Making a Snider action
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Redlands, Ca
    Posts
    277
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    .....As the happy new owner of an 11" logan, one of the first projects I'd like to tackle is to make a Snider action for the .577 Snider cartridge. This may not be THE first, but will surely be close to the first project. In fact I've already aquired a 1-1/8" straight octagon 3 groove 58 cal, 27" long bbl.

    My main question is material. As these were originally built in the late 1860's, early 1870's their steel had nowhere near the pedigree's available to us now. I'm sure they used the best they had for the purpose.

    Since this isn't a production deal the quantities will be small. I plan on using it only with the original propellant and have no plans on turning it into a 577 Nitro Express (short). Online Metals has 4140 alloy in suitable bars.

    I will hazard that 4140 would be suitable for the action and breechblock, but does this then have to be heat treated beyond it's "as recieved" state?

    Would another alloy be as suitable? Comments, suggestions?

    Thanks,
    Rick

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Montrose Iowa
    Posts
    1,180
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Why not try preharden 4140/4150 I think its around 40C. This should be hard enough, and you shure don't want it too hard to the point of being brittle. If you heat treat it after maching it will warp some anyway.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    United States of America
    Posts
    271
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    4140 is what most gun actions are made of.

    All of the commercial actions are heat treated. I treated my .50 BMG action to 45 Rc. I did not have any warpage.

    Some people choose to heat treat and then true up the actions in case there is any warpage.


    I think it would be easier to do the machining first and then heat treat. The snider action only has a few moving parts and they arent that intricate. Warpage shouldnt be a major concern on that kind of action.

    Are you doing this from a blueprint ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Redlands, Ca
    Posts
    277
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    "Are you doing this from a blueprint ?"

    Nope. I have an original MkII** to use as a pattern. I'm not planning on having it 'parts exchangeable' with an original to any great extent. All dimensions will be close but not an exact duplicate. I do plan on using an original hammer and lockplate so some duplication will take place.

    It will be a visualy identifiable Snider in all respects, but will be patterned more after a civilian short rifle (the 27" bbl) etc. If it turns out as I plan and I have the funds at the time, I may have the action colorcased. THAT will remain to be seen

    Thank you all for your replies, BTW.

    Rick

    Rick

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Russellville, AR 72802
    Posts
    474
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Take Kurt's advice, use prehardened 4140. It machines well, costs less than having hardening done as a separate operation, eliminates the possibility of warping or scale formation, is not subject to errors in heat treatment since it is checked before shipping to suppliers, and is much stronger than the original materials.

    If you were making an action that required great strength, a better choice would be S7 properly heat treated.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •