Who has a New Bridgeport series 1, how do you like it? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    We had one that I'm guessing was made 2016 or so at the last place I worked. Other than the paint being a bit nicer I didn't notice anything functionally different than mine that was made early 90's. Well, the paint isn't all chipped up pet. There were a few surfaces (top of the table comes to mind) that were flaked to give the traditional look but clearly it was just flaked over the top of whatever machining process they had used, not scraped first. Wasn't really an issue in any way though.

    They bought it without giving it much thought, but those I know who have given it more thought tend to strongly recommend considering Lagun. The one person I personally knew with a Wells loved it, but for whatever reason I don't see them all that often.

    You might be the first person I've met who has (I'm assuming) used a DRO and is willing to go back to counting turns on a dial.

    Handy as you've proven at moving machines I'm surprised you're looking at a new one. You can get one in great condition for substantially less than the cost of a new one without any patience, and for even less if you're willing to look around and wait a bit.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerholz View Post
    Here's one on Dallas craigslist. It's not new, but it does have a fresh Krylon overhaul and a nicely messed up table.

    Index Milling machine - tools - by owner - sale

    Pictures for posterity.



    Sent from my Nokia 7.1 using Tapatalk
    That is a 745 mill with a 645 head on it, with the old style power feed. I'm wondering if someone swapped out heads? Or did Wells-Index offer the old style head on a newer frame mill back then. I have a 645 mill, sure wish it had that horizontal spindle.... That's not too far from me neither, 350 miles distance. Is a little bit above my 2000 lb. limit.

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  5. #23
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    This is the crazy Bridgeport, series 2 special, little head-big body, just like Hollywood.
    https://storage.bhs.cloud.ovh.net/v1...n1Cypz78GD.jpg

    I get to use one of these arm stretchers sometimes, but they have double the weight capacity, they are a cult classic, and fetch high prices, but wow...

  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgrim3 View Post
    I looked at the pics again and I think I see what your saying. The 847 does look a little beefier
    Yeah, there's a lot more iron in the base and knee. This might show it a little better. Look at how the 747 flares in under the turret, and the 847 flares out. The bottom pic is my own 847, it's got a larger table than standard so it looks even more beefy. The 747 is more like a normal series 1 Bridgeport and the 847 is more like the Series 2 special donie posted.

    747:

    20210411_010513.jpg

    847:

    20210411_010944.jpg

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  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
    We had one that I'm guessing was made 2016 or so at the last place I worked. Other than the paint being a bit nicer I didn't notice anything functionally different than mine that was made early 90's. Well, the paint isn't all chipped up pet. There were a few surfaces (top of the table comes to mind) that were flaked to give the traditional look but clearly it was just flaked over the top of whatever machining process they had used, not scraped first. Wasn't really an issue in any way though.

    They bought it without giving it much thought, but those I know who have given it more thought tend to strongly recommend considering Lagun. The one person I personally knew with a Wells loved it, but for whatever reason I don't see them all that often.

    You might be the first person I've met who has (I'm assuming) used a DRO and is willing to go back to counting turns on a dial.

    Handy as you've proven at moving machines I'm surprised you're looking at a new one. You can get one in great condition for substantially less than the cost of a new one without any patience, and for even less if you're willing to look around and wait a bit.
    I find my self making silly little fixtures to do work on an angle fairly often, may be a hole, small counter bore etc. I have some parts that I could eliminate an op if I could run a shell mill across one side to get rid of the extruded corner radiuses off the corners of 1 side. I wouldn't hate the DRO and as mentioned I likely would use it sometimes if it were there, I asked for a price either way in an email to Wells yesterday. As for a used one, I am not opposed if I ran across a real nice one, however my relocation has me in a place a long ways away from machinery of any kind, I think I would rather pay for new than run all over 3 states looking at someone elses version of a near new machine only to find it to be another project. Tax wise I think I can stand some deduction, so a new shiny one may not cost much, Before moving I bought at least 2 years of anything I thought might be hard to get in the new digs including material. Aside from some aluminum, a half dozen endmills and a few countersinks the shop hasn't bought anything this year and we are well stocked for a couple of years to come. I would but a real nice used one, I just don't envision finding one within driving distance until after I buy a new one, I will look for a while but as mentioned above I would rather fix my motorcycle so I can ride it than work on a milling machine.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Yes you want a DRO! If you are buying new order it with one so they install it. You have an Indian to work on. that is much more productive than drilling and tapping about 50 holes in cast iron to install the DRO that you should have ordered when you bought it and don't forget the power drawbar, one of the big time savers in the manual mill world. Get a Servo feed for the knee as well.
    Good points, I asked Wells for a price and availability, though I will have to wait for the boys to make the building bigger before I can put one on the floor. If somehow the good deal shows up before that is done, I will find a place indoors to save it.

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by specfab View Post
    I would think that any machinist that is aware that the mill they are using has ballscrews would be able to make appropriate compensations in technique. Like, don't let go of the crank handle while climb milling (if the ballscrews can back-drive). The basic no-backlash characteristic of ballscrews can be a big advantage in a general sense.

    And like Moonlight Machine says, of course you want a DRO. That has to be the single biggest improvement in usability and productivity in the last 50 years of manual machining.

    My '87 Webb used to be CNC but I converted it back to manual. It came with ball screws. No problem at all with a heavy 50" table and two lock handles.

    Nice thing about ball screws is the low lash factor. 0 on Y and .007 on X. Hasn't changed in ten years.

    Definitely get a DRO. Then you can pretty much ignore the dials.

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  12. #28
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    .007” on a ballscrew Is a lot, are you sure it’s not the thrust bearings?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    .007” on a ballscrew Is a lot, are you sure it’s not the thrust bearings?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

    Actually it is the end play. It was tighter than that before I added a power feed on the X AXIS. The thrust bearing in that unit is supposed to control the lateral slop on the X ball screw but it's not that tight.

    In any case the clearance is negligible and I seldom look at the dials since I have a Mitutoyo KA DRO and it's very accurate.

    My friend has a Real BP with close to a full turn of backlash on the X axis. No worries since he uses a DRO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolznthings View Post
    Look at Acer, Kondia and Lagun. I have two Kondia mills. IMO way better than Bridgeport.

    1+ on the Kondia. Bought one new in 1978. Still using it daily Somewhat like a Timex.

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  17. #31
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    Definitely in the luxury category, but I’m surprised a power drawbar or knee hasn’t been mentioned more.

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    That Dallas Wells is an 860, or variant thereof.

    Yes, a DRO is a must and a power drawbar is a not-too-distant second. The power knee, not so much. That's because the knee is not moved nearly as often as X/Y and, like Y, it doesn't travel as far either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
    Definitely in the luxury category, but I’m surprised a power drawbar or knee hasn’t been mentioned more.
    Moonlight did mention these options, I put in for a quote either way

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    I have an 887 at home with all Servo feeds and a 747 at work. Other than the table size I think the coloums are the same, I'll have to check. We also have a Webb with box ways at work with the 10x50 table. That is another one you should check out.Eisen machinery is one dealer.I would take either one over a Bridgeport. One thing that I have noticed on the Wells is that the heads are extremly smooth and quiet. They also seem to have more flywheel in them. Maybe its just heavier pulleys but it seems cut smoother. I don't particularly like the brake on the Wells as much as the Webb.

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  22. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphonso View Post
    1+ on the Kondia. Bought one new in 1978. Still using it daily Somewhat like a Timex.
    Shop I used to work at had a Kondia, raise or lower the knee and your your X changes! It was machined and scraped on the piss! Yes, it was in tram.

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  24. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Shop I used to work at had a Kondia, raise or lower the knee and your your X changes! It was machined and scraped on the piss! Yes, it was in tram.
    I would prefer a machine that works correctly right out of the box, most of what I will use it for is pretty simple, I may find other uses over time.

    A shop I used to work at had 3 NOS Bridgeports, in wooden crates from the 70's along with 3 on the floor that we used every day, they all went to scrap s few years back, the only other I used was a Maxmill but it only made 10-24 holes in a tube with a tapmatic and a drilltap.

    The Webb says it is 100% Taiwan Made Machinery Since 1977, I would prefer to buy as domestic as I can.

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    In that case then definately check out the Wells you will like them. One other thing if you don't get a DRO (big mistake imho) Wells uses larger dials than any of the other mills. The only problem we have had with it is the speed control handle has to kept tight or the speed will increase by its self. It has been in constant use since the late 80's besides belts and one set of spindle bearings and just replaced the oiler that's been all the repairs.

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  27. #38
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    So, seems no one had bought a new one in the last few years.

    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    So, seems no one had bought a new one in the last few years.

    Dave
    I see that, however I am glad I asked as I was perhaps on the wrong track, hate to go down that road again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cgrim3 View Post
    For wells-index, anybody know what the difference is between the model 747 and model 847 manual mill?
    I was enlightened on this, the 747 is an American made head on a Tiawanees base made in the Bridgeport Tiawan factory.

    The 847 is Made in America, I have pricing on the 847 and options supposed to be here today, there is a 12 week lead time which is OK for me.

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