Why is the engineering department closed when the mechanics come to town?
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Country
    NICARAGUA
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    9

    Default Why is the engineering department closed when the mechanics come to town?

    Having been in the mechanic business for something like 38 years, and having been to more than a few factory tours and seminars, why is the engineering department always closed when the mechanics come to town?
    And why do we need a $40 smart switch, to control an $800 body control module, to turn on a dome light, when we have know from the days of Edison it only takes a switch ($3) and a few pieces of wire, to turn on a light bulb?
    And why do we have aluminum assemblies held together with steel bolts, when soaked with salt brine for ten years become one unrepairable piece of corrosion?
    Being this is a manufacturing forum, maybe someone can explain this to me.

  2. Likes Joe Miranda liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    311
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    78
    Likes (Received)
    104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PocoLoco View Post
    Having been in the mechanic business for something like 38 years, and having been to more than a few factory tours and seminars, why is the engineering department always closed when the mechanics come to town?
    And why do we need a $40 smart switch, to control an $800 body control module, to turn on a dome light, when we have know from the days of Edison it only takes a switch ($3) and a few pieces of wire, to turn on a light bulb?
    And why do we have aluminum assemblies held together with steel bolts, when soaked with salt brine for ten years become one unrepairable piece of corrosion?
    Being this is a manufacturing forum, maybe someone can explain this to me.
    Likely to avoid answering your questions. It's no secret there is often a disconnect between engineering and application. The larger the company the larger the disconnect.....or so I've seen

  4. Likes Pathogen, Joe Rogers, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  5. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Akron, OH
    Posts
    1,833
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    279
    Likes (Received)
    1376

    Default

    Because customers want the lights to turn on automatically with remote start, turn off automatically and not run the battery down.

    Maybe you want a user interface that looks like the cockpit of an old school 707, but most people don't.

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    600
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    827
    Likes (Received)
    347

    Default

    I am a retired auto tech with 40 plus years in the shop. My take is that the engineering department is closed down to prevent medical costs from the azz whipping the techs would give the engineers.
    I have come to understand , at least in the auto industry, that cars are engineered to produce not repair. Still if I ran the world, any engineer designing stuff would have to spend a year as a shop helper fixing the stuff he’ll end up designing.
    That way maybe one wouldn’t have to take the windshield out of a Camaro to replace the heater core...
    Joe

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    4,754
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2508
    Likes (Received)
    2308

    Default

    In the early 80's, due to a shortage of apprentices we conscripted some design engineers to read pressure gauges and manometers in power station steam turbine performance tests (a couple of years before we went completely over to transducers and data loggers). An infamous quote from a long serving design engineer was " I've been designing these turbines for 20 years and I never realised that they were SO LARGE".

    Says it all really.

  8. Likes JohnEvans, awake, mhajicek, HuFlungDung liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Beaumont, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,956
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    174
    Likes (Received)
    1514

    Default

    And the auto off saves $0.15 per month in the electric bill. It's green man, it's GREEN!



    Quote Originally Posted by Comatose View Post
    Because customers want the lights to turn on automatically with remote start, turn off automatically and not run the battery down.

    Maybe you want a user interface that looks like the cockpit of an old school 707, but most people don't.

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Country
    NICARAGUA
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    9

    Default

    The old school 707 cockpit may sell pretty well, given the retro trend thats been going on a couple of decades now.

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    58
    Likes (Received)
    122

    Default

    The pilots in those 737 MAX aircraft that went down probably wished they were sitting in 707 cockpit.

  12. Likes Joe Miranda, eKretz, mhajicek liked this post
  13. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,816
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Wow...qty (22) post's, and nothing but a rant.

    Try over at cartalk.com pulleeze.

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4,628
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4239
    Likes (Received)
    2795

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Comatose View Post
    Maybe you want a user interface that looks like the cockpit of an old school 707, but most people don't.
    Exactly, I wouldn't have a free hand to hold my beer because I'd be flipping switches constantly.

  15. Likes Booze Daily liked this post
  16. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    280
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    138
    Likes (Received)
    159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Rogers View Post
    I am a retired auto tech with 40 plus years in the shop. My take is that the engineering department is closed down to prevent medical costs from the azz whipping the techs would give the engineers.
    I have come to understand , at least in the auto industry, that cars are engineered to produce not repair. Still if I ran the world, any engineer designing stuff would have to spend a year as a shop helper fixing the stuff he’ll end up designing.
    That way maybe one wouldn’t have to take the windshield out of a Camaro to replace the heater core...
    Joe
    Added emphasis to highlight this point. As an engineer in the automotive sector (working on mechanical design of electrical components) it boggled my mind just how much effort went into making the parts easier to put together. Not better, or cheaper per se, but like legos that can only go together one way. Sometimes that wasn't even enough, if something like a box cover had to be held with the other hand during the process. At times it felt like we were engineering fuse boxes to the point that if it were simply thrown in the general direction of an engine compartment, it would be properly assembled. Of course, all bets are off once the rest of the bits find a home...

    As an engineer, it is also my opinion that only crummy engineers don't listen to technicians. Even if there is nothing that can be done about it per the above points regarding OEM stringent requirements for new assemblies, you'll know better for next time when there might just be something that CAN be done.

  17. Likes Joe Rogers liked this post
  18. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    123
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    134
    Likes (Received)
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    In the early 80's, due to a shortage of apprentices we conscripted some design engineers to read pressure gauges and manometers in power station steam turbine performance tests (a couple of years before we went completely over to transducers and data loggers). An infamous quote from a long serving design engineer was " I've been designing these turbines for 20 years and I never realised that they were SO LARGE".

    Says it all really.
    That is messed up. I can't imagine working that way. I was in the materials engineering divisions for a huge aerospace company. I had parts in my hands constantly. New designs, production issues, parts back from the field, etc. This was only a few years ago.

  19. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    24,299
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4447

    Default

    Heck the real question is why do those assholes build a car where you have to remove the
    WINDSHIELD WASHER RESERVOIR to change a headlight bulb?

    Or, why my car needs a bulb controller module to turn on the headlights and tail lights.
    See "switch and wires" you mentioned above.

  20. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    4,689
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    446
    Likes (Received)
    1069

    Default

    What about a mid 70's Oldsmobile or Cad where the published procedure was to cut a hole in the inner fender to replace a blower motor, and sheet metal and patch(tar...?) to close the wound?
    How about a Mustang where you had to partially remove the motor to change spark plugs? 428CJ
    How about a 60's Chrysler where you could break a hole in the tail shaft of the transmission, make the repair, and epoxy it back shut.

    Oh the good old days.

  21. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    4,754
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2508
    Likes (Received)
    2308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Or, why my car needs a bulb controller module to turn on the headlights and tail lights.
    See "switch and wires" you mentioned above.
    That may be a side effect of using CAN bus to control things, thereby vastly simplifying the wiring loom.

  22. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,816
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's not so much the "engineers", it's the bean counters that have tied their hands.

    You really are not seeing what goes on.

  23. Likes mhajicek, Joe Rogers liked this post
  24. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. George, Utah
    Posts
    849
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    381
    Likes (Received)
    538

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Wow...qty (22) post's, and nothing but a rant.

    Try over at cartalk.com pulleeze.

    Yeah, and 90% of yours are nothing but disparaging others. But hey, you've got the count up.

  25. Likes reggie_obe, g-coder05 liked this post
  26. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    24,299
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4447

    Default

    (bulb controller)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    That may be a side effect of using CAN bus to control things, thereby vastly simplifying the wiring loom.
    Not in a 2007 corolla!

  27. Likes Mark Rand, 4GSR liked this post
  28. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Victoria, Texas, USA
    Posts
    3,979
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2116
    Likes (Received)
    1002

    Default

    Keep the rant going.... Have a 2017 GMC Arcadia that the windshield wiper washer fluid pump has gone out. Right after the 15K factory warranty went out. Imagine that? To replace the $40 part, you have to remove the passenger side front wheel, remove the firewall cover to access the pump. An all day job for the home mechanic. Cannot even imagine what the dealer would charge to replace it.

    Back to the subject, I design things that are stuffed into a oilwell casing and are pushed down hole for up to two miles or more. It's all "hands on" from design stage to assembly to field run of the tools. Believe me, when the guys from the field call you up at 3 am, and say they have a problem, and a $15K/hour drilling/work over rig is idling, I am in the hot seat until the problem is resolved. When a customer comes into the door with a failed tool, we drop what we are doing and go check it out. Believe me, I've ruined many sets of "dress clothes" over the years getting my hands dirty. I lost my "virgin" ears many years ago, too!!!
    Ken

  29. Likes mhajicek, ronf, Joe Rogers liked this post
  30. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,816
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4GSR View Post
    Keep the rant going.... Have a 2017 GMC Arcadia that the windshield wiper washer fluid pump has gone out. Right after the 15K factory warranty went out. Imagine that? To replace the $40 part, you have to remove the passenger side front wheel, remove the firewall cover to access the pump. An all day job for the home mechanic. Cannot even imagine what the dealer would charge to replace it.

    Back to the subject, I design things that are stuffed into a oilwell casing and are pushed down hole for up to two miles or more. It's all "hands on" from design stage to assembly to field run of the tools. Believe me, when the guys from the field call you up at 3 am, and say they have a problem, and a $15K/hour drilling/work over rig is idling, I am in the hot seat until the problem is resolved. When a customer comes into the door with a failed tool, we drop what we are doing and go check it out. Believe me, I've ruined many sets of "dress clothes" over the years getting my hands dirty. I lost my "virgin" ears many years ago, too!!!
    Ken
    I'll bet your shop has a windsock out back for a bell jetranger….ugh

  31. Likes 4GSR liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •