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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    My dad had a military 98 with two German coins stuck in the firing pin take down ring holes of the stock..
    He got a pretty good price selling it..
    I remember a Gills sporting goods store that had 98s on a .. think they were $12 each..some were good with matching numbers.

    I sometimes hunt with a 98 06 that my dad had made.. and still have my old 8mm that i haven shot in many years.
    There was a period between the wars, when under the burden of the Treaty of Versailles, German Craftsmen would work for next to nothing. They were pioneers in the field of scoping rifles. In a sense this helped them in the short term. But in the long run their rifles were doomed to second rate desirability because of their craftsmanship.
    You see, they made excellent rifles with detachable scopes. And with the coming of WWII many of the scopes were separated from the rifles.
    After WWII Americans standardized industry to make scopes, rings and mounts that were very much interchangeable - but not for the German claw mount designs.
    If you get a chance to examine one of these rifles, note the quality of small shop craftsmanship in comparison to our standard of buy-at-Brownells-and-bolt-it-on craftsmanship.

    In 1958 my older brother bought an unissued SMLE Jungle Carbine (for $19.95) and then sporterized it. I still have it and should probably make some efforts to restore it.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt Learning View Post
    They were pioneers in the field of scoping rifles. In a sense this helped them in the short term. But in the long run their rifles were doomed to second rate desirability because of their craftsmanship.
    You see, they made excellent rifles with detachable scopes. And with the coming of WWII many of the scopes were separated from the rifles.
    After WWII Americans standardized industry to make scopes, rings and mounts that were very much interchangeable - but not for the German claw mount designs.
    Amongst Dad's initially 5 Mausers, once home from service, War two + "Occupation", one such DID have a claw-mount and the rather tiny scope made for it. Double "set" triggers, too. Lovely overall, the downside is that it used the earlier generation .318" bore rather than the later .323" bore.

    That mere .005" was at least "supposed to" render the later rounds unsafe to fire in the older barrel. We chose not to find out, so he traded it so as to not risk confusion with the others, all '98 military models.

    For scopes, we moved-on to ISTR a total of five installed mounts and three Balvar 8 quick-change scopes because the adjustments are in the mount, remain stable for each rifle, not in/on the tube as would require re-zero, each swap, if even one could swap at all. Not common, US market, end of the 1950's, dawn of the 1960's.

    Summer of 1961 Orren W Bellows handed that lever-gun to me. The $50, used Savage 99 oddly the best of the lot, for years still remained ahead of Dad's new Remington in 7mm Rem Magnum.

    If Old 99 can still put a full magazine, one-up through what looked like a single hole with a slight bump on it at our "family standard" for WBGVA/Western PA of 150 yard zero?

    Orren would have to be brought back to Earth to do it!

    Shot bag rest as he used off his own R&D "bench" as proved his thousand-yard legends, or no, I'm not that patient, let alone that good.

    One funny.. lent it to my then-boss who'd been invited to see after surplus deer, some wealthy Executive's ranch, down Texas way.

    Missed his deer, Day One.

    Our big Boss, USMC Gunny in a former life, took it, put a business card onto a tree, paced-off the hundred fifty yards he'd been told about, laid the whole mag into a quarter-sized hole, said "Buck fever, you dumb sonnovabitch!" (I did say former Gunny Sergeant?)

    Next day, Dave got his deer. One round.

    It hasn't missed one since. One shot, one broken neck, deer never knew he was hit, just dropped. None of the better meat spoilt, either.

    Some lever-guns are just more equal than others.

    Gunsmiths as well.

    Orren had fired it first, as-built.

    Then refused to alter it to .308 Win from .300 Savage as Dad thought wise to protect against obsolescence. Fifty-one years young, that year, Dad was, and HIS 1880's vintage Dad still lived off a .300 Savage turnbolt, last new when Coolidge was President.

    "NO ONE can possibly make it any better. You got lucky. It might be one in ten-thousand even of Savage's production. Best I can do can only make it worse."

    Whom, ever, dared argue that in an era when four if not all five of the nation's top five benchrest rifles said "Bellows action" and Orren hisself was behind one of them, more than just the one year, .220 "K" Swift.
    Last edited by thermite; 08-19-2019 at 08:54 AM.

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  4. #43
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    Beautiful stock work! This would be a rifle that anyone would be proud to own.


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