Would you build a shop next to railroad - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Here is my friends shop. He does very little CNC though...but I will say that since he is right at the grade crossing when trains come through its really hard to hear on the phone.rr-shop.jpg

  2. #42
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    I wouldn't even consider it. Vibration and precision don't coexist well. Years ago I worked at a company that did in-house surface mount assembly with a sophisticated pick and place machine. All work had to be scheduled to avoid the other workers' break times because the vibration from the herd of workers going for coffee interfered with precision placement. The machine had all kinds of vibration damping but it couldn't handle that.

  3. #43
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    No, I wouldn't, worked next to a B&N main for years, cheaper to pay fines then slow down, then the local was going all the time.

    Machines were re-leveled 2-3 times a year.

    Current job at a mine, owns a 21 mile short-line the upper yard is right out side the door, 5-10 mph speed restrictions don't matter, add in ball-mills crushers etc with in 200 yards. Lucky to even hold any tolerance

  4. #44
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    I once officed where there was a rail line approx 50yd from the building and an active army ammunition depot within about 10mi.

    If you were real lucky, the train would go by as the army was detonating old ordnance.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lock View Post
    Google Maps

    I believe that this line is more of a staging area between the intermodal yard a couple miles down the line and the timber mills the other direction. Not sure but I believe it would be a slow line.
    Zooming out of that location, you are on the edge of train city. From the looks of that track it supplies the tank/refinery facilities down track. The trains may not be an issue with work performed but, the staging of cars may impact traffic around there.

    My shop is on the wrong side of all three RR's in town, all crossing are on grade with exceptions of bridges at the far west and east ends of town. The UP stages blade trains along the siding next to my shop along with tank trains once in a while. The K&O just up the street a block is constantly moving cars, particularly during harvest with grain trains and, they handle Cargill Salt hoppers as well. These moves are generally not issues for vibration although they can be, the bigger issue is they block traffic for up to a half hour at a time.

    Then there are the cowboy train drivers coupling cars, depending on where they are you can feel them and hear them. There is a siding just west of me that is a staging lane, sometimes you hear cracks like thunder or a massive explosion. These are the kind of events that would be unexpected and potentially a problem while running a machine. Picture a record player going crazy. Life along the tracks in a machine shop is doable, it takes a bit of adapting to your surroundings. If you are attentive you will pick up the cues pretty quickly.

    Steve

  6. #46
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    I went to work in a new shop with a friend. One Saturday morning I'm standing at the lathe turning a part when there is an incredible loud sound and the whole building is shaking. It scared the hell out of me and I didn't know what I should do. I didn't know that the shop was right at the end, maybe 100 yards, from the end of a runway at McGuire Air Force base. It was air show weekend and the Blue Angels were practicing low level touch and goes on that runway!

  7. #47
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    Somebody I knew lived near a expressway in a housing development with fairly new and modern homes. You could hear the noise from the road. I asked does that
    not bother you? I said that at night the sound is like the ocean waves breaking on a beach.

    The train will make lots of noise and might have different lengths of cars each time. The condition and age of the tracks and bed will determine how much vibration
    is transmitted to your building. I have stood outside in a parking lot next to a commuter train with no noticeable vibration. Just sounds like a swoosh.

  8. #48
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    At the local steelworks I work in, I was in the hot strip mill machine shop/roll shop, i used to work in bearing chock maintenance but would occasionally grind a pair of pinch rolls for the mill on this big old Farrel Roll Grinder, talking 1800mm max roll diameter x 8 meter centres. The diesel loco's used to go up and down outside the roll shop carrying hundreds of tons of hot rolled coil. I never noticed any issues with the trains going past, and this old farrel could grind a 1700mm roll barrel parallel within a thou without much effort aligning your steadies.

    Now, the automated roll loading crane was a different story. They automated the 15 ton crane over the CNC Grinders using laser positioning. The shop,some 360 feet long, being built on reclaimed mud flats, would move and twist during the day, resulting in the lasers going out of line with the recieivers, and consequently the crane forgetting where it was. Think of 10 ton roll assemblies being carried over your cabin while you are blissfully unaware.

    The CNC grinders installed in 1988, had considerable foundations installed to provide a long and stable life as these grinders work 24/7/365 on shiftwork. When they were drilling for the pylons, they said they drilled through the reclaimed and compacted dirt done by the original mill builders in 1952/1953 and into the softer mud below. They would add 6 meter lengths of universal column, weld them together end to end, and then bang it down into the hole using a pile driver. They said they stacked up a concerning amount of beams until they hit bedrock. Some guys talked of 180 meters of beams going down until they hit rock, but I don't know how true that figure is.

    The old boys still grinding rolls on the remaining manual roll grinders said the bloody pile driver did much worse for roll accuracy and finish during 1988 than the shop built on a swamp, or passing locomotives have done in the 30 years since


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