Would you buy a Machine from the Flood in Texas ? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    With CNCs where most of the sensitive electronics are up and out of the way, I wouldn't right it off as a bad option.

    Depending on how high the table sits on something like a mill, it may receive minimal water damage. If the table on a VMC was fully submerged for a long time in very saline water, then there's a chance it really had time to work it's way into the bearings, bushings, motor housing, etc. With common old machines, it might not be all that big or expensive of a job to replace, but it better factor into the cost of the machine.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    I wouldn't knowingly buy a flooded machine (unless I could be sure how high the water got on the machine and the nature of the machine) but I did once buy a Sodick sinker EDM that I discovered later was under water about halfway up the electronics box ! The way I knew this was I heard about it after the auction, then noticed the water line on the walls about 4 feet up, plus there was dirt in the electronics left behind by the receded water.

    Amazingly the machine worked fine however......even CNC electronics can be under water as long as the power is completely off and everything dries out completely before you turn it back on.(presuming no minerals or refuse left behind that might short out something....would actually have been better if the Sodick electronics had been sprayed with fresh water from garden hose after the flood)

    Worse actually is an automatic powder type fire extinguisher getting into the electronics, where everything eventually corrodes from the powder if not cleaned like crazy afterwards.

    I did spend hours vacuuming up the dirt in that Sodick cabinet...luckly no fish bones in there.

    I do wonder what would have happened if the water got high enough to submerge the board with the battery for parameter backup...presume that would not have been good.
    What he said. Years back the street my shop was on flooded with 20 to 24 inches of water. Fortunately my shop did not flood. Unfortunately my friends shop on the lower end of the street did. After the flood we spent weeks washing mud and crap out of the 4 cnc machines he had. Blowers and heaters on low to dry things out. Servo's pulled off and cleaned then vacuum oven dried out. Electrical cabinets washed and blower dried with two we had to pull the boards to get the mud out. Two machines axis cables were replaced because they had cracks in the insulation (they were there before the flood) and we decide not to chance it.

    All but one fired right up with no problems, the forth blew a cap on the programmable coolant nozzle board. Replaced the capacitor and all was good. The big old American CNC lathe he had even ran better as a chronic unsolved problem with it went away.

    But like I said... most of his machines were only in 20 to 24 inches of water. I think he was very lucky and we made up a game plan for each machine then stuck to it...not rushing.

    His insurance company had him covered for flood! Send an adjuster over who wrote him a nice big check. He bought the machines back from them for scrap rate. Paid me my shop rate to help him for those two weeks fixing them.

  3. #43
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    Glad I'm not needing the advice here! Been a long nerve wracking road but it looks like for us the rain is over. Sun is out and wind is blowing. We ended up with 28" last I checked but out here in the woods it soaks in and runs off pretty well. The little creek that splits my property went over its banks by a good bit when the rain really picked up, but within a few hrs as the rain got back to a "normal" pace it went back down. Unfortunately quite a few guys I know were flooded out.

  4. #44
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    Yes I would buy one if the price was right.
    But my normal method on any used machine tool is to tear it down to nothing, rework/replace mechanical as needed.
    Paint while in a thousand pieces and totally gut and replace the electrics and electronics.
    I do leave wiring if the wires look good. In this case I'd toss the terminal strips.

    Big labor time involved here but you can hire young ones with basic mechanical skills who want to learn how to build a cnc machine tool for not so much per hour.
    Even at a more decent pay rate much to be said for a operator/machinist that knows every single piece in his/her machine when they helped to build it from the ground up and knows which wires do what, how to crimp/solder.
    Now they can pull an encoder, change it, reset the grid shifts and even resolution if need be.
    Doing so you grow your own in-house skilled trades from machine operators which pays in spades.

    Plus side you know this machine mechanical, wiring and controls as your own and will never need a service guy to keep it running.
    Minus side your first few machines down this path involve a lot of learning and will cost more than buying working or new stuff or going outside for a full rebuild.

    I would never try to dry out the electrics or boards. One needs a machine that runs 24/7 and this is a maybe at best.
    Bob

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  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by pgmrmike View Post
    Glad I'm not needing the advice here! Been a long nerve wracking road but it looks like for us the rain is over. Sun is out and wind is blowing. We ended up with 28" last I checked but out here in the woods it soaks in and runs off pretty well. The little creek that splits my property went over its banks by a good bit when the rain really picked up, but within a few hrs as the rain got back to a "normal" pace it went back down. Unfortunately quite a few guys I know were flooded out.
    Good to hear!

    I've got a customer near you, on the north side of 302, and a creek goes through his property also, is it the same one that runs through your property? His main driveway goes across a bridge and he has a gate there to keep the horses away from his house. Twice last year I had to replace the opener because the creek flooded. Last time I put the control box up 7 feet high, and that saved it. Can't do anything about the arm as I raised it as high as possible, will always have a repeat customer

    You need to come visit.......

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  8. #46
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    Just got an email from FANUC, it has a link to what to do with flood damaged electronics as well as an help number:
    "Please contact us toll free at 1-888-326-8287 prompt 2, 2 if you need assistance."
    If you are in that situation you can use all the help you can get.
    Anyone heard how Gates Machine Tool Repair in Manvel faired? I have a Hardinge spindle there being rebuilt and have not been able to make contact with them.

  9. #47
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    I've been watching this guys videos on electronic board repair. I have no idea why I'm wasting so much time on it but it is captivating watching and learning how to track problems down.

    This guy's main business is repairing MAC motherboards that have been damaged by liquids. Here is one of his videos about drying out boards and why it's experience that it is not a good idea. Says there is too many areas that you can't clean under the chips and corrosion soon sets in. Says ultrasonic cleaning is the only way to go..

    This video shows a board that was dryed out and what happens to them if cleaning is not performed properly.

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  11. #48
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    This picture was sent to me by the guy that did the land clearing and dirt work for my building.

    It turns over, but the computer got fried so dosent run. Hes working on getting it fixed, iron is probably fine, but the electrics really took a hit. Cab was about half full of water at highest level.


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