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Thread: ETD150 Steel

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    Default ETD150 Steel

    On McMaster Carr its listed as 'high strength 4140' would this steel be a suitable option for a barrel steel? 130k psi yield is a very attractive number, but I am wondering if there is a catch.....anyone have any experience with etd150?

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    never heard of it.....but 4140 is a common barrel steel...anyway,what you quote seems to be 4140HT to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sargentcrunch View Post
    On McMaster Carr its listed as 'high strength 4140' would this steel be a suitable option for a barrel steel? 130k psi yield is a very attractive number, but I am wondering if there is a catch.....anyone have any experience with etd150?
    It is great stuff for studs and shafts and such. The studs that hold the engine on the back of the tub on an Indy Car are made of it. In a huge crash I have seen a 3/8" stud stretch an inch before failure.

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    Elevated Temperature Drawn (ETD) 4150. Stronger version of 4140 or 4150, works about the same.

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    'Elevated temperature drawn' raises a red flag for me. Same process, I believe, used to make 'Stressproof', and it's generally not considered to be suitable for high pressure barrels.

    For a blackpowder barrel you might be fine. Otherwise, I'd be checking with the manufacturer, NOT a supplier, as to its suitability.

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    ETD-150 is resulfurized to improve machinability. This may reduce fracture toughness and impact toughness in particular. Check with the LaSalle, the manufacturer. ETD-150 is lovely stuff for things like tailstock quills, but I am not so sure about gun barrels.

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    This would be for a .44 magnum single shot, I sent an email to LaSalle to see what they say. Though I imagine as soon as they hear 'gun barrel' they will refuse to comment haha

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    416 stainless is commonly used for barrels. Also a resulphurized material.

    However, barrels are made from 416R, designating rifle barrel quality. Not necessarily the same as generic material you'd get from industrial suppliers.

    Levels of sulphur, and sulphide stringers are controlled.

    'Transverse Rupture Strength' is a property that comes to mind. And I think stringers are a bad thing in that regard.

    I've seen no suppliers of it available from stock. Appears to be available only from the mill in larger than hobbiest qty requirements.

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    Stop........................Why use a material that NO ONE else uses for barrels?

    Not suitable for high pressure spikes. Likes to crack.

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    The other major barrel steel is 4140. Just use one of the two materials that every barrel manufactures use.

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    I like etd 150 it machines nice but it WILL move as you work it
    I recently made a new cross slide lead screw out of it and it moved about .030 after threading 20190913_064801.jpg
    I would not use it for anything that you want to be straight after machining

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    Hi:
    It is my humble understanding 4140 and 4140 firearm steel are not the same (ditto 416 and 416R). There is a lot higher quality control and testing for any steel used in firearms to assure consistent structure throughout the steel bar. A flaw in a rifle action or barrel can and has killed people. You can get buy with different steels a lot of times but it only takes blowing up a rifle once to make a big impression (I have gotten by twice with only minor inquiry). I will also add that a lot of firearms have been made from other steels and aluminum but usually they are heat treated and tested to high standards (not including war production by countries who placed a low value on soldiers. Cast iron and bronze/brass has also been used in many low pressure firearms but it would not be my first choice. Just food for thought. GeorgeM

    PS: It is a lot easier to re-drill and rifle an old rifle barrel. There are lots of old barrels floating around. Just find a high power shooter he should have several.


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