Machining Galil Receiver
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  1. #1
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    Default Machining Galil Receiver

    Hello everyone! I've asked around on a few different forums for some advice about this but didn't get anything satisfactory. Since what I'm asking about is pretty much all machining, I figured this was the place to come!

    I am going to build a Galil ARM. The Galil's receiver is based off of a Valmet Rk 62 Receiver, which is based off of an milled AK47 receiver. I was considering buying a Galil receiver, but they're grossly expensive, costing $400 - $600. Even 80%s are quite pricey. However, the proper sized chunk of 4140 can be bought off of SpeedyMetals for $150.

    I've been looking over some CAD files for an AK47 receiver, as well as the original blueprints for the AK47 and the Galil which I managed to find online. The only available model for the Galil receiver was hosted on GrabCAD, and got taken down a long time ago. I've started on reconstructing it. I have basically all of the information necessary to make the receiver, besides spending several hours modeling it. But I'm not sure I have the skill necessary to manufacture it.

    At my university, I have free access to a state of the art machine shop. I am familiar with using a lathe, and know the basics of using a mill. However, the AK receiver is quite complicated. It involves lots of intricate cuts, including very precise keyset cuts for the ejector/rail area and floor of the receiver, and other things that I'm not even sure how to do, like the circular cuts for the locking lugs.

    Anyways, I guess my question boils down to this:
    Should I even bother with attempting this? I figured that since the AK47 is such an old design, and was produced on 50s era hardware, it couldn't be extremely difficult. However I'm not so sure about that anymore. Can anyone give me some information on what it takes to mill one of these receivers?

    Here are some screenshots
    pls-help.jpg
    ak-milled-receiver-rail-ejector.jpg

  2. #2
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    I always think it is a great idea to take on this kind of project. Success or failure, you still learn a lot.

    That being said, given the parameters you've set, I'd say "No!". Unless you get it in writing from the department/college head using the universities equipment to make a gun receiver sends up all kinds of red flags and blaring sirens.

    JMHO

    -Ron

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  4. #3
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    I bet by the time you buy your needed tooling, buy a few chunks, and spend the hrs doing the work $400-$600 will look pretty cheap. Better off spending a few more hrs in the mine and buying what you want. Learn on easy stuff.

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    Ignoring for now the University PC BS, start your model with a rectangular block of steel. Remove volume from your block in the order you would machine it. Make a spreadsheet listing every cut, the tool required, the cut dimensions, and may as well add feeds and speeds while you're at it. Work towards completion one cut at a time. Virtual machining. If you get stuck, come back with pics and specific questions. When the model is done, the rest is just making chips.

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    $400-$600 will seem dirt cheap compared to the money and hours you will put into it, all to end up with a uncompleted project or an inferior receiver.

    You will probably have to make special jigs and fixtures and maybe even grind special cutters.

    It is very difficult to make a difficult project in a public shop, unless you can spend 8hrs a day hogging a machine. Coming in a hour here, hour there you won't even get the receiver and machine set up before it is time to clean up.

    Get a few successes on less complicated projects before taking something like this on.

  8. #6
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    Galil receivers are expensive for a reason. Micro Galil receivers are $1,000+ for example. It can get a lot more expensive. I don't think it's worth it in my opinion.


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