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  1. #21
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    Why not just get a semi-auto or a revolver? What problem are you trying to solve? There are plenty of black powder revolvers on the market that you can mail order.

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    Some of the early repeaters/MGs had preloaded percussion cap "cartridges" that dropped in behind the barrel, fired and ejected before the next "cartridge" fed in. I believe Hatcher's Notebook has some descriptions of these.

    Try shooting your pistol and then wrapping your fingers around the barrel immediately after. Depending on the mass of the barrel it might be hotter than you want to handle with bare hands.

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    I own both revolvers and semi-autos, but I want to create something by myself and I want to keep it simple.

    I have two competitors, Mechanical pin Imgur: The magic of the Internet vs
    Magnet inside socket: Imgur: The magic of the Internet

    What concerns me with the mechanical attachment is that if there is just a slight gap/play between the barrel and the frame, then the barrel upon firing will slam into the frame. With the magnet solution that’s not the issue, but play inside of the socket can maybe create a somewhat similar problem, depending on how the frame is designed (watch the recoil of the rhino revolver). Another con with the mechanical pin is that the insertion of the barrels is harder.

    Regarding the magnet version, if the socket is made strong, what could possibly be the issues with that design? The socket will prevent the barrels from moving anywhere except for forward, and the recoil won’t push the barrels forward. When you insert new barrels inside the socket, they will line up just like the previous did (if there isn’t any play to consider).

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    That you are 100% wrong!

    As an experienced black powder shooter I can guarantee that the breech pressure would launch the barrel and spew hot gases back in your face. Over the years I've seen poorly maintained arms (worn threads) launch nipples and touch hole liners upon firing.

    If you want a removable barrel the screw-barrel design has been around for centuries and gives a high velocity shot with rather small charges of powder.

    UPDATE: Here's a video of a modern replica showing loading and other details.

    YouTube

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Model62 View Post
    The barrel is a smoothbore loaded with a patched roundball.

    Maybe a mechanical solution is a better approach? Something like this: Imgur: The magic of the Internet The ”pin” at the receiver is inserted into the hole at the rear of the barrel.

    Here’s another design, mechanical and magnetic combined: Imgur: The magic of the Internet

    What I’m really trying to achieve here is a very simple single shot muzzleloaded pistol that easily can be reloaded by switching to a preloaded barrel after firing.
    I hadn't read through the whole thread before replying. If what you are trying to achieve is a replaceable barrel/breech unit the solution already exists. It's called the Patent or hooked breech. The barrel, breech and nipple are removable as one piece and is mounted into the stock by engaging a hook on the breech plug with a recess on the steel tang mounted to the stock. Normally the barrel is retained by a wedge that slides through a slotted tenon under the barrel. The only issue with interchangeable barrel units would be to make sure all of them were properly fitted to the tang, stock, and barrel retainer (wedge or catch).

    Plan drawing,
    full exact size,
    Nock's patent breech - Track of the Wolf


    PS: That Imgur site is loaded with hare-brained schemes cooked up by people with no practical knowledge. Just because they can draw it doesn't mean you can build it or that it's practical.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    I hadn't read through the whole thread before replying. If what you are trying to achieve is a replaceable barrel/breech unit the solution already exists. It's called the Patent or hooked breech. The barrel, breech and nipple are removable as one piece and is mounted into the stock by engaging a hook on the breech plug with a recess on the steel tang mounted to the stock. Normally the barrel is retained by a wedge that slides through a slotted tenon under the barrel. The only issue with interchangeable barrel units would be to make sure all of them were properly fitted to the tang, stock, and barrel retainer (wedge or catch).

    Plan drawing,
    full exact size,
    Nock's patent breech - Track of the Wolf


    PS: That Imgur site is loaded with hare-brained schemes cooked up by people with no practical knowledge. Just because they can draw it doesn't mean you can build it or that it's practical.
    The barrel and breech is one solid unit. The patent/hooked breech is another mechanical approach of attachment, but is it the best solution? The obvious con would be the hook that need to be made with precision at the rear of each barrel.

    If you take a look at this picture Imgur: The magic of the Internet If the socket is permanently attached to the frame and is made out of a strong material it will prevent the barrels from moving anywhere but forward. What’s the cons of that design compared to a hooked breech?

  9. #27
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    Some of the early repeaters/MGs had preloaded percussion cap "cartridges" that dropped in behind the barrel, fired and ejected before the next "cartridge" fed in.
    The first Gatling guns used capped steel chambers, essentially cartridges, that dropped out the bottom.
    My first thought was of the Blowfarward actions that all faded into obscurity soon after the turn of the 19th century into the twentieth (The 1909 Schwarzlose Pistol), but then realized the OP was talking about a barrel that included it's own breech plug.
    I like the slide shotgun, the barrel slides inside a pipe with a firing pin fixed at it's breech, you just slide the barrel bak and slam fire it. Then have a "Quiver" with ten or fifteen loaded barrels in it.
    Walk into the valley of death leaving a trail of empty barrels behind.
    I'll watch from a distance.


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