Has anyone sleeved the chambers of a 1889 six shooter
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Kamloops, B.C.
    Posts
    78
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default Has anyone sleeved the chambers of a 1889 six shooter

    Hi , trying to find a way to repair a six shooters cylinder of a 120 year old 44 Cal German made six shooter?
    The bullets are very loose in the chambers, it appears that someone center punched the cylinder on the outer diameter
    so it would tighten up the bullet in the chamber.
    Toying with sleeving each chamber, or ?
    Anyone done a repair like that?
    Tks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    633
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    33
    Likes (Received)
    147

    Default

    Being that old i bet i would have been maybe compressed blackpowder charge not a modern powder i wonder if the thing was overloaded with modern powder and the oversize is the result of stretching or yielding of the material that makes up the cylinder.
    If so without sticking my neck out, maybe its just a wall hanger and safer being one. Tag it so.

    Any other people have thoughts on why it would be oversize? wrong ammo dimensions?

    As for a repair take it to a gunsmith to see what his thoughts are.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,104
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13
    Likes (Received)
    318

    Default

    Slug the barrel to check the bore dimension, it might be an odd size. Previous owner might have been trying to use the wrong ammo.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    211
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    68
    Likes (Received)
    170

    Default

    Pictures always help.
    Not all .44s are the same caliber.
    If someone has center punched the cylinders, you may have additional issues.
    Proceed with caution.
    Take lots of measurements.
    And consider just machining a new cylinder.
    And heat treating it.

  5. Likes Dualkit liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,116
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8709

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EJHanson View Post
    Hi , trying to find a way to repair a six shooters cylinder of a 120 year old 44 Cal German made six shooter?
    The bullets are very loose in the chambers, it appears that someone center punched the cylinder on the outer diameter
    so it would tighten up the bullet in the chamber.
    Toying with sleeving each chamber, or ?
    Anyone done a repair like that?
    Tks
    Wall-hanger.

    If you want a "shooter"?

    Duplicate it. 100% In modern steels.

    Then use underpowered hand loads. Only. The design is suspect as well as the condition.

    Show it off next to the NOT to be fired original as a mark of your skill.

    No interest in that? Wall hanger.

    Plenty of safer modern firearms as will cost less than duplicating it.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Kamloops, B.C.
    Posts
    78
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Thanks for all your thoughts, will let you know what the outcome will be.
    Cheers!

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    326
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    64
    Likes (Received)
    126

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EJHanson View Post
    Hi , trying to find a way to repair a six shooters cylinder of a 120 year old 44 Cal German made six shooter?
    The bullets are very loose in the chambers, it appears that someone center punched the cylinder on the outer diameter
    so it would tighten up the bullet in the chamber.
    Toying with sleeving each chamber, or ?
    Anyone done a repair like that?
    Tks
    OK, first, the Germans had a service revolver that was "about" a .44 Caliber at that time, but please take careful note - the Germans did NOT use the American/English cartridge specification nomenclature, which results in our ".44 Caliber" using a bullet of 0.429" diameter.

    The Germans had a round used in their "Reichsrevolver" service revolvers, the "10.6x25R" cartridge, sometimes called the 10.55mm German. These come out to be about 0.417. The chambers of various Reichsrevolvers could be straight or slightly tapered, and the bore can tend to have deep grooves.

    A picture would really help, as would some chamber & barrel measurements. If you have any documentation, I might be able to lend assistance in translating from German, as I can read/write German fairly well and have done a bit of work in translating German gun docs.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    2,409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10
    Likes (Received)
    755

    Default

    It may also be a common US caliber of the 1880s,44 Bulldog,also known as 44 Webley,these guns took a very short shell ,about 2/3in long ,case dia 470,bullet dia 440/442......The guns generally stamped "British Bulldog" were continental in origin,and popular in the west due to cheap prices .....half what a Colt cost.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •