making a bullet trap
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Brunswick Oh USA
    Posts
    4,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5696
    Likes (Received)
    2919

    Default making a bullet trap

    I want to make one that will accept up to a 40 cal. This will be pistols only. .375 AR500 will be used for the wings and 4" ID 3/8 wall tube for the catch.
    Here's the type I'd like to build. The wings will have a 25º included angle. Is this the safest build?


    Just finished/tested my prototype indoor bullet trap - Pelican Parts Forums

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4855
    Likes (Received)
    5137

    Default

    I think an over-lap of the angles is good rather than having a/any flat at the center.

    I shot a hole through one of the best traps after its owner nagged and bet me that his trap was made for any bullet.
    Yes, I was shooting 8mm military armor-piercing ..and I told him that upfront..These bullets are made to shoot through steel.

    Sparks did fly...

    And we were upstairs in his dad's roller rink where there was one of that priceless mirror balls. we/he would have in big trouble with knocking/shooting out mirrors.

    Yes, it looks like that trap has an overlap of angles.
    Last edited by michiganbuck; 06-25-2021 at 07:26 AM.

  3. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brusly, LA
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    371

    Default

    thats pretty much the design of the professional bullet trap we have at work. The striking plates are not that thick though Id say 1/4" at most, they bounce the bullets at an angle into a round drum area like you have designed but its octagonal in shape as Im sure its made of ar500 plate, its just a lot bigger in diameter. FYI ours will stop green tip 556 and 762x39
    if all your ever gonna do is pistol rounds it should be fine.

  5. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Brunswick Oh USA
    Posts
    4,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5696
    Likes (Received)
    2919

    Default

    I don't think it was mentioned in the link, but I read somewhere that 25º was optimal for deflection. On the other hand, I've seen 45º and bigger. What's your opinion?

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    292
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    146
    Likes (Received)
    80

    Default

    I believe that the lower the angle, the safer it is.

    Of course, it has to be wide and tall enough to catch every possible errand bullet. So for a given width, the lower the angle, the deeper the whole contraption will have to be.

    Jacques

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    833
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    458
    Likes (Received)
    569

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Behner View Post
    I don't think it was mentioned in the link, but I read somewhere that 25º was optimal for deflection. On the other hand, I've seen 45º and bigger. What's your opinion?
    sin(25°)=0.422
    sin(45°)=0.707

    It's directly relevant to the amount of forward momentum that gets transferred into normal force. My brothers and I regularly shoot a hanging AR500 (I think it's 3/8" but it might be 1/2") plate with rifles (5.56, .308, 30-06, etc.) outdoors and it's barely pocked after months of service. With even 70% of a pistol strike, 3/8" will be just fine for quite a while, and you get a bigger catcher with less steel.

    Edit: you said included angle. The numbers will be more like:

    sin(12.5°)=0.216
    sin(22.5°)=0.382

    So use whatever angle will give you enough coverage to catch 'em all.

  9. Likes BT Fabrication, Ray Behner liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    IL/WI border
    Posts
    3,545
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1285
    Likes (Received)
    1109

    Default

    There are no bullets to trap nowadays...

  11. Likes Yan Wo, 1yesca liked this post
  12. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4855
    Likes (Received)
    5137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelP View Post
    There are no bullets to trap nowadays...
    And if you buy bullets your name might go on the watch/remember list.

    I saw a youtube that had 1/4" steel as the backstop and it was dimpling out with 9mm and 38sp , so likely I would go 3/8 or 1/2"

    I think 45* or less, likely I would go 30* / 30*

    Of 1/2" (perhaps 3/8) one sheet at 45* backstop would be Ok...with 1/4" sides and floor. yes, bullets just go to the floor.

    Many bullets missing the trap go right through the wall so that needs to be considered.

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    116
    Likes (Received)
    680

    Default

    Straying from design and material.....If shop located on slab, and taking what's under the slab into account have known a shop or two to core drill the slab, insert some thickwall pipe and let mother nature be the bullet trap. Some place a thick rubber baffle to insert barrel.

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,458
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    918
    Likes (Received)
    655

    Default

    It's pretty but they are super messy. Every bullet that hits it splatters a cloud. My preference is a box full of crumb rubber with rubber belting on the front. You can screw new rubber patches over the front as it gets too shot up but that takes a lot of shooting. About 16-24" deep would probably be fine. The nice thing about this type trap is that whole bullets come out. I have one in my shop for 22lr. Very clean. The 22lr only goes about 5" in so mine is only 12" deep.

  15. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  16. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Brunswick Oh USA
    Posts
    4,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5696
    Likes (Received)
    2919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Deal View Post
    It's pretty but they are super messy. Every bullet that hits it splatters a cloud. My preference is a box full of crumb rubber with rubber belting on the front. You can screw new rubber patches over the front as it gets too shot up but that takes a lot of shooting. About 16-24" deep would probably be fine. The nice thing about this type trap is that whole bullets come out. I have one in my shop for 22lr. Very clean. The 22lr only goes about 5" in so mine is only 12" deep.
    That's interesting, but how do you glean the lead? What is the box made of?

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Centerville,OH
    Posts
    2,186
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    101

    Default

    I use rubber mulch in my trap too. Nothing I've shot (.308 and below) has ever gone more than 28" deep into the mulch.

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,458
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    918
    Likes (Received)
    655

    Default

    Mine is just pressure treated 2x12’s for deeper could use plywood. If outdoor put a little metal roof over it. Mine is small so I can just dump it. The rifle team here had one. Theirs got much more use than mine ever will. I’ll try to find out how they emptied it. Mine uses mulch too. WVU’s was more like rubber pea gravel or just a tad larger.

    If I remember correctly they vacuumed out the rubber and the lead was left behind. I find out for sure.

  19. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  20. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    5,033
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2448
    Likes (Received)
    3130

    Default

    When I was a kid we used to shoot small bore matches at the local armory range which was just a couple of blocks away.
    That range would toss lead back at you and I remember during one match getting a flake of hot lead settle on my cheek as I was on the firing line.
    I never got how that happened till I asked a guy with lots of experience at the range where I shoot now.
    Apparently someone had shot rifle into the backer which exceeded its limits and dimpled the plate so a shot hitting it just right would sling lead out of the dimple back at the firing positions.

    Still seems improbable with a down angle plate and sand trap but..


    Edit-
    I am not suggesting anything like that is possible with this trap design.
    Just a story...

  21. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  22. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    4,842
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3544
    Likes (Received)
    2499

    Default

    Sorry, I misread a post.

  23. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brusly, LA
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    371

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    When I was a kid we used to shoot small bore matches at the local armory range which was just a couple of blocks away.
    That range would toss lead back at you and I remember during one match getting a flake of hot lead settle on my cheek as I was on the firing line.
    I never got how that happened till I asked a guy with lots of experience at the range where I shoot now.
    Apparently someone had shot rifle into the backer which exceeded its limits and dimpled the plate so a shot hitting it just right would sling lead out of the dimple back at the firing positions.

    Still seems improbable with a down angle plate and sand trap but..


    Edit-
    I am not suggesting anything like that is possible with this trap design.
    Just a story...
    hahaha I used to shoot those matches too at the NG armories in New Orleans and Baker and a few others. Funny you should say that the ranges were the same design of flat angled plate and a back wall and they threw lead at us too.
    the new design traps with plates angled top and bottom. ive never had one throw back at me even at short range but I still wear eye pro.

  24. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,275
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    28
    Likes (Received)
    483

    Default

    Those ranges were all angled 45*. My maintenance unit used to go in and weld up and grind the divots when they were shot with anything besides .22 or pistol rounds. If there was more of an angle towards the shooters, there would be less chance for back splatter.

  25. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  26. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,458
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    918
    Likes (Received)
    655

    Default

    I talked to a buddy who is the former rifle coach’s husband. This backstop is about 40’ wide and 8’ high. It had some sort of vacuum system built into it. Sounds almost like a wood working dust collector fan. There was a place they could open on the bottom of the trap and the rubber and bullets would go on the floor. He’d just vacuum the rubber up and the vacuum hose would just dump the rubber back into the trap and leave the bullets on the floor. They would then shovel them into buckets.

    I’ve been in a lot of indoor ranges this was the cleanest I’ve ever seen.

  27. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  28. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,731
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    659
    Likes (Received)
    838

    Default

    Mine has a 20" X 20" opening and both sides and top/bottom plates are "Seen" by bullets at a 20 degree angle. The plates were all burned out of AR500 3/16" thick, but the trap was designed only for pistol (And I mean pistol cartridges).
    It looks similar to what your showing, but I used a 6" schd 40 pipe for the snail, because the bullets only hit it on a bounce.
    I may try to insert photos tomorrow, we've used it for many years now.

  29. Likes Ray Behner liked this post
  30. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,731
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    659
    Likes (Received)
    838

    Default

    A few days late. Crude in appearance it's none the less effective, though the bullet holes in the steel door may suggest otherwise, hey, everyone has to learn to acquire the sight picture. (I was teaching a lady using a Ruger target pistol with fast fire red dot, she found "Ghost" dots at angles off target somehow)
    The first photo is looking at the front with a target hanging on the spring spikes.
    20210706_170646-1-.jpg
    The second is the same view without a target.
    20210706_170711.jpg
    Looks like somehow they got turned left 90 degrees!

  31. Likes Ray Behner liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •