaded or extended. The case is decent enough to keep things together.

    https://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-38...gateway&sr=8-3

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    +1 on buying taps as you need them. Sets usually are not of the same quality as a tap purchased from a proper supply house. Be sure to spec GH(1,2,or 3) after the thread call out, as in 1/4-20 GH2. the number tells you how far above basic size the tap is ground, in increments of 0.0005.

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    The "GearWrench" set!!

    Carbon steel taps and dies in a funky fat, blow molded suitcase...yikes! Good for a low end cobble shop I suppose.

    Stuart

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    The "GearWrench" set!!

    Carbon steel taps and dies in a funky fat, blow molded suitcase...yikes! Good for a low end cobble shop I suppose.

    Stuart
    Pretty much my take too. If they come in sets they're not likely to be very good. Just seems to be the nature of
    the beast. Buy them individually as you need them. If you look around you'll see that virtually none of the "good"
    brands sell them in sets.

    Nachi is my preferred brand but there are many others. Butterfield, Clarkson Osborn, YG, Dormer, Morse, OSG,
    Hanson Whitney to name some. Regal is an American made brand that I've never used but I've heard good
    things about.

    If you want to learn more about taps you'll find a few pages of good information in the Travers Tool catalogue...

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    The "GearWrench" set!!

    Carbon steel taps and dies in a funky fat, blow molded suitcase...yikes! Good for a low end cobble shop I suppose.

    Stuart
    Beat me to it....

    But Navy Chiefs always did cheat.

    They had a hand in creation of the US Marine Corps to handle the niceties of polite manners, political correctness, and ever-so VERY gentle delivery of bad news ....so the Navy could save time and just "tell it like it is", 16"-50, Mark 48 ADCAP, SLBM.. or keyboard.



    "Metric" That's a European thing, right?

    Search on:

    "Brüder Mannesmann".

    "Drilbox GmbH, Schillingfürst"

    "BGS Technic"

    Yeah. The prices are higher. Just guess. And keep in mind that these linked ARE the "basic, entry" or garage-mechanic grades.

    Manually applied, infrequent use. AND NOT CNC machine "production" goods slamming out one on-size part after another, hour after hour, day after day. Which are NOT sold in "sets" anyway.

    Just ones that have better value for money and will last a fair while vs the drawer-space-fillers and "decorators".

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    Used to be said that buying cheap, consumer grade tap & die sets , drill sets et al basically got you a nice box and a one time use identification tester for the sizes you actually need. Saves wasting money on what you will never want I guess.

    As previous posters have said look for HSS with split dies. Over here MSC offerings from Lyndon don't seem too bad but are up in the £300 region. Which is the sort of money you will need to spend. Dormer list at over £1,000 for a metric set.

    Again over here haunting E-Bay will find good brand single or 3 sets brand new at, probably, lower total cost. Do you need another set of "crappy to OK I s'pose" quality die stocks and tap wrenches? Do you need all three taps in each size? Will a single spiral or machine tap do for your work?

    Clive

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    Mostly agree with others saying to buy separate taps.

    But usable good quality sets exists too, just need to know where you look. Guhring or Dormer comes to my mind right away as they are commonly used around here

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dormer-L114.../dp/B01NASU3XK
    Gewindebohrersatze - Gewinden

    Someone might be able to point to right direction where to buy Guhring in US.
    If you are penny-pinching its worth checking how much the taps cost as separate items, pricing is not always consistent and sometimes the sets are actually more expensive way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clive603 View Post
    Dormer list at over £1,000 for a metric set.

    Again over here haunting E-Bay will find good brand single or 3 sets brand new at, probably, lower total cost.
    Yup. Some new, others remaindered off the leavings-behind of shuttered businesses and individual craftsmen - folks that thought they just HAD to have a "set". My only "sets" include two as have sat full fifty years being opened for use but once in several years, each for an oddball need. Usually only "chasing" to clean-up, even so, as I don't design-in the oddballs, new work, anyway. Few do.

    Meanwhile fit-for-the purpose taps-mostly, dies only ever' now and then, have quick-stepped through the "loose" tool drawers the whole time.

    Ones that fit the far fewer sizes and pitches I actually USE.

    2CW US, Metric.... and even a few BA... if they haven't rotted from lack of use..


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    Well, might get flak for this, but if you are looking to buy a set (ass-u-me and all..) you might as well go to Lowes/Home Depot/Harbor Freight and look around. You'll find if you need a tap to last and perform well you need to buy a good brand like Guhring, OSG, Emuge, etc.

    BTW, IMO - Emuge make some of the best taps, but you will damn well pay for it! OSG and Guhring make great taps for the price (relatively speaking). Some time ago we had a job with parts that got 16-20 or so 3/8-16 tapped holes in 4140ph. Last count I had on a Guhring tap was over 600 holes. Also worth a mention, Guhring (probably most tap makers) make specific coatings and grinds for different mat's. So if you are always tapping 1018crs, look for something for mild steel, and don't overspend on a tap made for ss for example.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sundown57 View Post
    Im looking to buy a reasonably priced set of metric taps. I do have a lathe and milling machine so i will be doing some power taping. But there are so many brands I just don't know what ones are any good. Also not looking to spend a lot but don't what cheap ones i can't use either. Suggestions?
    Taps in sets are rarely good quality. As suggested already in post #2 buy as you need them and you can buy the type and quality you want. The ones you'll use most often then best to buy at least 2. Murphy was a wise man.

    For metric maybe even a good idea to look at European suppliers.

    I don't know this company but might give you ideas.
    Gewindewerkzeuge |
    vhf-Shop


    If you start with a set and it isn't what you'd hoped you've just wasted money.

    Some seem to overlook the fact that you're looking for metric

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    I’d buy (I have) these in the 10 or so most used sizes. They are excellent products and not too costly. Some of their distributors may offer assorted sets as well if that seems more useful to you.

    Metric TiN Straight Flute Set | Viking Drill

    Their drills are really nice too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by henrya View Post
    I’d buy (I have) these in the 10 or so most used sizes. They are excellent products and not too costly. Some of their distributors may offer assorted sets as well if that seems more useful to you.

    Metric TiN Straight Flute Set | Viking Drill

    Their drills are really nice too.
    Good stuff. See also:

    About us - Twist Drill, A Division of Minnesota Twist Drill >> Tools with the power to perform.

    If you can stand the thought of buying stuff some thinkle peep ain't even made in America that actually still IS, oh ye of little faith.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    The GearWrench tap and die sets are about as good as it gets for a cheap starter set. As Cole suggests, you'll want to substitute better taps (spiral etc.) and dies as needed, especially for repeat jobs.

    Best thing about the set are the adjustable ratcheting tap and die holders. These, alone, are worth the price of admission. The tap wrenches are easily spring-loaded or extended. The case is decent enough to keep things together.

    https://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-38...gateway&sr=8-3
    And if you're going to buy carbon steel taps, go ahead and buy a set of EZ outs. And since you're going to buy EZ outs, buy an EDM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    Pretty much my take too. If they come in sets they're not likely to be very good. Just seems to be the nature of
    the beast. Buy them individually as you need them. If you look around you'll see that virtually none of the "good"
    brands sell them in sets.

    Nachi is my preferred brand but there are many others. Butterfield, Clarkson Osborn, YG, Dormer, Morse, OSG,
    Hanson Whitney to name some. Regal is an American made brand that I've never used but I've heard good
    things about.


    If you want to learn more about taps you'll find a few pages of good information in the Travers Tool catalogue...
    I bought a drill from McMaster and Regal is what arrived. It cut very well and was reasonably priced. If their taps are as good I'd certainly not scoff at them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sundown57 View Post
    Im looking to buy a reasonably priced set of metric taps. I do have a lathe and milling machine so i will be doing some power taping. But there are so many brands I just don't know what ones are any good. Also not looking to spend a lot but don't what cheap ones i can't use either. Suggestions?
    Since it appears that you are new to power tapping, I wouldn't get anything special.
    Go to MSC and buy some Hertel taps to practice with. Then once you snap those off and get the hang of power tapping you can buy the good stuff that has the right coating and # of flutes for your application.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sundown57 View Post
    Im looking to buy a reasonably priced set of metric taps. I do have a lathe and milling machine so i will be doing some power taping. But there are so many brands I just don't know what ones are any good. Also not looking to spend a lot but don't what cheap ones i can't use either. Suggestions?
    The carbon steel taps and dies are good for reforming threads. Mostly in soft materials and thin metal.

    The thickness of material will dictate how easy the tap can be removed after it breaks. Say you break a tap in a blind hole. You hunt around for a shop that can EDM the tap out. They tell you to come back in a hour. During that time you think about why you used such a cheap ass tap and wish you got a high performance tap instead.

    I am also in favor of buying the good stuff as you go.
    Last edited by rons; 08-12-2019 at 01:36 PM.


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