Mitutoyo's history of the gage block.
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    Default Mitutoyo's history of the gage block.

    http://www.mitutoyo.com/wp-content/u...Gage-Block.pdf
    The Master of Measurement – Carl E. Johansson

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    Thank you for making this very interesting history available. I noticed they use "gauge" rather than "gage" for the spelling.

    I need to remember to check Greatest Hits and Links" more often.

    David

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    Quote Originally Posted by old_dave View Post
    Thank you for making this very interesting history available. I noticed they use "gauge" rather than "gage" for the spelling.
    That's because they're not illiterate, like Noah Webster was...

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    Quote Originally Posted by old_dave View Post
    Thank you for making this very interesting history available. I noticed they use "gauge" rather than "gage" for the spelling.

    I need to remember to check Greatest Hits and Links" more often.

    David
    .
    there was a documentary on the English language and how it has changed over the years. basically a average person from the USA if they time traveled to England 1000 years ago there is a 99% chance they would not be able to understand anything the English people were saying.

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    The question that was in the back of my mind here was how did U.S. english usage come to use the TWO spellings, "gage" and "gauge". "Gage" is used in my Brown & Sharpe, Starrett, Pratt & Whitney and Mitutoyo (U.S.A.) catalogues. These catalogues date from the early 1930's to the present. A quick look at my various U.S.A. machine shop texts shows they use "gage" also. My various books from Great Britain, mostly MAP publications, use "gauge". Thank you for bringing this to my attention, Mark. I think it's fair to say that in this country, outside the world of the machine shop, "gauge" is most commonly used.

    My 1960 edition of _Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary_ gives both spellings with "gauge" first. And it uses the spelling "gauge" in its illustration of several shop gages/gauges including the feeler, screw pitch, depth, and "go-not-go".

    David
    Last edited by old_dave; 10-20-2015 at 09:40 PM.


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