Help me spec/build my Haas TL1/2 - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Here's my two cents worth.

    If you can afford the bigger lathe, and you might actually use the capacity, then sure, get that.

    Are you honestly going to be able to get far away from the lathe, while it's working, that the turret is going to make any difference to you for the added expense?
    The way I see almost all the jobs on a barrel, you are either dealing with a long slow cut on the taper, which really does not use the tooling change capability, or you are turning to size and threading the end, which is done in little enough time that you are not going to go scratch your nuts between barrels. In either case, I would be looking at a decent quality Quick Change Tool Post like a Multifix, that has the high repeatability that allows you to have your tooling pre-set in the control, just as it would be in a turret, and ready to drop in place. Except you can have dozens of loaded up holders, and only four on the turret at a time.
    It just does not seem to be the kind of work that justifies spending the money on, as you are not going to very often be able to walk away from the machine anyways.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    Here's my two cents worth.

    If you can afford the bigger lathe, and you might actually use the capacity, then sure, get that.

    Are you honestly going to be able to get far away from the lathe, while it's working, that the turret is going to make any difference to you for the added expense?
    The way I see almost all the jobs on a barrel, you are either dealing with a long slow cut on the taper, which really does not use the tooling change capability, or you are turning to size and threading the end, which is done in little enough time that you are not going to go scratch your nuts between barrels. In either case, I would be looking at a decent quality Quick Change Tool Post like a Multifix, that has the high repeatability that allows you to have your tooling pre-set in the control, just as it would be in a turret, and ready to drop in place. Except you can have dozens of loaded up holders, and only four on the turret at a time.
    It just does not seem to be the kind of work that justifies spending the money on, as you are not going to very often be able to walk away from the machine anyways.
    Actually, you can have up to 8 turning tools. The turret is large enough to stick a tool out each end of the 4 sides. Of course you need to plan around that as one way will have the bulk of the turret towards the spindle. And boring bars don't work great like that unless they are all short stubby guys.

    capture.jpg

    Don't know if it would help or hurt as I don't know anything about gunsmithing...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails turret.jpg  

  3. #23
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    If you are creative, and using the lathe as a chucker, you can gang up stations on the turret to get 8, or even 16+ tools. I saw one shop that had 3 tools hanging off one station, although, it looked like it had some sag just looking at it with the naked eye.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Actually, you can have up to 8 turning tools. The turret is large enough to stick a tool out each end of the 4 sides. Of course you need to plan around that as one way will have the bulk of the turret towards the spindle. And boring bars don't work great like that unless they are all short stubby guys.

    capture.jpg

    Don't know if it would help or hurt as I don't know anything about gunsmithing...
    Having to juggle your programming around trying to dodge the 'other' tool in that position, it a bunch of opportunities to screw up your work.
    For all intents and purposes, it amounts to a four position, four tool, turret.

    I think a turret would be the balls for any kind of short run production with a bar feeder or puller and a power collet or chuck, but it seems that the convenience of having four or even more tools on deck that you have to work around, sorta kills the utility of the feature.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 300sniper View Post
    If you are creative, and using the lathe as a chucker, you can gang up stations on the turret to get 8, or even 16+ tools. I saw one shop that had 3 tools hanging off one station, although, it looked like it had some sag just looking at it with the naked eye.
    With the right parts in process, you could do a lot of things, but they sure won't help out the fella trying to turn a profile on a barrel all that much.

    I mean, if you were going to do chucker style work, a turret is even less useful than a single station QCTP, compared to a solid mount loaded up with a row of minimum extension tooling right across the travel of the cross slide.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    With the right parts in process, you could do a lot of things, but they sure won't help out the fella trying to turn a profile on a barrel all that much.

    I mean, if you were going to do chucker style work, a turret is even less useful than a single station QCTP, compared to a solid mount loaded up with a row of minimum extension tooling right across the travel of the cross slide.
    This is all true. Maybe the turret gives a bit more flexibility if you wanted to use it ganged up, or with a tailstock.

    Either way, my opinion is a TL- isn’t the best machine for tapering barrels. Personally, I’d get a real turning center for fitting and chambering barrels, and farm our the rare taper job. But everyone’s workload is different. The OP needs to be realistic about his needs.

  7. #27
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    Been down this exact path. Considered Haas, Harrison Alpha and ROMI. If you want to contour you will battle without a follow rest. I went with the Romi but wish I went with the Harrison. The Harrison has an option of the follow rest, at the time Haas had a design for a follow rest too. The Romi was the far better lathe than the Haas on paper plus it was cheaper - the problem came in putting the follow rest on - This was a learning point for me, always ask the salesman if he's spent any time on the handles, don't take their word that fitting anything "custom" is easy. Took forever (I mean years) to get it sorted properly and even then the clearance between the turret and the follow rest is very tight. The Harrison had everything including iirc the ability to swing the follow rest out of the way plus optional C-Axis which would allow fluting too, but, it was twice the price. In the end I'm happy with the Romi, the Siemens control is easy and I managed to integrate the follow rest operation into the conversational control - which Romi told me could not be done. TL;DR If I did it again, I would get the Harrison and pay the money, get the longest with the biggest spindle and the turret. If you will be running it all day knocking out barrels I would get the chip conveyor too. If you consider the Romi and end up with one, drop me a line and I will give you the code to integrate the steady into the conversational. The other thing you will need to consider is the length through the headstock - The Romi is very long so I use a True-bore-alignment chuck, but otherwise check for clearance for fitting a spider.


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