Best repair slide shotgun op rod
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  1. #1
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    Default Best repair slide shotgun op rod

    I'm not a gunsmith, and many of you probably know the best way to repair this.
    I believe it's a Montgomery Ward, but I'm still waiting for the model #. With that I can check with Jack First, but the one from a different model at Bob's was $87 something, again, holding for the model number.

    If that fails I plan on making a replica for the end, heat treat it and my friend, a professional welder, can either weld it to the original remaining op rod or silver solder it, and I suggested to do it on a bias per the drawing.
    The two photo's won't download, and JF says they don't have any parts for that model #
    20210414_191909.jpg
    OK, I got the model #, it's Western Field 6060-SB602-A

    My plan was to carefully clamp the O-1 end next to the original as per the sketch, then either silver solder or skip weld, clamped to an aluminum heat sink in either case.
    Also, if any of you know where else we could look for a replacement part we may avoid any weaknesses such a repair might add. The end away from the hook is screwed to the tube inside the wood slide handle, but the tube comes out of the wood part.
    Thanks
    parts

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    The hardness of the original op rod tests 50 Rc.

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    Age you sure on the model number?

    My cross reference chart lists an Wards SB620A as a Stevens 620A. A Wards SB60A is a Stevens 620.

    --
    Pat Jones
    Firestone CO

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    I wonder if the 0 and 2 were reversed. Running the #s as written showed this;
    Wards Western Field Model 60-Sb620-A 12ga Pump For Sale at GunAuction.com - 10988580
    Which looks a lot like what little I've seen. The op rod comes back from the Left side rear of the slide handle, so I may have envisioned it wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    The hardness of the original op rod tests 50 Rc.
    Really? Does the piece actually need that hardness?

    If not, or if it needs only the ends/wear points hardened, then I would TIG weld the two pieces together and be done with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wyop View Post
    Really? Does the piece actually need that hardness?

    If not, or if it needs only the ends/wear points hardened, then I would TIG weld the two pieces together and be done with it.
    My 2 cents worth...
    This and the earlier humpback version of the Stevens shotguns are my favorite, because the magazine takes down with the barrel. But unlike the Winchester M-12, it has a much sturdier mating of the barrel to the receiver.

    I may have a dozen or so pump shotguns, but the Stevens take down is my favorite go-to pump. Especially for defense/partridge with a 18 1/2" barrel, sling and small carry case.

    The first "operating handle bar" I repaired by cutting off the worn end and silver brazed to it a section of annealed flat file. Using stones to reduce thickness, and a Dremel tool to cut the notch and contour the hook, it still works perfectly, 45 years later.

    However, I concur that welding up the worn surfaces is a better solution if you have the equipment.

    And, I would consider harder is better. If the original hardness was adequate, the problem wouldn't be so common.

    And as a caution to prevent unnecessary wear to the hook on the operating handle bar, always lower the barrel/magazine assembly fully before disengaging the bar from the bolt.

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    If the original hardness was adequate, the problem wouldn't be so common.

    It may be that the original hardness was chosen so that wear occurred on the less expensive part. You certainly wouldn't want the wear to occur on the receiver.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGaskill View Post
    If the original hardness was adequate, the problem wouldn't be so common.

    It may be that the original hardness was chosen so that wear occurred on the less expensive part. You certainly wouldn't want the wear to occur on the receiver.
    ^^^ THIS ^^^

    Annnndd with "... have a dozen or so pump shotguns.."?

    Even a 'favourite' may have seen less wear in those 45 years than he who has but one or two will generate.

    "Two".. is all I bother with.. as primarily a handgunner.

    Pretty sure I haven't fired my Sauer & Sohn dreilling in full fifty years even ONCE?
    Still 8 X 57 JR deadly. But it had earned retirement.

    The Remington 1100 semi-auto is MY "go to" instead. Not exactly "failure-prone".

    That's why I have it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGaskill View Post
    If the original hardness was adequate, the problem wouldn't be so common.

    It may be that the original hardness was chosen so that wear occurred on the less expensive part. You certainly wouldn't want the wear to occur on the receiver.
    It may be. But it isn't.
    The wear comes from contact with a very hard bolt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite;3744692

    The Remington 1100 semi-auto is MY "go to" instead. Not exactly "failure-prone".

    [B
    have[/B] it.
    While the 1100 is indeed a very fine shotgun, it only takes the failure of a little neoprene o-ring to bring it to a screeching halt.
    I've replaced many for customers. More so than I've repaired Stevens M-60s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt Learning View Post
    While the 1100 is indeed a very fine shotgun, it only takes the failure of a little neoprene o-ring to bring it to a screeching halt.
    I've replaced many for customers. More so than I've repaired Stevens M-60s.
    Thanks, but..

    "The model 1100 holds the record for the most shells fired out of an autoloading shotgun without malfunction, cleaning or parts breakage with a record of over 24,000 rounds. The record was set in 1978 with a Remington model 1100 LT-20. Breaking this record has been attempted with several other models of Semi auto shotguns but has yet to be broken... "

    I think I can risk another 40 years of it. I even clean my one!
    Hopefully, with solvents as do NOT attack Neoprene?

    Even so.. Neoprene is NOT "fifty year" material.

    Happens I have been researching that very item for Aluminium roofing fastener washers. Silicon Rubber is NOT "perfect", either.. but IS the longevity king over Neoprene, Buna, Viton, EPDM, et al.

    So on your observation? Thanks, again! (why do I lurk here!!)

    My one is overdue for preventive maintenance replacement, age, not shells-fired count.

    After which? Who am I kidding?

    Not as if I HAD the forty years, meself, is it?


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    The wear comes from contact with a very hard bolt.

    I doubt you would want the wear to occur on the bolt, either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGaskill View Post
    The wear comes from contact with a very hard bolt.

    I doubt you would want the wear to occur on the bolt, either.
    EVERY firearm a HUMAN can LIFT has to make SOME compromises "somewhere".

    So we do the interchangeable parts thing ... and put a touch of inspection and preventive maintenance on our dance-card.

    T'was ever thus..

    Nothing lasts forever. Not even the Universe.
    Some things just last longer than others.
    Or are more idiot-resistant?

    I LIKE "idiot resistant"! No such animal as "idiot PROOF!"
    They just run in a more expert idiot.

    Or we become they.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGaskill View Post
    The wear comes from contact with a very hard bolt.

    I doubt you would want the wear to occur on the bolt, either.
    No, we wouldn't want the bolt to wear either, though it is cheaper to replace... and available.

    But my point was that it is ok to make a repair that is harder than the original.

    pair.jpg

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    Does the piece actually need that hardness?

    If not, or if it needs only the ends/wear points hardened, then I would TIG weld the two pieces together and be done with it.
    By actual test, yes, but I assumed the rod was spring tempered so it can snap over the little hump it goes over and catches.
    Tig welding was the best solution for repair and I'm sure the customer, who is a certified food products machines welder, can figure out how to clamp a heat sink to the replacement part so that the hook surfaces would retain hardness.

    But the best is replacement, thanks to pat_jones post correcting my PN, is this;
    Stevens 520/620 Operating Handle Bar - SARCO, Inc

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    and who is to say that the hardness of the org. is right ? with out having the specs or rockwelling a few other parts to see who knows . but ask yourself this how old is the part how long did it take to brake or ware out it may have been over harden to began with . how much is it going to get used after being repaired or replaced ? more then likely the gun will never even get a case of shells fired though it in the rest of its life . what is your time worth to you ? if you have time and don't want to spend the money then make or repair what you have [i would ]and tig welding is one of the better ways or if you don't mind spending the money then like you were saying jack first , sarco , numnuts [aka gun parts corp.]ebay and the like but there again its more time over money . sounds like you know a good welder so just get on with it and it more then likely don't need to be made out of tool steel that's just ego and ego don't pay the bills

    If the original hardness was adequate, the problem wouldn't be so common.

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    ask yourself this how old is the part how long did it take to brake or ware out it may have been over harden to began with . how much is it going to get used after being repaired or replaced ? more then likely the gun will never even get a case of shells fired though it in the rest of its life .
    There is no way I can answer any of those questions, all I've seen is the original operating rod with it's broken off end.

    . what is your time worth to you ?
    In this case, my customer, who brought it to me, and who will be welding it after I spend ten minutes torch hardening the new end, the value of my time will be in helping him.
    Certain customers are special and this is one, most of the work will be done by him and he's not charging anything either since the family heirloom is owned by a family member.

    He's done little free jobs for me before and it's a pleasure being able to pay him a tiny fraction back.

    Oddly enough two days later another customer who has spent many tens of thousands of dollars here brought two Marlin 1894 lever rifles, one in working condition and one missing a firing pin, I won't be charging him anything either, he just didn't know who to call for replacement part.

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    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    There is no way I can answer any of those questions, all I've seen is the original operating rod with it's broken off end.



    In this case, my customer, who brought it to me, and who will be welding it after I spend ten minutes torch hardening the new end, the value of my time will be in helping him.
    Certain customers are special and this is one, most of the work will be done by him and he's not charging anything either since the family heirloom is owned by a family member.

    He's done little free jobs for me before and it's a pleasure being able to pay him a tiny fraction back.

    Oddly enough two days later another customer who has spent many tens of thousands of dollars here brought two Marlin 1894 lever rifles, one in working condition and one missing a firing pin, I won't be charging him anything either, he just didn't know who to call for replacement part.
    i hear you i do a lot of free work also and we know the ones we want to do it for

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    of courses for $17.25 sarco is out of stock but here is probably the best photo your going to find of the end of that op slid

    Stevens 520/620 Operating Handle Bar - SARCO, Inc


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