Best Gunsmithing Lathes.... - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 44
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Have any of you guys got your new Grizzly catalog.
    They have two new models of lathes made for
    gun smithing. They look to be real nice. I have a
    10EE and it is about useless for this type of work.

    Check them out and let me know what you think!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    suburbs of Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    Posts
    13,038
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    423
    Likes (Received)
    1014

    Post

    Interestingly, I found the Grizz lathes you were talking about...but the weblinks for both aren't operable yet!

    I was curious if they have different form and function than their other lathe offerings or if they are "hopped up" with additional tooling?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    The new Grizzly have higher quality bearings.
    The tail stock is suppose to be more accurate and can be torqued down to Zero
    The head stock is notched out on the back end of the spindle bore and comes from the factory with a build in spider. They have two models the professional
    16x40 with 2" spindle bore for $6750.00 and a beginner model 12x36 with 1 5/8 spindle bore for $2695.00. I really like the looks of the 16x40 looks real heavy duty and is big enough for most other jobs you may run across.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    alabama
    Posts
    93
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    I'm surprised that there was no mention of the 5900 and 6900 series Clausing lathes.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    peterborough,uk
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Paul
    the 10EE is a fabulous machine,I had one once,it was one of the best lathes I ever had.However,I'd choose something with a bigger spout through the headstock and slightly longer
    between centres. Although it seems that like me you appreciate the EE for what a fine machine it is rather than what use you can make of it. What about the next size up Monarch or a Hendey? I'm biased, I have an English Holbrook,its a fine machine but it only has a 1.25" spout, common failing with these lathes. I think you ought to be looking for a 6 or 6.5 " centre height, at least 30" between centres and a minimum 1.5" spindle bore. make sure you have a fixed steady rest with it as well.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    69
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Post

    You are on the right track, getting a lot of good input from knowedgable folks. Just remember, this is free advice and worth just what you paid for it! Here are my min specs for Gunsmithing Lathes: 10" min swing, 12-14" is better; 1.375 minimum hole thru hole in GEAR head spindle for 5-C collets; D1-4, L-0, or L-00 spindle nose, avoid threaded or A type; Minimum 24" between centers, 36-40" (1 meter) is better. Over 60" is too long, BUT may be a good value if bed can be cut down, but that's another story! This being said, a fairly recent 13" X 40" (metric) gear head tool room lathe, weighing about 2000 lbs is the most versatile and cost effective option. Most important are condition, condition, condition, and then tooling. After spending a year repairing and restoring my first lathe, had to spend much more on tooling! Basic tooling: 3 jaw chuck w/T&G top jaws, 4 jaw chuck, aloris wedge type(not piston) tool post with holders, full set of 5-C collets with lever or Sjogren type closer. Reducing sleeve for head stock center, live center, TS chucks, ... Taper attachment is nice but not really necesary. Personally, I don't think New Asian import lathes are not as good a value as a good, clean US or European lathe by known maker where parts and service are still available: Monarch, SB, Leblond, L&S, Hardinge, Clausing, Colchester... The challenge is finding and recognizing a good, clean, lathe at a fair price vs a "beater". However, They are available and sometimes very reasonably. I am a graduate industrial engineer with 30 years experience manufacturing all types of anti-friction bearings from 1" to over 6 foot diameter. I have done a lot of "hobby" gun work, and run my own machine shop. My current lathe (number 3) is a 1941 12 x 36 gear head Sebastian with 2 1/4 threaded spindle with all tooling listed, plus a 1J 9 X 42 Bridgeport. The Monarch EE is an exquisite machine. It gives the same kind of satisfation to some as shooting a hand built H&H, Griffin & Howe..., but I wouldn't hunt some of the places I do with a gun that's worth more than my car. I have seen phenomenal gun and model work done on machines that can barely be called a lathe. The bottom line is, buy what you can afford and use what you have.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Bob N wsa right. I learned how to thread and chamber a barrel on a 5913 Clausing, by an old retired toolmaker. Variable speed to 2000rpm, large enough thru hole for a barrel blank, short enough headstock to use a spider if that is desired. They won't take a heavy cut without chattering, but as has been said, heavy cuts aren't what you're after in a 'smithing lathe anyway.
    I just bought a 15X50 Colchester, primarily for gunsmithing. (rifle work mostly) I was lucky enough to find one that falls in your price range, had to look a long time though. Fella had it listed as a 15x40 and it didnt attract much attention. I never heard of a 15x40 model 8000 so a little investigation paid off.
    Good luck with your new aspirations.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Poetry Texas USA
    Posts
    1,754
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    293
    Likes (Received)
    205

    Post

    I use a 6913 Clausing. I have to use a cathead on both ends to do it through the head stock. It works great.
    Butch

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    I must have been asleep at the keyboard...my lathe is a model 2000.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NY-Long Island
    Posts
    36
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Delta/Rockwell 10" is the one I just acquired couple of months ago..I need to make a spider for it and I need to get a Quick Change Post..Just got a Steady Rest and also looking for a 4 jaw chuck.

    It is a through the head with Variable speed. Runs great..Now would a AXA tool post be the one or if I go Phase II do I go 100 or 200

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,203
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    334

    Post

    Probably the smallest one. I got the second largest for my 12" Logan and it was too big.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Post

    I've been using a Clausing 5914 for over ten years now and consider it ideal for gunsmithing. Varible speed drive is great for contouring barrels, can chamber through the headstock or with steady. Mine is 12 X 36, if I were doing shotgun work I would prefer a longer bed for screw in choke work.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Poetry Texas USA
    Posts
    1,754
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    293
    Likes (Received)
    205

    Post

    Good to see you on the forum Freddy. A great gunsmith and can help you guys alot.
    Butch

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    192
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Post

    There is a 12x36 Clausing advertised in my local paper for $1000. I have no idea of condition or tooling.

    Clemson

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Post

    Butch

    Most of the time I just lurk in the shadows, trying to learn something.

    Sure hated missing the swap meet at Shilen's. Elk hunting interfered. Priorities you know.

    Drop by sometime.

    Freddy Johle

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North(very) West(very) Ohio...near exit 13 on OH turnpike
    Posts
    3,680
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    180

    Post

    The grizzly 16" x "40 Gunsmith does seem pretty nice for the price....the smaller one isnt bad either at least looking at pictures .

    Bill

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    I just want to thank Jim for his post, 13 years later. I have never run a EE. Have seen plenty at actions though. Not to friendly for the home shop machinist. Big heavy machines with small capacity. Perfect for industry though. In my 30 years experience, there is no bench top lathe that equals a HLVH. From the factory I think I read they guarantee a max runout at .000025 or less and I think my zeros are in the right place. Next to a turning center, I know of no other machine that threads faster for a manual lathe. I have never run another lathe that the accuracy of the dials/leadscrew has lasted so long. No need for a readout on these babies. But they really only shine with the 5C collet. They amaze me especially after being put through operations by unqualified hacks that have no machining skills. I also do all the maintenance on my employers equipment. I believe with proper care the Hardinge HLVH will last a lifetime.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    so cal, usa
    Posts
    568
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    195
    Likes (Received)
    135

    Default

    Look at Webb or Cadillac lathes. Very nice machines, real accuracy too.Good spindle bore, be a great gun lathe. I use a Hwacheon, that's a Mori clone, it's a nice heavy lathe, not a real big spindle bore but I haven't been caught short yet.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,474
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    240

    Default



    Regarding the Monarch 10ee lathe I came up with a solution that worked for me, cant do a photo because of photobucket situation.

    I wanted to do a couple of simple operations on a Ruger 22lr barrel, shorten the chamber end around .050", and form a recessed crown.
    Here is what I did.
    The headstock being 24" long without the chuck, so a 17" barrel will be contained within the spindle.
    The minimum bore of a 10ee spindle is about 1.407", I made a plug of steel 1.406" diameter abot 3 1/2" Long. Cut grooves for Orings on the ends, to help stabilize this part when inserted into the spindle.
    On the ends of the plug, holes were machined to take pins that closely fit the bores.

    So, when I installed the barrel in the lathe, I installed the plug with the bore pin, to the end of the barrel, and pushed it and barrel back into the headstock, then used the 4 jaw chuck in the photo with lead pads on the jaws, to dial in the right end of the barrel using another pin in the bore.




    Well, not as precision as being able to dial an exposed left end of a barrel, but I would estimate the accuracy to be at least .002" using a plug with a pin to stabilize a barrel within a long headstock lathe like a EE. Its probably worth noting that the Monarch Spindle is very accurately made with regards to being concentric, as is Hardinge because of the high speeds.

    I wanted to tackle a difficult 22 rifle I owned "Ruger 77/22", the only photo I have is my first attempt of a recessed crown. What happened there was I wanted to try a 11 degree crown and a flat crown, so I quickly cut the 11 degree, then tried it, the rifle worked so good I didnt want to mess with it any further. photo-

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    9,885
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3337
    Likes (Received)
    3542

    Default

    My gunsmith who is in hos 60s uses an old 1236 Logan handed down from his dad who was also a gunsmith. Motor is so weak you give it a hand spin to get it started.
    I guess I would want a 1236 with a 2" through hole, metrics on the selection with not changing gears. Having a steady for sure and perhaps a taper attachment, with a 3jaw adjust true and a good 4jaw... likely good to have smaller chucks so not so heavy on and off.

    would likely make up a spider, even that back when I did a little gun-work I never had one.

    I used to hold/chuck the muzzle end and spin the action through a steady on an old 1248 Sheldon..don't know if many still do that. and having a 30" barrel a 48" lathe would be a good choice.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •