Who has a New Bridgeport series 1, how do you like it? - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    I called Kent USA and asked if USA meant anything, I was told they were in a meeting and would call me in an hour or less, nobody called.

    Wells has been very attentive, though they sent me a few pics today of rebuilt machines, I asked about rebuilt machines and was told oops, we sent the wrong pics, we will send more.

    I have a date to take a look at a near new Bridgeport/Hardinge pre import with a DRO, X servo feed, Y servo feed if I want it, I will be smarter Friday afternoon

    Purchasing has become a PITA in the last few years.

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    Well, there were a lot of good suggestions and though I agree the Wells Index looks like the best overall available as new, in the end I was put off by the price tag with no more than I plan to use it and the way in which I plan to use it, should that change I can still get one and more likely than not there will be an almost new on free to a good home a mile or so from here within a month.

    I ended up buying an almost new, older Hardinge/Bridgeport, one of the last all American made ones. I will post some pics after we get it upright and on the floor, it could use some cleanup but it sure in in nice shape. The guy I got it from was a machinery dealer winding down shop, and set it aside for himself then life changed so he sold it. It came from the factory with a DRO and an X servo power feed.
    img_1809.jpg

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  4. #63
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    I think for most uses there really isn't much between them. Having run Bridgys for ages, getting my Wells Index was a slight improvement but generally I could do everything I can do on the Wells on a Bridgeport.

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    A few pics
    img_1844.jpg
    img_1845.jpg
    img_1846.jpg
    img_1847.jpg
    img_1848.jpg

  7. #65
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    It came with a set of Hardinge collets that look as good as the machine
    Attachment 319181

  8. #66
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    Looks nicer than mine.

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    It is in a lot better shape than my old Maxmill, I feel certain it will do what I am looking for.

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    I called Hardinge to order the 3/8 R8 collet that was missing from my set and while I had them on the phone I asked them to date my machine, it was delivered to an Aerospace facility on 1-1-1978 ( that don't sound right, since Hardinge aquired Bridgeport in 04, I may have to try someone else), I called Newall for a manual on the DRO and they had it in their Historical manuals area for download, my last manual mill had travadials, anyone remember those?

  12. #69
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    Default Who has a New Bridgeport series 1, how do you like it?

    Hereís another vote for a 2-axis Prototrak. I canít imagine any more using a knee mill without the ability to interpolate holes, pocket, profile, power feed, rapid between positions, etc. A DRO is a tiny step up from dials, compared to the Prototrak control which is worlds better.

    The 2-axis machines still have a non f-ed up quill, which to me is better than having programmable Z.

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  14. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    I called Hardinge to order the 3/8 R8 collet that was missing from my set and while I had them on the phone I asked them to date my machine, it was delivered to an Aerospace facility on 1-1-1978 ( that don't sound right, since Hardinge aquired Bridgeport in 04, I may have to try someone else), I called Newall for a manual on the DRO and they had it in their Historical manuals area for download, my last manual mill had travadials, anyone remember those?

    Yeah, don't trust Hardinge to run serial numbers....
    The seller of a lathe that I bought last summer was said to be a 2003 - per Hardinge
    It is actually a 1993/1994.
    Same machine, but what was options in 1994 was std in 2003.
    Not quite the same machine ...


    --------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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  16. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    .... my last manual mill had travadials, anyone remember those?
    My 20 foot center to center lathe has one. Not real useful. Actually gets in the way of the tailstock crank.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alphonso View Post
    My 20 foot center to center lathe has one. Not real useful. Actually gets in the way of the tailstock crank.
    I think they are better on a mill. Had one on the carriage on a lathe and hated it. Hot chips landed directly on the plastic cover and you couldn't read it even if you wanted to. Indicator works better.

    Do you remember the ones that used an infrared light, had a kind of swirly pattern where you read it, accurate to tenths (so they said) ? Had a pair of those on a tool presetter, they were kind of neat.

    Nice Bridge, kustom. Looks super-clean.

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  19. #73
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    Some green/blue oil oozed out of the head just under the varispeed when I turned the head back upside up after 24 hours of upside down, is this the Lubriplate 107?
    img_1870.jpg

  20. #74
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    I think that is just extra Loctite.


    -------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    I wonder if itís oil separated out of old gear grease under the bull gear assembly? Mine was brownish, but who knows what color greases they have used over the years.
    Itís a Bridgeport, if it isnít leaking oil out the quill some oils wrong (no, really).

    If itís an older machine and has the Bijir oiler Iíd make sure oil drips from every port after a while. Probably not an issue given the low (no?) use, but old oil can thicken up.

  22. #76
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    Default Super nice used Bridgeport series I's

    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    What options did you get?
    What do you wish you had ordered?
    What do you not like?
    I am omly thinking at this time, but thinking I am. I do not need one but it sure would be handy now and again. I sold my old one 20 some odd years ago as I ran out of room and my helpers used it to stack shit on so it was a job to get near it if I did want it.
    Before buying a new mill , check out my new ones. I have some loaded with powerfeed and readouts and sound like new. (502)419-9170

  23. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I think that is just extra Loctite.


    -------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    Its oily, didn't run out until I put it upside up, half a tablespoon I would guess. I have it narowed down to 2008, locktight would have to have cured by now

  24. #78
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    I donít think thereís normally loctite anywhere in the head.
    There arenít all that many places or lubricants inside the head, but I wouldnít be inclined to worry about it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    Its oily, didn't run out until I put it upside up, half a tablespoon I would guess. I have it narowed down to 2008, locktight would have to have cured by now

    Loctite only cures in the absence of Oxygen* (or just air in general?)
    So if it was slopped in, it would stay liquid.

    There are green and blue Loctite's...



    * There is a $5 werd for that
    (Sumpthing like Aironaughticure I think?)
    (Possibly of German roots? Or maybe Polish?)

    ----------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Loctite only cures in the absence of Oxygen* (or just air in general?)
    So if it was slopped in, it would stay liquid.

    There are green and blue Loctite's...



    * There is a $5 werd for that
    (Sumpthing like Aironaughticure I think?)
    (Possibly of German roots? Or maybe Polish?)

    ----------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    I just randomly stumbled on this;

    Cyanoacrylates actively polymerize (in situ) from moisture being present in the air.

    I.e. the monomer (the liquid) polymerizes in the presence of water vapor (normal Relative Humidity) - i.e. the monomer blocks join together to link up and form larger polymer chains / macro molecules that are "solid" at room temperature. ~This is not the same as for example a solvent based system.

    _____________________________________

    Weird glue Off Topic anecdote : The British Museum (In London) used to glue a lot of it's ancient archeological glass together using UV curing cyanoacrylates, but then twenty years later found they all started falling apart due to de-polymerization from water moisture. So the same action that makes it 'Solid" also eventually un-does-it.

    They (The British Museum conservators/ restorers) then used the cyanoacrylate in tiny blobs at each end of a given joint of a shard and then would run in a low viscosity epoxy through the whole length of the joint by capillary action ~ The Epoxy being matched to the same refractive index of the glass [In some cases ] to create an invisible join. The cyanoacrylate is used to position the shard but the Epoxy seems to last much longer (mechanically) but even high grade Epoxies have their own "Issues" with yellowing , crosslinking and "Reversibility".


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