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  1. #21
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    The Lancaster was originally designed as the "Manchester" to use 2 of the Rolls-Royce Vulture engines Rolls-Royce Vulture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, which were essentially 4 peregrine cylinder blocks stuck together on a single crank case to give 24 cylinders in an X layout. The vulture saw limited action but was under developed (of 193 Manchesters in service, 30 were lost due to engine failures)Avro Manchester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia .

    Fitting 4 Merlins to a lengthened Manchester wing resulted in the outer two engine housings being out on the dihedral part of the wings, this looks slightly odd, but apparently performance with 4 Merlins was an improvement over 2 vultures of the same total horse power - a happy accident.

    Post war, the "Nene Lancastrian" used a civillianised Lancaster airframe with 2 nene jet engines and a pair of Merlin engines. It appears to have been more of a test bed than a "commercial" aircraft, though with the state / semi state BOAC the definition of the word "commercial" was somewhat stretched, and a "Commercial" flight to Paris is recorded.

    Apart from the iconic Hurricane, Spitfire and Lancaster and less romantic Halifax, the Merlin was fitted to the Mosquito fighter bomber, and in un armed condition this was also used as a "civil aircraft" on scheduled war time runs in and out of Sweden, bringing, among other things, nuclear physicists and ball bearings home. I think the later P51 could outpace a Mosquito, but none of the serving piston engined planes which the Axis powers started the War with could catch one.

    Post war, Air forces which were used ME / BF 109 variants, like Spain, eventually re-engined them with Merlins.

    The 1950s film "Battle of Britain" used the Spanish air force's ME109s and the high exhaust position from the upright merlin (or maybe even the Hispano which the Spanish used first) is clearly visible in some shots. Very different from the low exhausts from the inverted V of the original German Junkers Jumo 210 or 211 and DB 605 engines.

  2. #22
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    And another one about the mighty V-12's :



  3. #23
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    Graham White, author of Allied Aircraft Piston Engines and author of books about the Pratt & Whitney R-2800 & R-4360 engines, has a Merlin that I have seen him run at AEHS conferences. Quite a visual and sound experience.
    Merlin
    He also has a Continental 1V-1430 engine that he runs.

    B. Herzog

  4. #24
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    Grandpa was involved in the aircraft engine war effort. Dad was a Pratt & Whitney engineer during WWII. Actually dad was 1A with the draft board but his Pratt & Whitney job kept him Stateside.

    This clipping is Grandpa in '40.



    I had a boat load of P&W stuff I just gave away when I emigrated. Still have the original '39 magnesium case Continental A65 in my old airplane though.

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